HIV and Hispanic/Latino People: Viral Suppression

Viral suppression is one of the six Ending the HIV Epidemic in the U.S. indicators. Viral suppression refers to the percentage of people with diagnosed HIV who have less than 200 copies of HIV per milliliter of blood.

EHE goal: increase the percentage of people with HIV who have are virally suppressed to 95 percent by 2025.
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It is important for Hispanic/Latino people to know their HIV status so they can take medicine to treat HIV if they have the virus. Taking HIV medicine every day can make the viral load undetectable. People who get and keep an undetectable viral load (or remain virally suppressed) can stay healthy for many years and have effectively no risk of transmitting HIV to their sex partners.

Hispanic/Latino People with Diagnosed HIV in 44 States and the District of Columbia, 2019*

* Hispanic/Latino people can be of any race.
 Had 2 viral load or CD4 tests at least 3 months apart in a year.
Based on most recent viral load test.

Source: CDC. Monitoring selected national HIV prevention and care objectives by using HIV surveillance data—United States and 6 dependent areas, 2019. HIV Surveillance Supplemental Report 2021;26(2).

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Many people with HIV experience challenges with achieving and maintaining viral suppression over time. Some of these challenges include missing HIV medical appointments, needing but not receiving other important health care services, or missing doses of HIV treatment.

Missed HIV Medical Care Appointments Among Hispanic/Latino People with Diagnosed HIV in the US, 2019*†

Staying in HIV care is important to achieving and maintaining viral suppression.

This chart shows 27 percent of Hispanic/Latino people missed at least 1 medical appointment in the past 12 months compared to 24 percent of people overall.

* Hispanic/Latino people can be of any race.
 Among people aged 18 and older.

Source: CDC. Medical Monitoring Project.

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Needed HIV Ancillary Care Services Among Hispanic/Latino People with Diagnosed HIV in the US, 2019*†‡

HIV ancillary care services are essential for supporting people in staying in HIV care and maintaining viral suppression.

This chart shows the top 3 services Hispanic/Latino people reported needing but not receiving in the past 12 months: dental care, SNAP or WIC, and mental health services.

Nearly half (45%) of all people with HIV needed at least 1 HIV ancillary care service in the past 12 months.

* Hispanic/Latino people can be of any race.
 Among people aged 18 and older.
HIV ancillary care services, such as case management and mental health services, are services that support retention in HIV care.

Source: CDC. Medical Monitoring Project.

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HIV Treatment Among Hispanic/Latino People with Diagnosed HIV in the US, 2019*†

Taking HIV medicine consistently and as prescribed is the best way to achieve and maintain viral suppression.

This chart shows 57 percent of Hispanic/Latino people reported taking all of their doses of HIV medicine compared to 61 percent of people overall.

* Hispanic/Latino people can be of any race.
 Among people aged 18 and older.

Source: CDC. Medical Monitoring Project.

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Depression and Anxiety Among Hispanic/Latino People with Diagnosed HIV in the US, 2019*†

People who experience symptoms of depression or anxiety may face challenges maintaining viral suppression.

This chart shows 22 percent of Hispanic/Latino people experienced symptoms of depression and anxiety in the past 12 months.

* Hispanic/Latino people can be of any race.
 Among people aged 18 and older.

Source: CDC. Medical Monitoring Project.

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Homelessness Among Hispanic/Latino People with Diagnosed HIV in the US, 2019*†

People who experience homelessness may find it difficult to get HIV care and treatment.

This chart shows 7 percent of Hispanic/Latino people reported homelessness compared to 9 percent of people overall.

* Hispanic/Latino people can be of any race.
 Among people aged 18 and older.

Source: CDC. Medical Monitoring Project.

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Median HIV Stigma Score Among Hispanic/Latino People with Diagnosed HIV in the US, 2019*†
This chart shows Hispanic/Latino people experienced HIV stigma.

NOTE: Ten-item scale ranging from 0 (no stigma) to 100 (high stigma) that measures personalized stigma, disclosure concerns, negative self-image, and perceived public attitudes about people with HIV.

* Hispanic/Latino people can be of any race.
 Among people aged 18 and older.

Source: CDC. Medical Monitoring Project.

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Deaths

In 2019, there were 3,047 deaths among Hispanic/Latino people with diagnosed HIV in the US and dependent areas. These deaths could be from any cause.

  1. CDC. Diagnoses of HIV infection in the United States and dependent areas, 2019. HIV Surveillance Report 2021;32.
  2. CDC. Estimated HIV incidence and prevalence in the United States, 2015–2019.pdf iconHIV Surveillance Supplemental Report 2021;26(1).
  3. CDC. Monitoring selected national HIV prevention and care objectives by using HIV surveillance data—United States and 6 dependent areas, 2019. HIV Surveillance Supplemental Report 2021;26(2).
  4. del Rio C. Latinos and HIV care in the Southeastern United States: New challenges complicating longstanding problems. Clin Infect Dis 2011;53(5):488-9. PubMed abstractexternal icon.