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MMWR News Synopsis for November 16, 2017

Disparities in State-Specific Adult Fruit and Vegetable Consumption — United States, 2015

CDC Media Relations
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Only 1 in 10 adults eat more fruits and vegetables as recommended in the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Consumption was lower among men, young adults, and adults living at or close to the poverty level. Analysis of data from the 2015 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance system by state and key demographic variables confirmed that adults continue to consume too few fruits and vegetables. Overall in 2015, 12.2 percent of respondents met fruit intake recommendation and 9.3 percent met vegetable recommendation.

CDC Grand Rounds: Improving Medication Adherence for Chronic Disease Management — Innovations and Opportunities

CDC Media Relations
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Cardiovascular disease is the number one killer of U.S. men and women, and the number one cause of health inequalities. In many cases, premature deaths are preventable through lifestyle changes or managing medical conditions like high blood pressure. Health care systems – including doctors, nurses, pharmacists, community health workers, medical practices, hospitals, and insurers – can play a key role in improving medication adherence and blood pressure control nationwide. More than a quarter of Medicare Part D enrollees age 65 and older with a prescription for blood pressure medicine – about 5 million people – are not taking it properly, putting them at greater risk for heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, and death. This is a big problem involving a rapidly growing aging population that is already at increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Taking blood pressure medicine as directed – along with a healthy diet and exercise – is the key to improving high blood pressure, one of the most important steps Americans can take to enjoy longer, healthier lives.

Global Routine Vaccination Coverage, 2016

CDC Media Relations
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In recent years, vaccination coverage rates have remained the same. This suggests the need to improve access to and completion of vaccinations for hard-to-reach populations in order to reduce global morbidity and mortality from vaccine-preventable diseases. Substantial progress in global routine vaccination coverage has been made in the past 40 years since the establishment of the World Health Organization (WHO) Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI). In 2016, the global vaccination coverage rate with vaccines to prevent tuberculosis, diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, and measles was ≥85 percent. However, 33 percent of countries still are not meeting the target requirements needed to reach and sustain high vaccination coverage. Targeted strategies are needed to improve access to vaccination and to increase the number of children who are fully protected from vaccine-preventable diseases.

Rubella and Congenital Rubella Syndrome Control and Elimination — Global Progress, 2000–20165

CDC Media Relations
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The accelerated introduction of rubella-containing vaccine (RCV) into national immunization schedules is a significant step toward. rubella elimination. For regions to achieve rubella elimination, as has been achieved in the Americas, a strong commitment is required in all countries to introduce rubella-containing vaccine and increase the quality of rubella routine and campaign immunization activities. Countries and international partners should take advantage of opportunities provided by existing measles-elimination activities. Rubella is the leading vaccine-preventable cause of birth defects in the world. Rubella during pregnancy can cause miscarriage, fetal death, stillbirth, and congenital malformations known as congenital rubella syndrome (CRS). During 2000-2016, 53 countries introduced RCV into their national immunization schedules. By the end of 2016, 152 (78 percent) of 194 countries were using rubella vaccine. Reported rubella cases declined 97 percent, from 670,894 cases in 102 countries in 2000 to 22,361 cases in 165 countries in 2016. The WHO Americas region achieved rubella and CRS elimination in 2015, and 33 of 53 countries in the European region have eliminated endemic rubella and CRS. The Western Pacific Region also has a rubella elimination goal (no countries verified).

Notes from the Field:

  • none

Quick Stats:

  • Percentage of Adults Aged 20–64 Years Whose Blood Cholesterol Was Checked by a Health Professional, by Race/Ethnicity — National Health Interview Survey, 2011 and 2016

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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

CDC works 24/7 protecting America’s health, safety, and security. Whether diseases start at home or abroad, are curable or preventable, chronic or acute, stem from human error or deliberate attack, CDC is committed to respond to America’s most pressing health challenges.

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