YRBS Data Summary & Trends

CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report Surveillance Summary on the 2017 National Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) provides the most recent surveillance data on health behaviors and experiences among high school students across the country. It reports on risks that contribute to the leading causes of death and disability among youth and young adults.

Trends Report

The Youth Risk Behavior Survey Data Summary and Trends Report uses YRBS data to focus on four priority focus areas associated with STDs, including HIV, and unintended teen pregnancy:

  • Sexual Behavior
  • High-Risk Substance Use
  • Violence Victimization, and
  • Mental Health and Suicide.

To raise awareness and understanding, this report presents the 2017 data by sex, by race/ethnicity, and for sexual minority youth. The report looks at the past decade and examines linear YRBS trends for each focus area.

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Trends Fact Sheets
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The Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System was developed in 1990 to monitor health behaviors that contribute markedly to the leading causes of death, disability, and social problems among youth in the United States. These behaviors are often established during childhood and early adolescence and can continue into adulthood. These fact sheets include trends from 1991-2017 related to behaviors associated with HIV, STDs, and unintended teen pregnancy.

Infographics

HEALTH OF HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS: YOUTH RISK BEHAVIOR SURVEY RESULTS Although progress has been made, there are still too many students reporting risky sexual behaviors, high-risk substance use, violence victimization, and poor mental health, including suicide risk. HIGH-RISK PROGRESS SUBSTANCE USE  PROGRESS Fewer students have ever used illicit drugs.* *cocaine, heroin, methamphetamines, inhalants, hallucinogens, or ecstasy. 2007 - 23% compared to 2017 -14%  CHALLENGES Nearly 1 in 7 students have ever misused prescription opioids. 14% in 2017  WHY IS THIS INFORMATION IMPORTANT? These health risk behaviors and experiences can lead to HIV, other sexually transmitted diseases, and pregnancy. WHAT CAN BE DONE? SCHOOLS, FAMILIES, AND COMMUNITIES CAN WORK TOGETHER TO POSITIVELY AFFECT STUDENTS’ HEALTH. RESOURCES Learn more about student health behaviors on CDC’s Healthy Youth website (www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth).  Source: CDC, YRBS Data Summary & Trends Report: 2007-2017
HEALTH OF HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS: YOUTH RISK BEHAVIOR SURVEY RESULTS Although progress has been made, there are still too many students reporting risky sexual behaviors, high-risk substance use, violence victimization, and poor mental health, including suicide risk. MENTAL HEALTH PROGRESS Most students experience positive mental health. Adults can sup port students’ mental health by watching for warning signs and linking students to help.  CHALLENGES During the past year, almost 1 in 3 students persistently felt sad or hopeless. 29% in 2007 compared to 32% in 2017  Students who made a suicide plan: 11% in 2007, 14% in 2017  WHY IS THIS INFORMATION IMPORTANT? These health risk behaviors and experiences can lead to HIV, other sexually transmitted diseases, and pregnancy. WHAT CAN BE DONE? SCHOOLS, FAMILIES, AND COMMUNITIES CAN WORK TOGETHER TO POSITIVELY AFFECT STUDENTS’ HEALTH. RESOURCES Learn more about student health behaviors on CDC’s Healthy Youth website (www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth).  Source: CDC, YRBS Data Summary & Trends Report: 2007-2017
HEALTH OF HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS: YOUTH RISK BEHAVIOR SURVEY RESULTS Although progress has been made, there are still too many students reporting risky sexual behaviors, high-risk substance use, violence victimization, and poor mental health, including suicide risk. SEXUAL BEHAVIORS  PROGRESS Fewer students are having sex.   48% in 2007 compared to 40% in 2017   Fewer students have had 4 or more sex partners. 15% in 2007 compared to 10% in 2017  CHALLENGES Fewer students who have sex are using condoms. 62% in 2007 compared to 54% in 2017  WHY IS THIS INFORMATION IMPORTANT? These health risk behaviors and experiences can lead to HIV, other sexually transmitted diseases, and pregnancy. WHAT CAN BE DONE? SCHOOLS, FAMILIES, AND COMMUNITIES CAN WORK TOGETHER TO POSITIVELY AFFECT STUDENTS’ HEALTH. RESOURCES Learn more about student health behaviors on CDC’s Healthy Youth website (www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth).  Source: CDC, YRBS Data Summary & Trends Report: 2007-2017
HEALTH OF HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS: YOUTH RISK BEHAVIOR SURVEY RESULTS Although progress has been made, there are still too many students reporting risky sexual behaviors, high-risk substance use, violence victimization, and poor mental health, including suicide risk. VIOLENCE VICTIMIZATION  PROGRESS Fewer male students are bullied at school. 19% in 2007, 16% in 2017  Fewer students experience sexual dating violence.  10% in 2013, 7% in 2017  CHALLENGES About 1 in 5 students are still bullied at school. 20% in 2007, 19% in 2017  More than 1 in 10 female students have ever been forced to have sex. 11% in 2007 and 2017  WHY IS THIS INFORMATION IMPORTANT? These health risk behaviors and experiences can lead to HIV, other sexually transmitted diseases, and pregnancy. WHAT CAN BE DONE? SCHOOLS, FAMILIES, AND COMMUNITIES CAN WORK TOGETHER TO POSITIVELY AFFECT STUDENTS’ HEALTH. RESOURCES Learn more about student health behaviors on CDC’s Healthy Youth website (www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth).  Source: CDC, YRBS Data Summary & Trends Report: 2007-2017