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PCD News Summary for December 1, 2016

Logo: Preventing Chronic Disease Weekly Press Summary

About the Journal

Published every Thursday, Preventing Chronic Disease (PCD) is a peer-reviewed online journal established by CDC’s National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. The News Media Branch prepares press summary packets each week. To receive these press summaries on an embargoed basis, send an e-mail to media@cdc.gov. Please note that this e-mail list is for credentialed journalists only. All others, please visit Hookup to Health to sign up for e-mail updates


Notice to News Media – PCD Release Time and Embargo Policy:
CDC’s News Media Branch releases to reporters the PCD media packet every Tuesday afternoon between 12 and 2 pm.

County-Level Variation in Per Capita Spending for Multiple Chronic Conditions among Fee-For-Service Medicare Beneficiaries, 2014

Melissa Newton
mnewton@cdc.gov
404-718-6281

A Physical Activity Intervention and Changes in Body Mass Index at a Middle School With a Large American Indian Population, Oklahoma, 2004–2009

Melissa Newton
mnewton@cdc.gov
404-718-6281

County-Level Variation in Per Capita Spending for Multiple Chronic Conditions among Fee-For-Service Medicare Beneficiaries, 2014

In 2014, 4.3 million Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries ages 65 years or older had six or more chronic conditions. When analyzed by county, there were geographic clusters of high Medicare per capita spending in northern Louisiana, western Alabama, northern Texas, central Wyoming, western Pennsylvania, the Chicago metropolitan area, and Los Angeles County. Clusters of low per capita spending were found in northeast Wisconsin, northwest Michigan, western Oregon and upstate New York. Understanding how Medicare spending is distributed across the United States among older adults with the highest burden of multiple chronic conditions can assist with targeting prevention and disease management efforts.

A Physical Activity Intervention and Changes in Body Mass Index at a Middle School With a Large American Indian Population, Oklahoma, 2004–2009

Overall, middle school students participating in a physical activity class for one year had better body mass index (BMI) scores than nonparticipating students. A physical education class that engaged middle school students in a daily one-mile walk or run and other team sports was developed in a rural school in southwestern Oklahoma with a large American Indian population. BMI scores decreased among boys and were stable among girls who participated in the program.

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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

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