MMWR News Synopsis for June 14, 2018

Obesity Prevalence Among Adults Living in Metropolitan and Nonmetropolitan Counties – United States, 2016

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Obesity prevalence is significantly higher among adults living in nonmetropolitan counties than among those living in metropolitan counties. Understanding this health disparity can help inform interventions and targeting of obesity prevention resources. According to 2016 self-reported data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, obesity prevalence was significantly higher among adults living in nonmetropolitan counties (34.2%) than among those living metropolitan counties (28.7%). Obesity prevalence was significantly higher among nonmetropolitan county residents than among metropolitan county residents in all regions, with the largest absolute difference in the South (5.6 percentage points) and Northeast (5.4 percentage points). Obesity prevalence was also significantly higher among adults living in nonmetropolitan counties than among those living in metropolitan counties for most sociodemographic subgroups including those by age, sex, and household income.

Outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 Infections in a Rural Community – Utah and Arizona, June 2017

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To prevent illness, always wash your hands with soap and water after you have contact with cows and other farm animals or their environment. This report describes a 2017 outbreak of 12 E. coli O157:H7 infections that were likely linked to contact with animal manure. This outbreak is a reminder that healthy cows can carry germs like E. coli O157:H7. Cows can shed E. coli germs in their manure, contaminating the environment where they live and roam. People who have contact with these animals and their environment can get sick, especially young children. To prevent illness, always wash your hands with soap and water after you have contact with cows and other farm animals or their environment. Adults should supervise young children around these animals and help children wash their hands thoroughly.

Peer-Delivered Linkage Case Management and Same-Day ART Initiation for Men and Young Persons with HIV Infection – Eswatini, 2015-2017

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A CDC study in Eswatini (formerly Swaziland) suggests that providing peer-delivered, linkage case management helps nearly all people with HIV start treatment early, including those less likely to access treatment such as men and young adults. Delivered by HIV-positive peer counselors, linkage case management offers a package of services, such as counseling, HIV-care escort and treatment navigation, and follow-up support to help people enroll early in care following HIV diagnosis. The study showed that nearly all participants of CommLink, a community-based HIV testing and linkage program, received linkage case management. Nearly all enrolled in care and began treatment within a few days of receiving services. This research highlights approaches that countries can take to help all people diagnosed with HIV in community settings enroll in care and start treatment early.

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Page last reviewed: June 14, 2018