HIV and Hispanic/Latino Gay and Bisexual Men

Hispanic/Latinoa gay, bisexual, and other men who reported male-to-male sexual contactb are severely affected by HIV. In 2018, Hispanic/Latino gay and bisexual menc made up 21% of the 37,968 new HIV diagnosesd in the United States (US) and dependent areas.HIV diagnoses have remained stable in recent years among Hispanic/Latino gay and bisexual men overall.

The Numbers

HIV Diagnosesc

Of the 37,968 new HIV diagnoses in the US and dependent areas in 2018, 21 percent were among Hispanic/Latino gay and bisexual men.

New HIV Diagnoses Among Gay and Bisexual Men in the US and Dependent Areas by Race/Ethnicity, 2018

Hispanic/Latino gay and bisexual men continue to be heavily affected by HIV.

This bar chart shows HIV diagnoses among gay and bisexual men in the United States and dependent areas in 2018 by race. Black/African American gay and bisexual men made up 37 percent of new HIV diagnoses, Hispanic/Latino gay and bisexual men made up 30 percent, White gay and bisexual men made up 27 percent, Asian gay and bisexual men made up 3 percent, gay and bisexual men of multiple races made up 3 percent, American Indian/Alaska Native gay and bisexual men made up 1 percent and Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander gay and bisexual men made up less than 1 percent of new HIV diagnoses.

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* Black refers to people having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa. African American is a term often used for Americans of African descent with ancestry in North America.
† Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.
Source: CDC. Diagnoses of HIV infection in the United States and dependent areas, 2018 (updated)HIV Surveillance Report 2020;31.

New HIV Diagnoses Among Hispanic/Latino* Gay and Bisexual Men in the US and Dependent Areas by Age, 2018

About 2 out of 3 Hispanic/Latino gay and bisexual men who received an HIV diagnoses were aged 13 to 34.

This bar chart shows new HIV diagnoses among Hispanic/Latino gay and bisexual men in the United States and dependent areas in 2018 by age. Hispanic/Latino gay and bisexual men aged 13 to 24 made up 22 percent of new HIV diagnoses, Hispanic/Latino gay and bisexual men aged 25 to 34 made up 41 percent, Hispanic/Latino gay and bisexual men aged 35 to 44 made up 20 percent, Hispanic/Latino gay and bisexual men aged 45 to 54 made up 11 percent, and Hispanic/Latino gay and bisexual men aged 55 and older made up 5 percent of new HIV diagnoses.

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The numbers have been statistically adjusted to account for missing transmission categories. Values may not equal the subpopulation total.
*Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.
Source: CDC. Diagnoses of HIV infection in the United States and dependent areas, 2018 (updated)HIV Surveillance Report 2020;31.

From 2014 to 2018, HIV diagnoses remained stable among Hispanic/Latino gay and bisexual men overall. But trends varied by age.

HIV Diagnoses Among Hispanic/Latino Gay and Bisexual Men in the US and Dependent Areas, 2014-2018

This trend chart shows HIV diagnoses among Hispanic/Latino gay and bisexual men in the United States and dependent areas from 2014 to 2018. By age, HIV diagnoses decreased 8 percent among Hispanic/Latino gay and bisexual men aged 13 to 24; HIV diagnoses increased 12 percent among Hispanic/Latino gay and bisexual men aged 25 to 34; HIV diagnoses decreased 6 percent among Hispanic/Latino gay and bisexual men aged 35 to 44; HIV diagnoses remained stable among Hispanic/Latino gay and bisexual men aged 45 to 54; HIV diagnoses increased 29 percent among Hispanic/Latino gay and bisexual men aged 55 and older.

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* Changes in subpopulations with fewer HIV diagnoses can lead to a large percentage increase or decrease.
Source: CDC. Diagnoses of HIV infection in the United States and dependent areas, 2018 (updated)HIV Surveillance Report 2020;31.

Living With HIV

Hispanic/Latino Gay and Bisexual Men With HIV

At the end of 2018, an estimated 1.2 million Americans had HIV in the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Of those, 186,900 were Hispanic/Latino gay and bisexual men.

4 in 5 Hispanic/Latino gay and bisexual men knew they had the virus.

graphic of a bottle of pills

It is important for Hispanic/Latino gay and bisexual men to know their HIV status so they can take medicine to treat HIV if they have the virus. Taking HIV medicine every day can make the viral load undetectable. People who get and keep an undetectable viral load (or stay virally suppressed) can live a long and healthy life. They also have effectively no risk of transmitting HIV to HIV-negative sex partners.

Compared to all people with diagnosed HIV in 41 states and the District of Columbia, Hispanic/Latino gay and bisexual men have about the same viral suppression rates. For every 100 Hispanic/Latino gay and bisexual men with diagnosed HIV in 2018, 74 received some HIV care, 59 were retained in care, and 66 were virally suppressed. For comparison, for every 100 people overall with diagnosed HIV, 76 received some HIV care, 58 were retained in care, and 65 were virally suppressed.

Compared to all people with diagnosed HIV in 41 states and the District of Columbia, Hispanic/Latino gay and bisexual men have about the same viral suppression rates. For every 100 Hispanic/Latino gay and bisexual men with diagnosed HIV in 2018, 74 received some HIV care, 59 were retained in care, and 66 were virally suppressed. For comparison, for every 100 people overall with diagnosed HIV, 76 received some HIV care, 58 were retained in care, and 65 were virally suppressed.

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* Includes infections attributed male-to-male sexual contact only. Among Hispanic/Latino men with HIV attributed to male-to-male sexual contact and injection drug use, 10 in 11 knew they had HIV.
 Had 2 viral load or CD4 tests at least 3 months apart in a year.
 Based on most recent viral load test.
** Learn more about CDC’s two different HIV care continuum approaches at www.cdc.gov/hiv/pdf/library/factsheets/cdc-hiv-care-continuum.pdf pdf icon[PDF – 247 KB].
Source: CDC. Estimated HIV incidence and prevalence in the United States 2014–2018 pdf icon[PDF – 3 MB]HIV Surveillance Supplemental Report 2020;25(1).
Source: CDC. Monitoring selected national HIV prevention and care objectives by using HIV surveillance data—United States and 6 dependent areas, 2018 pdf icon[PDF – 4 MB]. HIV Surveillance Supplemental Report 2020;25(2).
Source: CDC. Selected national HIV prevention and care outcomes pdf icon[PDF – 2 MB]. (slides).

Deaths c

In 2018, there were 1,504 deaths among Hispanic/Latino gay and bisexual men with diagnosed HIV in the US and dependent areas. These deaths could be from any cause.

Prevention Challenges

icon of stop sign with stigma text

Racism, discrimination, HIV stigma, and homophobia can negatively impact risk-taking behaviors, knowledge of HIV status, HIV care, and other needed services for many Hispanic/Latino gay and bisexual men.

icon of two men

Hispanic/Latino gay and bisexual men are more likely to report that their last sex partner was older, compared to white or African American gay and bisexual men. Having older partners may increase the likelihood of being exposed to HIV because an older partner is more likely to have had more sexual partners or other risks and is more likely to have HIV.

icon of prep pill

PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis) use is less common among Hispanic/Latino gay and bisexual men. According to a report pdf icon[PDF – 1 MB], only 21% of Hispanic/Latino gay and bisexual men took PrEP compared to 31% of white gay and bisexual men. If taken as prescribed, PrEP is highly effective for preventing HIV.

icon of a person and a question mark

Poverty, migration patterns, lower educational level, and language barriers may make it harder for some Hispanic/Latino gay and bisexual men to get HIV testing and care.

icon of a passport

Some Hispanic/Latino gay and bisexual men may not use HIV prevention services, get an HIV test, or get treatment if they have HIV due to fear of disclosing their immigration status.

icon of a man with question marks

People who don’t know they have HIV cannot get the medicine they need to stay healthy and prevent transmitting HIV to their partners. Therefore, they may transmit the infection to others without knowing it.

What CDC Is Doing

CDC is pursuing a high-impact HIV prevention approach to maximize the effectiveness of HIV prevention interventions and strategies. Funding state, territorial, and local health departments and community-based organizations (CBOs) to develop and implement tailored programs is CDC’s largest investment in HIV prevention. This includes longstanding successful programs and new efforts funded through the Ending the HIV Epidemic initiative. In addition to funding health departments and CBOs, CDC is also strengthening the HIV prevention workforce and developing HIV communication resources for consumers and health care providers.

  • Under the integrated HIV surveillance and prevention cooperative agreement, CDC awards around $400 million per year to health departments for HIV data collection and prevention efforts. This award directs resources to the populations and geographic areas of greatest need, while supporting core HIV surveillance and prevention efforts across the US.
  • In 2019, CDC awarded $12 million to support the development of state and local Ending the HIV Epidemic plans in the nation’s 57 priority areas. To further enhance capacity building efforts, CDC uses HIV prevention resources to fund the National Alliance of State and Territorial AIDS Directors (NASTAD) with $1.5 million per year to support strategic partnerships, community engagement, peer-to-peer technical assistance, and planning efforts.
  • In 2020, CDC awarded $109 million to 32 state and local health departments that represent the 57 jurisdictions across the United States prioritized in the Ending the HIV Epidemic initiative. This award supports the implementation of state and local Ending the HIV Epidemic plans.
  • Under the flagship community-based organization cooperative agreement, CDC awards about $42 million per year to community organizations. This award directs resources to support the delivery of effective HIV prevention strategies to key populations.
  • In 2017, CDC awarded nearly $11 million per year for 5 years to 30 CBOs to provide HIV testing to young gay and bisexual men of color and transgender youth of color, with the goal of identifying undiagnosed HIV infections and linking those who have HIV to care and prevention services.
  • In 2019, CDC awarded a cooperative agreement to strengthen the capacity and improve the performance of the nation’s HIV prevention workforce. New elements include dedicated providers for web-based and classroom-based national training, and technical assistance tailored within four geographic regions.
  • CDC is funding a demonstration project in 4 jurisdictions to identify active HIV transmission networks and implement HIV interventions for Hispanic/Latino gay and bisexual men. Activities include assessing transmission and risk networks, HIV testing, and linking people with HIV to care and treatment.
  • Through its Let’s Stop HIV Together (Detengamos Juntos el VIH) campaign, CDC offers English and  Spanish resources about HIV stigma (estigma), testing (prueba), prevention (prevención), and treatment (tratamiento). Our Spanish campaign resources are created in Spanish or transcreated (tailored and recreated) to meet the cultural needs of Hispanics/Latinos. This campaign is part of the Ending the HIV Epidemic initiative.

a Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.
b The term male-to-male sexual contact is used in CDC surveillance systems. It indicates a behavior that transmits HIV infection, not how individuals self-identify in terms of their sexuality. This web content uses the term gay and bisexual men to represent gay, bisexual, and other men who reported male-to-male sexual contact aged 13 and older.
c Includes infections attributed to male-to-male sexual contact and injection drug use (men who reported both risk factors).
d HIV diagnoses refers to the number of people who received an HIV diagnosis during a given time period, not when the people got HIV infection.
e Unless otherwise noted, the term United States (US) includes the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and the 6 dependent areas of American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, the Republic of Palau, and the US Virgin Islands.

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