HIV and African American Gay and Bisexual Men: HIV Risk Behaviors

The risk of getting or transmitting HIV varies widely depending on the type of exposure or behavior. Most commonly, people get or transmit HIV through anal or vaginal sex, or sharing needles, syringes, or other drug injection equipment—for example, cookers.

Sexual Behaviors Among Black/African American Gay and Bisexual Men in 23 US Cities, 2017*†‡
17 percent of African American gay and bisexual men without HIV had sex with a partner who has HIV or an unknown HIV status without using a condom.

Black  refers to people having origins in any of the Black racial groups of Africa. African American  is a term often used for people of African descent with ancestry in North America.
Among gay and bisexual men aged 18 and older.
Only 19% of Black/African American gay and bisexual men without HIV reported using PrEP.
Source: CDC. HIV infection risk, prevention, and testing behaviors among men who have sex with men—National HIV Behavioral Surveillance, 23 U.S. cities, 2017. HIV Surveillance Supplemental Report 2019;22.

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Sexual Behaviors Among Black/African American Gay and Bisexual Men with Diagnosed HIV in the US, 2019*†
Getting and keeping an undetectable viral load is the best way for people with HIV to stay healthy and protect others.
6 percent of African American gay and bisexual men with HIV had sex without using any HIV prevention strategy compared to 7 percent of people overall.

* Black  refers to people having origins in any of the Black racial groups of Africa. African American  is a term often used for people of African descent with ancestry in North America.
Among people aged 18 and older.
Had sex while not virally suppressed with a partner whose HIV status was negative or unknown, a condom was not used, and the partner was not taking PrEP.
Source: CDC. Medical Monitoring Project.

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