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MMWR News Synopsis for January 12, 2017


 

State-Level Lifetime Medical and Work-Loss Costs of Fatal Injuries — United States, 2014

CDC Media Relations
404-639-3286

Injuries created a significant economic burden for states in 2014. The CDC Injury Center is releasing the first study estimating the economic burdens of injuries in the U.S.. The number and rate of fatal injuries and lifetime costs were calculated for each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia in 2014. The economic burdens of injuries differed greatly across states and resulted in substantial lifetime medical and work-loss costs. This suggests the need for effective injury-prevention strategies to help reduce these costs.

Prevalence of Perceived Food and Housing Security — 15 States, 2013

CDC Media Relations
404-639-3286

Food and housing security are essential for good health. However, recent data show that more than half of U.S. adults live in households struggling to find a nutritious food supply and safe, adequate housing. Working together, public health professionals, health care systems, and communities can help improve health by increasing access to affordable healthy foods and safe, affordable housing. Food and housing security are essential for good health. However, recent data show that more than half of U.S. adults live in households still struggling to find a nutritious food supply and safe, adequate housing. When people are constantly stressed or worried that they can’t afford nutritious food and adequate housing for their families, it’s hard for them to focus on making healthy choices. Also, this chronic stress can have a negative health impacts, including increased risk for cardiovascular disease, mental health problems, and adverse childhood experiences. Working together, public health professionals, health care systems, and communities can improve health by increasing access to affordable healthy foods and safe, affordable housing.

Using National Inpatient Death Rates as a Benchmark to Identify Hospitals with Inaccurate Cause of Death Reporting — Missouri, 2009–2012

Ryan Hobart, Public Information Officer
Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services
ryan.hobart@health.mo.gov
573-751-6003

Because cause of death data are widely used to direct local and national health policy, ongoing monitoring of accuracy of inpatient death reporting by public health agencies  is needed to improve reporting. Using CDC’s national inpatient hospital death rates as a benchmark, the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) analyzed inpatient death rates reported by hospitals with high inpatient death rates in St. Louis and Kansas City metro areas. Among the selected hospitals with high inpatient death rates, 45.8% of death certificates indicated an underlying cause of death that was inconsistent with CDC’s Guidelines for Death Certificate completion. Selected hospitals with high inpatient death rates were more likely to over report heart disease and renal disease, and underreport cancer as an underlying cause of death. The Missouri DHSS initiated a new web-based training module for death certificate completion based on the CDC guidelines in an effort to improve accuracy in cause of death reporting.

Guidance for Assessment of Poliovirus Vaccination Status and Vaccination of Children Who Have Received Poliovirus Vaccine Outside the United States

CDC Media Relations
404-639-3286

Public health authorities in the U.S. should continue to follow Advisory Committee for Immunization Practices recommendations regarding poliovirus vaccination to ensure that all children living in the U.S.  (including immigrants and refugees) are protected against all three poliovirus types. This report highlights recent changes in the global polio eradication program strategies and provides guidance to ensure adequate vaccination of children who might have received poliovirus vaccination outside the U.S. This guidance is not new policy and does not change the current recommendations for poliovirus vaccination in the U.S. Children living in the U.S. who might have received poliovirus vaccination outside the U.S. should have protection against all three poliovirus types by age-appropriate vaccination with IPV or trivalent oral polio vaccine. In the absence of vaccination records indicating receipt of these vaccines, vaccination or revaccination with the age-appropriate U.S. IPV schedule is recommended. Serology to assess immunity for children with no or questionable documentation of poliovirus vaccination will no longer be an available option and is no longer recommended.

Notes from the Field:

  • Pan-Nonsusceptible New Delhi Metallo-Beta-Lactamase-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae — Washoe County, Nevada, 2016
  • Occupational Lead Exposures at a Shipyard — Douglas County, Wisconsin, 2016

QuickStats:

  • Prevalence of Untreated Dental Caries in Permanent Teeth Among Children and Adolescents Aged 6–19 Years, by Age Group — National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, United States, 2011–2014

 

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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

CDC works 24/7 protecting America’s health, safety, and security. Whether diseases start at home or abroad, are curable or preventable, chronic or acute, stem from human error or deliberate attack, CDC is committed to respond to America’s most pressing health challenges.

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