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Stay cool, hydrated and informed this summer

A new study shows that heat-related deaths are on the rise. In a 2-week period in 2012, excessive heat exposure resulted in 32 deaths in 4 states, four times the typical average for those states for the same 2-week period from 1999-2009.

No one should die from a heat wave, but extreme heat causes more deaths than any other weather event. Extreme heat can lead to very high body temperatures, brain and organ damage, and even death. People suffer heat-related illness when their bodies are unable to properly compensate and cool themselves.

  • Stay cool by going to an air conditioned place and wearing light, loose clothing
  • Stay hydrated by drinking more water than usual and avoiding drinks with alcohol, caffeine, or carbonation
  • Stay informed by tuning in to heat-related alerts in your area
  • Watch for symptoms like muscle cramping, heavy sweating, rapid heartbeat, nausea, or fainting.

Protect yourself from extreme heat.  CDC offers new and updated resources to help doctors, local governments, and families prepare for extreme heat.

Contact Information

CDC Media Relations
(404) 639-3286
media@cdc.gov

Spokespersons

Robin Ikeda, MD, MPH

Robin Ikeda, MD, MPH

Biography

Robin Ikeda, MD, MPH

“Heat-related illnesses and deaths are preventable. Taking steps to stay cool, hydrated and informed in extreme temperatures can prevent serious health effects like heat exhaustion and heat stroke.”

Robin Ikeda, MD, MPH – Acting Director of the National Center for Environmental Health

George Luber, PhD

George Luber, PhD

Biography

Photo: George E. Luber, PhD

“Even though heat–related illnesses and deaths are preventable, extreme heat harms many people– especially certain groups, such as children and the elderly. Public education before the extreme heat season begins can reduce heat–related illness and death. CDC supports local health departments by providing resources they can use in their ongoing local outreach.”

George Luber, PhD – CDC′s Climate and Health program

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