MMWR News Synopsis for February 8, 2019

Awareness of Heart Attack Symptoms and Response Among Adults — United States, 2008, 2014, and 2017

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Improving public awareness of all five signs and symptoms of a heart attack and knowledge of calling 911 if someone has a heart attack is important and may lead to improved survival and better outcomes. A multi-faceted approach across clinical and community settings is needed to increase awareness. Each year there are an estimated 750,000 heart attacks in the US. When heart attack signs and symptoms appear, early intervention is critical. Improving public knowledge of the signs and symptoms of a heart attack is important and may lead to improved survival and better outcomes. In 2017,many people still are not aware of all signs and symptoms of a heart attack and know to call 911. Disparities in awareness among demographic groups also continue to exist.

Actions in Support of Newborn Screening for Critical Congenital Heart Disease — United States, 2011–2018

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All U.S. newborns, regardless of the state they are born in, now can be screened for critical congenital heart defects. Critical congenital heart defects occur in almost 1 in 500 births. Newborn screening for critical congenital heart defects can help identify some babies with heart defects before they go home from the birth hospital. This allows affected babies to be treated early and may prevent death early in life. Between 2011 and 2018, all states and Washington, D.C., created policies for screening for critical congenital heart defects. Many state screening programs get screening information from hospitals or birthing centers. However, not all states have systems in place for tracking screening results or sharing information with birth defects tracking programs. It is important that screening programs and birth defects tracking programs share information to allow for evaluation of screening. Despite some limitations in data collection and sharing, all U.S. newborns, regardless of the state they are born in, now have the opportunity to be screened for critical congenital heart defects.

Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices Recommended Immunization Schedule for Children and Adolescents Aged 18 Years or Younger — United States, 2019

CDC Media Relations
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The child/adolescent and adult immunization schedules help health care professionals identify which vaccines their patients need, when they need them, and how many doses of each vaccine they need based on age, health conditions, and other factors. The design of the 2019 Child and Adolescent Immunization Schedule has been updated. Content updates include new or revised ACIP recommendations for hepatitis A vaccine (HepA); hepatitis B vaccine (Hep B); influenza vaccine; tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid and acellular pertussis vaccine (Tdap); and clarification of recommendations for inactivated poliovirus vaccines (IPV).

Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices Recommended Immunization Schedule for Adults Aged 19 Years or Older — United States, 2019

CDC Media Relations
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The child and adolescent and adult immunization schedules help health care professionals identify which vaccines their patients need; when they need them; and how many doses of each vaccine they need based on age, health conditions, and other factors. Each year, CDC and partner organizations publish an updated schedule of immunizations recommended for every child, adolescent, and adult in the U.S. The design of the 2019 schedule has been updated. Updates to the 2019 Adult Immunization Schedule include new or revised Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommendations for influenza, hepatitis B, and hepatitis A vaccinations.

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Page last reviewed: February 7, 2019