MMWR News Synopsis for May 31, 2018

Health Insurance Coverage by Occupation Among Adults Aged 18-64 Years – 17 States, 2013-2014

CDC Media Relations
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CDC researchers found that the overall percentage of workers aged 18‒64 years who did not have health insurance declined significantly from 16.0 percent in 2013 to 12.7 percent in 2014, but percentages varied significantly by occupation in both years. In 2014, the percentage of uninsured workers among broad occupational groups ranged from 2.7 percent to 37.0 percent. Identifying factors affecting differences in insurance rates by occupation might help to target interventions to reduce health disparities among U.S. workers. CDC researchers estimated the percentage of workers aged 18‒64 who did not have health insurance in 2013 and 2014 using data from 17 states in the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Workers were grouped into broad occupational categories. Being uninsured declined significantly overall from 16.0 percent in 2013 to 12.7 percent in 2014, but percentages varied significantly by occupation in both years. In 2014, the percentage of uninsured workers ranged from 2.7 percent among community and social services occupations and education, training, and library occupations to 37.0 percent among building and grounds cleaning and maintenance occupations. More than 25 percent of workers in four occupational groups were uninsured in 2014: construction and extraction; farming, fishing, and forestry; food preparation and serving related; and, the highest, building and grounds cleaning and maintenance.

Tobacco Product Use Among Youths With and Without Lifetime Asthma – Florida, 2016

CDC Media Relations
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Statewide tobacco prevention strategies, particularly among youth with asthma, coupled with other proven interventions, are critical to reducing all forms of tobacco product use among youth. Increasing availability of diverse tobacco products has led to complex tobacco product use patterns among youth. In 2016, Florida middle and high school students with asthma reported higher current use of all tobacco product types, including use of multiple tobacco products, compared with students without asthma. The higher use of all tobacco product types among students with asthma, most notably combustible products such as cigarettes, is concerning because the health risks associated with tobacco product use are higher for this population. As the diversity of tobacco products increases, efforts to educate youth about the health risks of all tobacco product types are warranted, particularly among those with asthma.

Progress Toward Rubella and Congenital Rubella Syndrome Control – South-East Asia Region, 2000-2016

CDC Media Relations
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Substantial progress has been made towards rubella and congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) control in the South-East Asia Region since 2000, with a 37 percent decrease in reported regional rubella incidence following introduction of rubella containing vaccine (RCV) in six additional countries, achievement of high routine RCV coverage after introduction, and enhancement of laboratory-supported surveillance. In 2013, the 66th session of the Regional Committee of the World Health Organization (WHO) South-East Asia Region (SEAR) adopted the goal of measles elimination and rubella and CRS control by 2020. Rubella infection is the leading vaccine-preventable cause of birth defects. Infection during pregnancy, especially during the first trimester, can result in miscarriage, fetal death, or a constellation of congenital malformations known as CRS. Substantial progress has been made towards rubella and CRS control in SEAR since 2000. During 2010-2016, reported rubella incidence decreased by 37 percent across the region. This report summarizes progress toward rubella and CRS control in SEAR during 2000–2016.

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Page last reviewed: May 31, 2018