MMWR News Synopsis for July 19, 2108

Access to Treatment for Hepatitis B Virus Infection — Worldwide, 2016

CDC Media Relations
404-639-3286

The median price of generic tenofovir – a drug that is highly effective against hepatitis B virus (HBV) – fell by >85% between 2004 and 2016. However, global treatment coverage of HBV remains low. Increased awareness, improved access and availability to affordable diagnostics, and training of health care providers might increase access to treatment. An estimated 257 million people were living with chronic HBV infection in 2015. HBV infection can be fatal, but effective treatment is available. In 2017, most countries could legally procure affordable, generic antivirals against HBV infection. However, global treatment coverage of HBV is low. Access to treatment could be increased by taking advantage of reductions in price of antivirals active against HBV infection.

HIV Testing, Linkage to HIV Medical Care, and Interviews for Partner Services Among Black Men Who Have Sex with Men — Non–Health Care Facilities, 20 Southern U.S. Jurisdictions, 2016

CDC Media Relations
404-639-3286

A new CDC analysis suggests that efforts are needed to increase HIV testing of African American gay and bisexual men in non-healthcare facilities in the South. An analysis of CDC-funded HIV testing from 20 health departments in the South found that 6 percent of HIV tests were provided to African American gay and bisexual men in 2016 and accounted for 36 percent of the new diagnoses in non-healthcare facilities. Among black gay and bisexual men in the South, the highest percentages of tests were provided to men ages 25–34 (43 percent), living in metropolitan areas (75 percent), and who had tested previously (81 percent). The analysis also found that 67 percent of those who received new diagnoses were linked to HIV medical care within 90 days. HIV testing programs in the South can be designed to reach more black gay and bisexual men who are unaware of their HIV status either by conducting targeted, risk-based testing in non-healthcare settings and/or by routine screening in agencies that also provide health care services to black gay and bisexual men.

Identification of Primary Congenital Hypothyroidism Based on Two Newborn Screens — Utah, 2010–2016

CDC Media Relations
404-639-3286

Untreated congenital hypothyroidism can result in cognitive impairment and growth complications. Considering that 20 percent of all cases in Utah were identified only through a second newborn screen, this study highlights the utility of a second screen. While most states perform only one newborn screen, 14 states, including Utah, perform a routine second newborn screen at about two weeks of age. In Utah, screening for congenital hypothyroidism, a disorder that affects normal thyroid function, is part of the first and second screen. If left untreated the disease results in severe cognitive impairment and growth complications. This comprehensive seven-year review showed that 20 percent of all patients with the disorder were identified only through the second screen. The study also showed that simply lowering the cut-off values for the first screen would not have allowed the identification of all cases. The authors emphasize the utility of a routine second screen.

Notes from the Field:

Quick Stats:

###

U.S. Department of Health and Human ServicesExternal

CDC works 24/7 protecting America’s health, safety, and security. Whether diseases start at home or abroad, are curable or preventable, chronic or acute, or from human activity or deliberate attack, CDC responds to America’s most pressing health threats. CDC is headquartered in Atlanta and has experts located throughout the United States and the world.

Page last reviewed: July 19, 2018