MMWR News Synopsis for July 5, 2018

Evaluation of Occupational Exposure Limits for Heat Stress in Outdoor Workers — United States, 2011–2016

CDC Media Relations
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Workers can suffer from heat stroke when temperatures are only in the 80s. This means that in the summer, outdoor workers in almost any U.S. state could succumb to a heat stroke on an average afternoon. Every year, dozens of heat-related worker fatalities occur in the U.S., often because of heavy physical work and lack of acclimatization. CDC and OSHA analyzed 25 heat-related illnesses at outdoor worksites between 2011 and 2016. In all of the fatalities, and in most of the non-fatal illnesses, the combination of air temperature, radiant heat, relative humidity, and physical activity exceeded CDC recommendations. Failure to follow the CDC guidelines caused serious illnesses and fatalities. Heat stroke fatalities occurred when the heat index was only in the mid-80 degrees Fahrenheit. These cases suggest that prevention programs should be triggered well below a heat index of 91 degrees F, which is the current OSHA heat-warning trigger.

Chagas Disease Surveillance Activities — Seven States, 2017

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As of 2017, six states conduct public health surveillance for Chagas disease because the insect carrying the disease can be found in those states. There are currently an estimated 300,000 people living with the disease in the U.S. Chagas disease is not a nationally notifiable condition, but it is a reportable disease in a limited number of states. Currently, an estimated 300,000 people are living in the U.S. who acquired the infection in Latin America. As of 2017, six states are conducting Chagas disease surveillance because transmission from triatomine “kissing” bugs to people can occur in their state, and there may be many people at risk for Chagas disease. States where vectorborne Chagas disease transmission can occur, and with large numbers of people at risk for Chagas disease, might consider conducting surveillance to help prevent disease caused by this parasitic infection.

Measles-Rubella Supplementary Immunization Activity Readiness Assessment — India, 2017–2018

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Two assessments of readiness for supplementary immunization activities (SIA) by independent partners led to timely corrective action and helped to improve readiness from 33 percent to 79 percent between the two assessments. This experience will help improve preparedness and ensure high-quality SIAs in the countries in the WHO South-East Asia Region as the region prepares to vaccinate >500 million children with measles-rubella vaccine through SIAs by 2019. India adopted the goal of measles elimination and rubella and congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) control by 2020. Achieving this goal requires SIAs using measles-rubella (MR) vaccine. Nationwide MR SIAs for children ages 9 months–14 years began in 2017and are to be completed by first quarter of 2019. SIAs require substantial preparation. To ensure high-quality SIAs, researchers performed an SIA readiness assessment. This report describes the process and experience of implementing SIA readiness assessments in three Indian states (Andhra Pradesh, Kerala, and Telangana).

 

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Page last reviewed: July 5, 2018