National Viral Hepatitis Progress Report

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) strives to prevent viral hepatitis infections and eliminate disease and mortality caused by viral hepatitis. The National Viral Hepatitis Progress Report provides information on progress in the implementation of recommended interventions and the impact these interventions are having on prevention of viral hepatitis transmission, disease, and associated mortality. This year, CDC modified the goals and associated targets from previous reports to align them with CDC’s Division of Viral Hepatitis 2025 Strategic Plan pdf icon[PDF – 3 MB].

Report At-A-Glance

Ten indicators provide an objective way to assess progress toward achieving key viral hepatitis goals.  Select the indicator from the table below for more information.

Seven standardized viral hepatitis indicators
Baseline
2017 data year
2018 Observed
(Annual Target*)
2025 Goal
2023 data year
Status
Reduce estimated new hepatitis A virus infections by ≥40%  6,700  24,900
(6,250)
4,000 X on red, indicating 'Not met—no change or moved away from annual target'
Reduce estimated new hepatitis B virus infections by ≥20%  22,200  21,600
(21,500)
18,000 arrow on yellow, indicating 'Not Met - moved toward annual target'
Reduce reported rate of new hepatitis B virus infections among persons who inject drugs by ≥25%  1.4 1.2
(1.3)
1.0 Check on Green, indicating 'Met or exceeded current annual target'
Reduce reported rateof hepatitis B-related deaths by ≥20%  0.46  0.43
(0.45)
0.37 Check on Green, indicating 'Met or exceeded current annual target'
Reduce reported rate of hepatitis B-related deaths among Asians and Pacific Islanders by ≥25%  2.45  2.10
(2.35)
1.84 Check on Green, indicating 'Met or exceeded current annual target'
Reduce estimated new hepatitis C virus infections by ≥20%  44,700  50,300
(43,083)
35,000 X on red, indicating 'Not met—no change or moved away from annual target'
Reduce reported rate of new hepatitis C virus infections among persons who inject drugs by ≥25%  2.3  2.6
(2.2)
1.7 X on red, indicating 'Not met—no change or moved away from annual target'
Reduce reported rate of hepatitis C-related deaths by ≥20%  4.13  3.72
(3.94)
3.00 Check on Green, indicating 'Met or exceeded current annual target'
Reduce reported rate of hepatitis C-related deaths among American Indians and Alaska Natives by ≥30%  10.24  9.05
(9.73)
7.17 Check on Green, indicating 'Met or exceeded current annual target'
Reduce reported rate of hepatitis C-related deaths among non-Hispanic Blacks by ≥30%  7.03 6.31
(6.68)
4.92 Check on Green, indicating 'Met or exceeded current annual target'
*Annual targets assume a constant (linear) rate of change from the observed baseline (2017) to the 2025 goal (2023 data year).
†The number of estimated viral hepatitis infections was determined by multiplying the number of reported cases by a factor that adjusted for under-ascertainment and under-reporting (CDC 2018 Surveillance Summary and Klevens, et al, 2014).
‡Per 100,000 U.S. population.
¶Persons aged 18–40 years serve as a proxy for persons who inject drugs.
Index of indicators
Check on Green, indicating 'Met or exceeded current annual target'Met or exceeded current annual target Arrow on yellow, indicating 'Not Met - moved toward annual target' Moving toward annual target, but annual target was not fully met X on red, indicating 'Not met—no change or moved away from annual target'Annual target was not met and has not changed or moved away  from annual target

The ten indicators and accompanying 2025 goals compiled specifically for the National Progress Report are consistent with the CDC’s Division of Viral Hepatitis 2025 Strategic Plan pdf icon[PDF – 3 MB].

  • The large increase in hepatitis A for 2018 is associated with ongoing, widespread person-to-person outbreaks. These outbreaks are occurring among high-risk adults and demonstrate the importance of vaccination as well as public health surveillance to identify and respond to outbreaks of hepatitis A.
  • Only minimal progress is being made in reducing the incidence of new hepatitis B virus infections overall. However, new infections among people who inject drugs (PWID) and among Asians and Pacific Islanders have decreased, along with hepatitis B-related deaths overall. Continued efforts to increase infant and at-risk adult vaccination rates and improve appropriate testing and linkage to care are needed.
  • Of great concern are the ongoing and apparent large increases in the incidence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections. The lack of a hepatitis C vaccine and increases in injection-drug use related to the nation’s opioid crisis have contributed to these increases in acute hepatitis C. Efforts to curb HCV transmission and identify all new (acute) and existing (chronic) infections must continue to improve access to well-tolerated, short-course treatments that can cure almost all HCV-infected persons.
  • Like hepatitis B, the nation continues to make progress towards reducing deaths related to hepatitis C; however, continued efforts are needed to identify new and chronic infections and ensure that all people with viremia, including PWID, receive curative therapy.

Fact Sheet

2020 National Viral Hepatitis Progress Report Fact Sheet pdf icon[PDF – 179 KB]

Previous Reports

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2019 National Viral Hepatitis Progress Report Fact Sheetpdf icon was published in 2019 and included data through 2017.

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2018 National Viral Hepatitis Progress Report Fact Sheetpdf icon was published in 2018 and included data through 2016.

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Progress Toward Viral Hepatitis Elimination in the United States pdf icon[PDF – 46 pages] was the inaugural report published in 2017 that included data through 2015. The comprehensive report highlighted the nation’s progress at the time toward reducing the burden of hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C.