Frequently Asked Questions: Promoting Adolescent Health through School-Based HIV Prevention (CDC-RFA-PS18-1807)

The following topics contain frequently asked questions (FAQs) about funding for Promoting Adolescent Health through School-Based HIV Prevention (CDC-RFA-PS18-1807).

Contact John Canfield to access the informational call recordings.

Q1: Can my agency apply for Component 1 funding and use the funding for surveillance other than the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) or School Health Profiles (Profiles)?

A1: No. Component 1 funding is intended only for the administration, dissemination, and use of the YRBS and Profiles. Support for any other school-based surveillance activities with these funds is prohibited.

Q2: Our education agency does not conduct the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) as we use another statewide survey, can we use funds to complete School Health Profiles (Profiles)? Our education agency does not conduct School Health Profiles (Profiles) as we use another statewide survey, can we still use funds to complete the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS)?

A2: While agencies are encouraged to apply for funding for both YRBS and Profiles, education or health agencies in jurisdictions that are not applying for Component 2 funding are permitted to apply for a reduced amount of funding under Component 1 for a single survey (either YRBS or Profiles). Component 1 funding is intended only for the administration, dissemination, and use of the YRBS and Profiles. Support for any other school-based surveillance activities with these funds is prohibited.

Q3: My local education agency (LEA) is the lead partner on a LEA consortium application. Should surveillance activities be representative of the consortium or of each partner LEA?

A3: Surveillance activities should be representative of the consortium rather than the individual LEA. That is, for School Health Profiles, samples will be drawn to represent all secondary schools in the consortium, and for the Youth Risk Behavior Survey, samples will be drawn to represent all high school students in the consortium.

Q4: Are there any meetings early in the project period for which I should save the dates on my calendar?

A4: Yes. All awardees funded for Component 1 who were not funded for Strategy 1 under PS13-1308 will be required to send the person designated as their Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) coordinator to a training workshop in Rockville, MD on August 28 and 29, 2018. Travel costs for this workshop will be paid through CDC’s technical assistance contractor.

Q5: Are grantees funded ONLY for Component 1 required to attend the September 24-26, 2018 orientation?

A5: No. Component 1-only recipients are not required to attend the September 24-26, 2018 orientation.

Q6: Are grantees funded ONLY for Component 1 who are ONLY using funding to support implementation of School Health Profiles (Profiles) required to attend the YRBS training workshop on August 28-29, 2018?

A6: No. Recipients who are only funded to support implementation of Profiles are not required to attend the YRBS training workshop on August 28-29, 2018.

Q7: Can you pay for staffing from a Component 1 budget?

A7: Yes.

Q8: Can Component 1 funding be used for sub-sampling for the Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO) DP18-1801 from the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP)?

A8: Yes. Component 1 funding can be used for any sub-sampling that can inform the jurisdiction’s programmatic efforts. Recipients will work with CDC post-award on budget specifics related to this option.

Q9: What percentage of the budget must you allocate for Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) and School Health Profiles (Profiles) surveys?

A9: The percentage of budget allocated for the YRBS and Profiles is up to the funded recipient.

Q10: Can you travel out of state on Component 1 funds?

A10: No. Out-of-state travel is not allowed with Component 1 funds.

Q11: Are the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) questions on page 11 required for state education agencies (SEA)?

A11: No. The questions are required for local education agencies (LEA) funded under Component 2 to obtain and maintain funding for Component 2. Those agencies must include those questions on their 2019, 2021, and 2023 YRBS questionnaires.

Q12: If a state implements the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) and School Health Profiles (Profiles), will a local education agency (LEA) funded under Component 2 also be required to implement YRBS and Profiles?

A12: Yes. If a LEA is funded for Component 2, that district must implement both Profiles and YRBS even if that district’s state is also implementing Profiles and YRBS. CDC will work closely with states and districts when this occurs to ensure that schools are surveyed only once and data are shared appropriately.

Q13: Are surveillance activities for high school only?

A13: No. School Health Profiles (Profiles) must be administered to a representative sample of schools serving students in any of grades 6-12 (e.g., middle schools, high schools, junior/senior high schools) in the recipient’s jurisdiction. For Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS), recipients are required to administer the survey to a representative sample of high school students in the jurisdiction, but also have the option of administering the YRBS to a representative sample of middle school students.

Q14: Does CDC plan to continue providing Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) sample frame assistance, data cleaning, and data analysis for jurisdictions who do not apply for PS18-1807 funding?

A14: No.

Q15: Can you confirm that the surveys administered under Component 1 of the HIV School-Based Prevention will still be scanned, results compiled, and weighted data provided by the CDC contractor?

A15: Yes. Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) and School Health Profiles (Profiles) questionnaires will be scanned by the CDC contractor. Assuming the recipient obtains the required response rate and provides the required documentation as described in the Handbook for Conducting Youth Risk Behavior Surveys and the Handbook for Conducting School Health Profiles, then the data will be weighted by the contractor and a report of the results will be compiled and provided to the recipient.

Q16: Page 11 of the Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO) indicates there are certain required questions that recipients must include in the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) questionnaire. Are recipients permitted to use only these nine required YRBS questions, without addressing the other topics covered by the full YRBS survey?

A16: No. All recipients are required to use two thirds of the questions on the standard YRBS questionnaire that will be available by August. More information about this can be found in the Handbook for Conducting Youth Risk Behavior Surveys. In addition to the standard questions, local education agencies (LEA) funded under Component 2 must also include the questions included on page 11 of the NOFO.

Q17: Are recipients permitted to add locally-produced questions to the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) questions?

A17: Yes. Recipients are permitted to add questions to their YRBS questionnaire, but they must adhere to specific parameters as described in the Handbook for Conducting Youth Risk Behavior Surveys.

Q18: Are we expected to administer the entire Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) or only the questions listed under required activities on page 11 of the Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO)?

A18: All recipients of Component 1 funding are required to use two thirds of the questions on the standard YRBS questionnaire, which will be available by August. More information about this can be found in the Handbook for Conducting Youth Risk Behavior Surveys. In addition to the standard questions, local education agencies (LEA) funded under Component 2 must also include the questions noted on page 11 of the NOFO.

Q19: If our education or health agency has the capacity to conduct the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) online, is it permissible to propose to do it in that manner for this funding opportunity?

A19: Beginning with the 2019 YRBS cycle, CDC will allow state education agencies (SEA) and local education agencies (LEA) that have previously conducted a YRBS the option of doing their survey online. As with School Health Profiles (Profiles), online administration of an SEA/LEA’s YRBS will require CDC and Westat approval prior to survey administration. Recipients will be required to meet certain technical specifications according to a strict timeline before that approval is given.

Q1: Why did you change your funding strategy for Component 2 (formerly Strategy 2 in 1308) from a combination of state education agencies (SEA) and local education agencies (LEA) to funding LEA only?

A1: School curricula, policies, and services are generally locally determined under the organization of LEA. For this reason, CDC will implement the bulk of its primary HIV/STD prevention programming for school-age youth through LEA. SEA play an important role in creating support environments for LEA to implement the goals of CDC funding. Rather than fund a small portion of SEA directly, this funding announcement will make support available to all 50 SEA indirectly through the training and capacity building award of Component 3E “Addressing Policy and Practice in States.” Through Component E, all 50 SEA will have the opportunity to send a state team for in-person training and receive ongoing technical assistance.

Q2: Are there any requirements to use evidence-based intervention (EBI)?

A2: There are no requirements to use evidence-based interventions (EBI). However, they may be used to supplement an already existing Health/Sexual Health Education program.

Q3: Do local education agencies (LEA) need to select at least 10,000 students in a subset of the middle/high schools in their district as “priority” schools?

A3: Yes. Page 12 of the Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO) states the following:

“For the purposes of this NOFO, each recipient must select a minimum of 10 priority schools (high schools, or a combination of middle and high schools) in which to implement all required activities before diffusing those activities to as many middle and high schools in the district as possible.”

Also on page 12 the NOFO further states the following:

“The total number of students reached through priority schools must be at least 10,000.”
CDC will work with funded LEA to finalize priority school selection post-award.

Q4: For local education agencies (LEA) applying as a consortium of districts, does “District Level” on the chart equate to “Consortium Level” (meaning all districts in consortium)?

A4: Yes. “District Level” on the chart equates to “Consortium Level” for consortium applications.

Q5: Are there any requirements for the number of priority schools in each district for a consortium application?

A5: Yes. Page 12 of the Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO) states the following:

“For the purposes of this NOFO, each recipient must select a minimum of 10 priority schools (high schools, or a combination of middle and high schools) in which to implement all required activities before diffusing those activities to as many middle and high schools in the district as possible.”

This language applies to the consortium applications as well.

Q6: Can the number of students in priority schools (10,000) be duplicated?

A6: No. The total number of students reached through priority schools must be at least 10,000 non-duplicated students.

Q7: Are you required to reach 10,000 students each year or over the 5 years?

A7: The total number of students reached through priority schools must be at least 10,000 per year.

Q8: Does the Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO) require a minimum or maximum number of priority schools?

A8: Yes. For the purposes of this NOFO, each recipient must select a minimum of 10 priority schools (high schools, or a combination of middle and high schools) in which to implement all required activities before diffusing those activities to as many middle and high schools in the district as possible. Epidemiologic and social determinants data should be used to select priority schools in which youth are at high risk for HIV and other STDs. Applicants may choose to include alternative schools, charter schools, magnet schools, and other non-traditional schools in their priority school selections. CDC will work with funded local education agencies (LEA) to finalize priority school selection post-award.

Q9: Can the budget support for evaluation exceed 6%?

A9: Yes.

Q10: Can priority schools consist of middle and high schools?

A10: Yes. For the purposes of this Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO), each recipient must select a minimum of 10 priority schools (high schools, or a combination of middle and high schools) in which to implement all required activities before diffusing those activities to as many middle and high schools in the district as possible.

Q11: Is it okay to only have 10 middle and high schools in your district?

A11: Yes, if the total number of students reached through priority schools will be at least 10,000. Local education agencies (LEA) with an enrollment of less than 10,000 students may combine with other geographically contiguous districts to create a consortium application. In doing so, the consortium must designate a single LEA to submit the application and, if funded, administer the program.

Q12: Are local education agencies (LEA) required to have a Memorandum of Understanding/Agreement (MOU/A) with the State Education Agency (SEA) in their jurisdiction for Component 1 or Component 2?

A12: No. The required MOU/A is between the LEA and corresponding public health agency. See pages 23 and 44 of the NOFO for more detail.

Q13: Local education agencies (LEA) are expected to select “priority” schools for PS18-1807. The Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO) says that priority schools are schools in which youth are at high risk for HIV infection and other STD. What does “high risk” mean? Does that refer to a particular threshold infection rate? Can you clarify what qualifies as high risk and how that informs school selection for Component 2 work?

A13: Activities in priority schools are the required activities that are initially implemented within a subset of schools in a district before expanding to as many middle and high schools in the district as possible. For the purposes of this NOFO, each recipient must select a minimum of 10 priority schools (high schools, or a combination of middle and high schools) in which to implement all required activities before diffusing those activities to as many middle and high schools in the district as possible. Epidemiologic and social determinants data should be used to select priority schools in which youth are at high risk for HIV infection and other STD. Applicants may choose to include alternative schools, charter schools, magnet schools, and other non-traditional schools in their priority school selections. CDC will work with funded LEA to finalize priority school selection post-award. The total number of students reached through priority schools must be at least 10,000. If an LEA does not have a student population of 10,000 students, more than one LEA can collaborate to submit a joint application. An example of an activity in priority schools is to provide professional development to teachers on classroom management. Refer to pages 12 and 24 of the NOFO for similar information.

Q14: Do you have to keep the same number of priority schools over the whole 5 years?

A14: For evaluation purposes, priority schools should remain as consistent as possible throughout the 5 year time frame.
For the purposes of this NOFO, each recipient must select a minimum of 10 priority schools (high schools, or a combination of middle and high schools) in which to implement all required activities before diffusing those activities to as many middle and high schools in the district as possible. Epidemiologic and social determinants data should be used to select priority schools in which youth are at high risk for HIV infection and other STD. Applicants may choose to include alternative schools, charter schools, magnet schools, and other non-traditional schools in their priority school selections. CDC will work with funded LEA to finalize priority school selection post-award.

Q15: Are program evaluation activities for both middle and high schools?

A15: Yes.

Q16: In the application it says, “each recipient must select a minimum of 10 priority schools in which to implement all required activities before diffusing those activities to as many middle and high schools in the district as possible.” When we select our priority schools in the beginning of the award, are they our only priority schools for the remainder of the cooperative agreement? Or do we add more as we diffuse activities?

A16: Yes. The priority schools chosen at the beginning are the only priority schools for the remainder of the cooperative agreement. CDC will work with funded local education agencies (LEA) to revise or update their list of proposed priority schools post-award.

For evaluation purposes, priority schools should remain as consistent as possible throughout the 5-year time frame. Recipients will not add more priority schools as they diffuse activities.

Q17: If we propose to reach 15,000 students from 20 priority schools in the application, but plan to increase that number the following year to reach 25,000 students from 30 schools, will those 10 new schools become priority schools?

A17: No. For evaluation purposes, priority schools should remain as consistent as possible throughout the 5-year time frame.

For the purposes of scoring the application during the competitive process, only the population proposed to be reached in year 1 will be considered.

Q18: Will we have to report data on all schools in which we implement activities throughout the course of the cooperative agreement or just those initial priority schools selected in the beginning?

A18: Your agency will provide evaluation data on your priority schools on a semi-annual basis and Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) and School Health Profiles (Profiles) data will be collected for all secondary schools in the district.

Q19: How long must required activities be implemented in priority schools before being diffused to all schools in the district?

A19: Required activities in all secondary schools are ready for diffusion to all middle and high schools in the district after they have been refined and successfully implemented in priority schools. Diffusion may happen over time reaching as many middle and high schools in the district as possible over the 5-year award period. The decision to implement activities in additional schools will be done in consultation with CDC and will be based on readiness and potential for impact.

Q20: Will there be additional funds to take Component 2 Strategies (Strategy 2A – Sexual Health Education (SHE); Strategy 2B – Sexual Health Services (SHS); and Strategy 2C – Safe and Supportive Environments (SSE)) to scale across the school district?

A20: Each year of the cooperative agreement, recipients will receive an established amount of funds for the year. In the earlier years of the cooperative agreement, these funds will primarily be used to work with the identified priority schools in the district. In later years, recipients are expected to take Strategies to scale to additional schools in the district using the funds allocated in the cooperative agreement. These expansion efforts will occur after recipient discussions with the assigned DASH program consultant.

Q21: How does a funded local education agency (LEA) develop and approve a list of instructional competencies to be demonstrated by individuals who teach sexual health education?

A21: Funded LEA are expected to identify a list of instructional competencies, or skills, to be demonstrated by individuals teaching sexual health education. “Instructional competency” is defined on page 87 of the Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO). Recipients should reference appropriate evidenced-based and practice-informed approaches to effective instructional delivery in sexual health education. CDC will work with funded LEA to revise or update their list of instructional competencies post-award.

Q22: In Approach SHE 2A, bullet 5 (page 14) regarding Instructional program development, revision, or selection-is a Local Education Agency (LEA) expected to undergo a review for the SHE portion of comprehensive health education?

A22: Yes. Funded LEA are expected to systematically evaluate the selected sexual health education program or curriculum. CDC recommends using the CDC/DASH Health Education Curriculum Analysis Tool (HECAT) to determine appropriateness of SHE program for intended adolescent populations.

Q23: Does the expectation about setting up a curriculum review mentioned on page 14 of the Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO) apply to local education agencies (LEA) that are already satisfied with their instructional program choices?

A23: Yes. DASH will encourage recipients to review their existing sexual health education curriculum with the CDC/DASH Health Education Curriculum Analysis Tool (HECAT) to assess coverage of the recommended content at each grade span. The LEA may also choose to use other national documents, such as the National Health Education Standards and the National Sexuality Education Standards, to assess the content in their current sexual health education curriculum.

Q24: Can CDC research, identify, assess, and recommend additional classroom-based sexual health education (SHE) instructional programs, including those that are part of the required comprehensive health education course? If not, are funded education agencies expected to assess the instructional program using the CDC/DASH Health Education Curriculum Analysis Tool (HECAT), the National Health Education Standards, or the National Sexuality Education Standards?

A24: CDC cannot identify specific curricula/programs that are to be used by funded partners. This is a local decision. However, we recommend that a team of community members and district personnel utilize the HECAT to assess health education and sexual health education curricula/programs that would best meet the needs of the community and school district in alignment with the Strategy 2A Required Activities (pages 13-14).

Q25: Page 14 under Required Activities and page 92 under Appendix A reads, “Develop, revise, or select a sexual health education instructional program.” In some states, sexual health education (SHE) may be one required component of comprehensive health education. Does this Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO) support school systems where SHE is not a stand-alone curriculum, but is a part of the comprehensive, skills-based health education course?

A25: Yes. DASH encourages school districts to nest their SHE curriculum within a broader health education curriculum. DASH funding will focus on the SHE component of the broader skills-based health education curriculum.

Q26: Can a funded local education agency (LEA) use the National Health Education Standards, National Sexuality Education Standards, or the CDC/DASH Health Education Curriculum Analysis Tool (HECAT) to inform our work?

A26: Yes.

Q27: Is it permissible for the local health department in the recipient’s jurisdiction to establish a School Health Advisory Council (SHAC) instead of the local education agency (LEA)?

A27: Yes, provided that the education agency is engaged and the School Health Advisory Council (SHAC) work is connected to the activities outlined in the application to DASH.

Q28: Can the HIV Materials Review Panel also serve as the School Health Advisory Council (SHAC)?
Can the School Health Advisory Council (SHAC) serve as the HIV Materials Review Panel?

A28: Yes. This is a common practice across the country. Committees/Councils often serve multiple roles.

Q29: What are the expectations for actively integrating parents in sexual health education (SHE) instructional programs? Can you confirm that these expectations differ from past funding announcements and give examples of effective initiatives?

A29: The expectations for integrating and engaging parents are different from those in past funding announcements. The types of initiatives the applicant agency implements need to be determined by the agency. A definition of parent engagement in schools is included on page 88 of the Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO) along with additional information provided on CDC’s Promoting Parent Engagement in Schools to Prevent HIV and other STDs among TeensCdc-pdf resource.

Q30: What if an applicant is already using a scope and sequence? Does the applicant still need to develop and approve another based on the required activities for Strategy 2A?

A30: No. The Sexual Health Education (SHE) scope and sequence document should be updated to reflect instructional priorities under Strategy 2A – SHE activities. CDC will work with funded LEA to revise or update their SHE scope and sequence document post-award.

Q31: Are applicants expected to choose one approach (2A, 2B, or 2C) or should they use all three?

A31: Applicants for Component 2 are expected to address all three strategies of Component 2. Refer to pages 12-15 of the Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO) for a description of the required activities for Component 2. Page 12 states:

“The Component 2 required activities are listed by strategy: Strategy 2A – Sexual Health Education (SHE); Strategy 2B – Sexual Health Services (SHS); and Strategy 2C – Safe and Supportive Environments (SSE). Collectively, these required activities are intended to strengthen staff capacity, increase student access to programs and services, and engage parent and community partners.

These three strategies were selected based on evidence of effectiveness and evidence that they address known risk or protective factors. The Sexual Health Education (SHE) strategy is intended to help adolescents acquire the essential knowledge and critical skills needed to prevent HIV, STD, and teen pregnancy. The Sexual Health Services (SHS) strategy is intended to increase adolescents’ access to key sexual health services including HIV and other STD testing. The Safe and Supportive Environments (SSE) strategy is intended to increase adolescents’ connectedness to their school and increase parental monitoring and communication.”

Q32: Can our priority schools be ALL of our high schools? Or do we need a comparison group?

A32: Page 12 of the Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO) states the following:

“For the purposes of this NOFO, each recipient must select a minimum of 10 priority schools (high schools, or a combination of middle and high schools) in which to implement all required activities before diffusing those activities to as many middle and high schools in the district as possible. Epidemiologic and social determinants data should be used to select priority schools in which youth are at high risk for HIV infection and other STD. Applicants may choose to include alternative schools, charter schools, magnet schools, and other non-traditional schools in their priority school selections. CDC will work with funded LEA to finalize priority school selection post-award. The total number of students reached through priority schools must be at least 10,000.”

The NOFO does not mention a comparison group.

Q33: Concerning Component 2, can the local education agency (LEA) hire one full-time employee (FTE) or three part-time employees (PTE) that equals one FTE?

A33: Yes. Page 54 of the Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO) states the following:

“CDC requires applicants for Components 2 and 3 to allocate at least one full-time employee (FTE) to be included in the applicant’s itemized budget and corresponding budget narrative. This 1.0 FTE position could be split among up to three staff, by effort, or among the three strategy areas for Component 2.”

Q1: Why does PS18-1807 include Component 3D (Training and Technical Assistance for School-Based Substance Use Approaches) if funding is not currently available for it?

A1: The purpose of 18-1807 is to “improve the health and well-being of our nation’s youth by working with education and health agencies, and other organizations to reduce HIV, STD, teen pregnancy, and related risk behaviors among middle and high school students.” Substance use is one such related risk behavior. All successful applications will be categorized as “Approved But Unfunded.” CDC’s current guidelines allow for such applications to remain active for up to two years. If funding does become available during that time frame, CDC will award Component 3D as outlined in the PS18-1807 NOFO.

Q2: Are inventories for Component 3 expected to cover similar topics as School Health Policies and Practices Study (SHPPS) and School Health Profiles (Profiles), or is it expected to be more limited in scope?

A2: To fulfill the inventory requirement, Component 3 recipients will gather program information annually from Component 2 LEA recipients.

Q3: Can you clarify what is meant by “ensuring subject matter experts (SME) are accessible to project participants”?

A3: Recipients funded for Component 3A, 3B, 3C, and 3D are expected to have a SME available to the Component 2 LEA funded recipients. The decision of how to provide a SME is to be made by the prospective applicants.
Page 15 of the Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO) states:

“Components 3A, 3B, 3C, and 3D recipients are expected to work with all Component 2 LEA recipients. However, this support will vary across LEA based on those recipients’ current capacity and need. Component 3 applicants should include a tiered plan to build the capacity of up to 35 LEA funded for Component 2 that includes technical assistance, specialized capacity building, and intensive program implementation support. CDC will work with these Component 3 recipients post-award to determine the degree to which the Component 3 recipients will work with each of the Component 2 recipients, in conjunction with the tiered approach.”

Q4: Are you required to set aside 6% of the budget for the evaluation activity?

A4: Yes. 6% is the minimum to set aside for evaluation.

Q5: Can the budget support for evaluation exceed 6%?

A5: Yes.

Q6: For Component 3E on page 21 the Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO) has a required activity for training that states “Identifying gaps between model policy development and program implementation.” Who will complete this activity?

A6: The recipient of Component 3E funding will convene multiple in-person trainings for 50 state-level teams culminating in action plans that address identified gaps between model policy development and program implementation for the state-level teams in attendance.

Q7: Can you define the difference between technical assistance, specialized capacity building, and intensive program implementation support?

A7:

Technical Assistance: Targeted support provided to an individual or group of individuals with the intent to increase knowledge and skills to strengthen an organization’s capacity to achieve PS18-1807 Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO) goals. Support may be provided through professional development events, technical assistance, the provision of guidance and resource materials, or referrals to other agencies or organizations.

Capacity Building: The process of improving an organization’s ability to achieve its mission. It includes increasing skills and knowledge; increasing the ability to plan and implement programs, practices, and policies; increasing the quality, quantity, or cost-effectiveness of programs, practices, and policies; and increasing the sustainability of infrastructure or systems that support programs, practices, and policies.

Intensive program implementation support is not defined in the NOFO. The applicant should propose in their application how they plan to implement intensive program implementation support.

Q1: What is a Data Management Plan?

A1: A Data Management Plan (DMP) is a plan to preserve data collected (such as surveillance or evaluation data) and make it available for public use. 1807 recipients will receive guidance on creating a DMP for all data collection activities so that they can submit a DMP 6 months after award. For more information about CDC’s policy on the DMP, see https://www.cdc.gov/grants/additionalrequirements/ar-25.html.

Q2: What is the difference between the Data Management Plan (DMP) and the Evaluation Plan?

A2: The Data Management Plan (DMP) is a federal requirement to plan to preserve and share with the public all data collected, including surveillance and evaluation data. The Evaluation Plan refers only to program and performance measurement and includes what data will be collected, how it will be collected, who will collect it, and on what schedule. It does not apply to surveillance data. The DMP and Evaluation Plan are separate documents, and both will be required six months after the start of NOFO PS18-1807.

Q3: Except for the grantee orientation on September 24-26, 2018, I do not see additional travel requirements. Should we plan for travel in addition to the grantee orientation?

A3: Page 54 of the Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO) addresses the travel requirements of the initial application:

“Components 2 and 3 applicants should also budget for CDC-required and other approved professional development events that require in-person attendance.

In addition, all recipients are required to attend a grantee orientation September 24-26, 2018, at the CDC main campus in Atlanta. This travel should be reflected in the itemized budget and corresponding budget narrative.”

Information about budget is repeated on page 70:

“Components 2 and 3 applicants should also budget for CDC-required and other approved professional development events that require in-person attendance.

In addition, all recipients are required to attend a grantee orientation September 24-26, 2018, at the CDC main campus in Atlanta. This travel should be reflected in the itemized budget and corresponding budget narrative. See “Budget Narrative” on pages 53-54 for further information on budgets.”

Q4: Will an Institutional Review Board (IRB) be needed for PS18-1807?

A4: Regarding Component 1, CDC does not require IRB review for state, territorial, tribal, or district surveillance. All recipients, however, must follow any requirements that their jurisdiction has for IRB review.

Regarding Component 2 and 3, to date DASH is not aware of required evaluation activities needing IRB approval. Program evaluation has typically been exempted because it is not considered to be research.

Q5: The Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO) indicates short-term outcomes and intermediate outcomes are both to be achieved by the end of the 5-year grant period. Can you confirm that they share the same timeline but are defined as short and intermediate?

A5: Yes. We expect short and intermediate outcomes will be achieved by the end of the 5-year grant period. Short-term outcomes are likely to be achieved earlier in the 5-year period than intermediate-term outcomes.

Q6: Can you highlight areas of where and/or how PS18-1807 builds on the work of PS13-1308?

A6: Under PS18-1807, DASH continues to support education agencies to implement sexual health education, sexual health services and safe and supportive environments. We continue to see the value of identifying priority schools for piloting new approaches and establishing best practices. However, unlike PS13-1308, we also expect that over the course of the 5-year period those activities will be disseminated and implemented district-wide across the funded local education agencies (LEA). In an effort to support all 50 state education agencies, we will fund a partner with national reach to deliver intensive training and technical assistance to state education agencies (SEA).

Q7: How many conferences/professional development events should we plan for Component 2 (in addition to the orientation in September)?
How many conferences/professional development events should we plan for Component 3 (in addition to the orientation in September)?

A7: All recipients are required to attend a recipient orientation September 24-26, 2018, at the CDC main campus in Atlanta, Georgia. This travel should be reflected in the itemized budget and corresponding budget narrative. Aside from the recipient orientation, the number of conferences/professional development events are not yet determined. If your organization is funded, you will have some budget flexibility post award to attend these events.

Please send any additional questions to John Canfield at qzc6@cdc.gov.