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Zika Virus

CDC’s Emergency Operations Center is activated at Level 2 to respond to Zika. Zika is currently a risk in many countries and territories. Local transmission has also been reported in the United States. Zika infection during pregnancy can cause serious birth defects.

Spokespersons

Henry Walke, MD, MPH

 

Henry Walke, MD, PhD – Chief, Bacterial Special Pathogens Branch, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID)

Lyle R. Petersen, MD, MPH

Lyle R. Petersen, MD, MPH

Biography

Lyle R. Petersen, MD, MPH

“We are working with the Ministry of Health in Brazil and other international public health partners to investigate an unexpected increase in the number of babies being born with microcephaly to mothers who were infected with Zika virus during their pregnancy.”

Lyle R. Petersen, MD, MPH – Director, Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, NCEZID

Margaret (Peggy) Honein, PhD, MPH

Margaret (Peggy) Honein, PhD, MPH

Biography

Margaret (Peggy) Honein, PhD, MPH

“We are working to understand the possible link between Zika virus infection during pregnancy and microcephaly. We urgently need to understand the magnitude of the potential risk, and what factors might affect that risk such as when the infection occurs during pregnancy.”

Margaret (Peggy) Honein, PhD, MPH – Co-Team Lead, Pregnancy and Birth Defects Team, 2016 CDC Zika Virus Response Team

Related Links

Press Releases

Media Statements

Media Advisory

Media Advisory Transcripts

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