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CDC National Health Report Dashboards

The following tables give an at-a-glance indication of our nation’s public health successes and challenges in recent years. For each indicator, progress was assessed based on year-to-year (trend) data, though only baseline and most current years are reported in dashboards. The related resources listed below each table provide in-depth information and tools to drive further success.

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Premature Mortality

Americans are living longer than ever before. Babies born in 2011 can expect to live an average of 79 years. Life expectancy at birth in the U.S. has increased by one year since 2005. For more information, see complete table and related resources.
Life ExpectancyBaseline 2005Status 2012Progress
Life expectancy at birth, in years77.678.8  	Progress made
MortalityBaseline 2005Status 2012Progress
Number of Premature Deaths (before age 80)1,365,8161,389,330  	Insufficient progress made
Total Years of Potential Life Lost before age 75 for all causes of death7,315.76,588.0  	Progress made
Years of Life Lost by Leading Cause of DeathBaseline 2005Status 2012Progress
1. Heart Disease1,107.5951.9  	Progress made
2. Cancers1,519.81,356.2  	Progress made
3. Chronic lower respiratory diseases180.1171.6  	Insufficient progress made
4. Stroke192.9161.6  	Progress made
5. Unintentional Injuries1,137.21,046.1  	Insufficient progress made
6. Alzheimer’s disease11.711.0  	Insufficient progress made
7. Diabetes179.4164.3  	Insufficient progress made
8. Pneumonia and flu83.667.4  	Insufficient progress made
9. Kidney disease74.265.2  	Insufficient progress made
10. Suicide348.9402.1  	Trend in wrong direction

 

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Leading Causes of Death

The 10 leading causes of death have changed little in recent years. Seven of the top 10 causes of death are chronic diseases. Heart disease and cancer remain the top 2 causes of death, accounting for half of all deaths in the United States. If current trends continue, cancer may soon replace heart disease as the leading cause of death. Suicide joined the ranks among the top 10 in 2008. For more information, watch the new video, “The Road to Longevity & Health” and see complete table and related resources.

Trends in Age-Adjusted Death Rates (per 100,000 persons), 2005-2011
Key IndicatorsBaseline 2005Status 2012Progress
1. Heart Disease216.8170.5  	Progress made
2. Cancers185.1166.5  	Progress made
3. Chronic lower respiratory diseases43.941.5  	Insufficient progress made
4. Stroke48.036.9  	Progress made
5. Unintentional injuries39.539.1  	Insufficient progress made
6. Alzheimer’s disease24.023.8  	Insufficient progress made
7. Diabetes mellitus24.921.2  	Progress made
8. Pneumonia and flu21.014.4  	Progress made
9. Kidney disease14.713.1  	Progress made
10. Suicide10.912.6  	Trend in wrong direction

 

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Obesity

Obesity rates remain high, with more than one-third of U.S. adults (34.9%) and approximately 17% (or 12.7 million) of children and adolescents obese. For more information, see complete table and related resources for prevention and control.

ObesityBaseline 2006Status 2012Progress
Percent of adults (ages 20+) who are obese34.3%34.9%  	Insufficient progress made
Percent of youth (ages 2-19) who are obese15.4%16.9%  	Insufficient progress made

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Physical Activity

Physical activity among adults and high school students remains low. Approximately one in five persons 18 years or older currently meet the federal guidelines for physical activity. For more information, see complete table and related resources.

Physical Activity20052013Progress
Percent of adults who met the federal physical activity guidelines16.6%20.7%  	Progress made
Percent of high school students who are physically active at least 1 hour a day, seven days a week17.9%27.1%  	Progress made

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Nutrition

Good nutrition is vital for the healthy growth and development of children, and for good health and disease prevention as we grow older. Yet average consumption of fruits and vegetables among adults and children remain low. For more information, see complete table and related resources.

Nutrition20062010Progress
Average daily fruit intake (per 1,000 calories consumed) per person (ages 2+)0.5 cups0.6 cups  	Insufficient progress made
Average daily vegetable intake (per 1,000 calories consumed) per person (ages 2+)0.8 cups0.8 cups  	Insufficient progress made

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Tobacco Use

Tobacco smoking causes extensive damage to smokers and to nonsmokers who are exposed to secondhand smoke. Yet, 1 in 4 adults still smokes. For more information, see complete table and related resources for prevention and control.

Tobacco Use20052012*Progress
Annual per capita cigarette consumption1,7161,196  	Insufficient progress made
Percent of adults who are current cigarette, cigar or pipe smokers (age-adjusted)28.0%25.2%  	Insufficient progress made
Percent of high school students who are current cigarette smokers23.0%15.7% (2013)  	Progress made
Percent of children (3-11 years) exposed to secondhand smoke50.8% (2006)41.3%  	Progress made

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Heart Disease and Stroke

We have made great progress in the prevention and control of heart disease and stroke in recent years. Yet, only about half of Americans with high blood pressure have it under control, which is an important part of preventing heart disease. For more information, see complete table and related resources for prevention and control.

Heart Disease and StrokeBaseline 2006Status 2012*Progress
Blood Pressure Control
Percent of adults with high blood pressure who have it controlled (<140/90)
36.5%46.3%  	Insufficient progress made
Cholesterol Control
Percent of adults with high LDL-Cholesterol who have it controlled
22.3%29.5%  	Insufficient progress made
Aspirin Use
Percent of high-risk adults (post event/diagnosis) who use aspirin
46.1%53.8% (2010)  	Progress made
Sodium Intake
Daily amount of sodium (mg) consumed in food, per person (ages 2+)
3,4363,463 (2010)  	Trend in wrong direction

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Cancer

We’ve made great progress in the prevention and control of certain cancers, but Americans are not making use of key cancer prevention tools, including screening and HPV vaccination. For more information, see complete table and related resources for prevention and control.

CancerBaseline 2006*Status 2012Progress
Colorectal Cancer Screening
Percent of adults (ages 50-75) receiving recommended colorectal cancer screening (age-adjusted)
60.9% (2008)65.1%  	Progress made
Cervical Cancer Screening
Percent of women (ages 21-65) receiving a Pap test, past 3 years
87.8%83.8%  	Trend in wrong direction
Breast Cancer Screening
Percent of women (ages 50-74) receiving a mammogram, past 2 years (age-adjusted)
81.6%78.8%  	Trend in wrong direction
Cancer Vaccination
Percent of adolescent girls (13-15years) receiving 3 doses of HPV vaccine
16.6% (2008)32.7% (2013)  	Insufficient progress made

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Diabetes

Diabetes can cause serious health complications including heart disease, blindness, kidney failure, and lower-extremity amputations. For more information, see complete table and related resources for prevention and control.

DiabetesBaseline 2008Status 2012Progress
Percent of adults with diabetes who do not have it under control (A1c value >9%)
(age-adjusted)
17.9%21.0%N/A
Number of adults with diabetes who do not have it under control (A1c value >9%) (in thousands)2,3002,600N/A

Data are based on 4-year data due to limited sample size of the population (limited to people with diabetes), resulting in more stable and reliable estimates. Data are reported in the table under the last year for which the data are reported (e.g., 2005-2008 data is captured as 2008 and 2009-2012 data is captured as 2012).

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Asthma

Asthma is a chronic condition that can limit quality of life, causing repeated episodes of wheezing, breathlessness, chest tightness, and coughing . For more information, see complete table and related resources for prevention and control.

AsthmaBaseline 2005Status 2010Progress
Number of hospitalizations for asthma489,000439,000  	Insufficient progress made

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Excessive Alcohol Use

Binge drinking is associated with many health problems, including unintentional injuries, sexually transmitted infections, high blood pressure, stroke, and poor diabetes control. For more information, see complete table and related resources for prevention and control.

Excessive Alcohol UseBaseline 2005*Status 2013*Progress
Binge Drinking Among Adults
Percentage of adults engaging in binge drinking, past 30 days
27.1% (2008)27.1% (2012) 	Trend in wrong direction
Binge Drinking Among High School Students
Percentage of high school students engaging in binge drinking, past 30 days
25.5%20.8% 	Progress made
Drunk Driving Among Adults
Number of fatalities in motor vehicle crashes with driver blood alcohol concentration (BAC) > 0.08
13,5829,878
(2011)
	Progress made
Drunk Driving Among High School Students
Percent of high school students engaging in drinking and driving, past 30 days
9.9%10.0%  	Insufficient progress made

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Influenza

Pneumonia and influenza are the eighth leading cause of death in the U.S. Increasing flu vaccination among children and adults can help make us a healthier nation. For more information, see complete table and related resources for prevention and control.

InfluenzaBaseline 2009*Status 2012Progress
Percent of children ages 6 months-17 years receiving ≥ 1 dose of influenza vaccine per influenza season43.7%56.6%  	Progress made
Percent of adults receiving influenza vaccination40.4%41.5%  	Insufficient progress made
Percent of healthcare personnel receiving influenza vaccination63.4%72.0%  	Progress made
Percent of pregnant women receiving influenza vaccination49.0% (2010)50.5%  	Insufficient progress made

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Foodborne Illnesses

Foodborne illnesses are estimated to affect one in six U.S. residents each year. Safe food handling and continued public health collaborations can help prevent outbreaks and ensure safer systems. For more information, see complete table and related resources for prevention and control.

Foodborne IllnessesBaseline 2005Status 2013*Progress
Rate of Listeria infection in the population (cases per 100,000 population)0.290.26  	Insufficient progress made
Rate of Salmonella infection in the population (cases per 100,000 population)14.5315.19  	Insufficient progress made
Rate of Salmonella serotype Enteritidis (SE) infection in the population (cases per 100,000 population)2.452.59 (2012)  	Insufficient progress made
Rate of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157 infection in the population (cases per 100,000 population)1.061.15  	Trend in wrong direction

*Unless otherwise noted. Please note: 2013 data is preliminary and reflects the most currently available data.

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Healthcare-Associated Infections

Prevention of infection is crucial in a time of increasing antibiotic resistance. Continued public health collaborations can help prevent and control healthcare-associated infections. For more information, see complete table and related resources for prevention and control.

Healthcare-Associated InfectionsBaseline 2008*Status 2012Progress
Central Line-associated Blood Stream Infection (CLABSI), standardized infection ratio (SIR)1.000.56  	Progress made
Catheter-associated Urinary Tract Infections (CAUTI), SIR1.00 (2009)1.03  	Trend in wrong direction
Hospital admission and readmission due to Surgical Site Infections (SSI), SIR1.000.80  	Progress made
Hospital onset of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile), SIR1.00 (2011)0.98N/A
Incidence of healthcare-associated invasive Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections (rate per 100,000 persons)27.0818.74  	Progress made

*Unless otherwise noted.

The Standardized Infection Ratio (SIR) is calculated by dividing the actual (observed) infections by the expected infections using data gathered through the CDC National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN).

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HIV

Despite progress in curbing HIV transmission and increased case identification through targeted screening efforts, nearly 50,000 people still acquire HIV each year, and 1 in 6 persons who have it are unaware of their infection. For more information, see complete table and related resources for prevention and control.

HIVBaseline 2006Status 2010Progress
Number of new HIV infections in the U.S. (persons ages 13+)48,60047,500  	Trend in wrong direction
Rate of HIV transmission among adolescents and adults (per 100 persons, age 13+, who have HIV)4.64.2  	Progress made
Percent of people living with HIV who know their serostatus (persons ages 13+)80.9%84.2%  	Progress made

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Chlamydia

Chlamydia is mostly asymptomatic and often goes undiagnosed. Increased screening efforts, an essential component in preventing further spread of chlamydia, have identified more cases in recent years. These higher rates may reflect better prevention efforts. For more information, see complete table and related resources for prevention and control.

ChlamydiaBaseline 2005Status 2012Progress
Rate of Chlamydia in women ages 15-19 (per 100,000 population)27333291.5  	Trend in wrong direction
Rate of Chlamydia in women ages 20-24 (per 100,000 population)2667.93695.5  	Trend in wrong direction

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Hepatitis C

Increased screening efforts have identified more hepatitis C cases in recent years. Despite these efforts, deaths from hepatitis C are expected to rise in the coming decades, as many individuals (who remain undiagnosed and untreated) grow older and develop serious complications. For more information, see complete table and related resources for prevention and control.

Hepatitis CBaseline 2005Status 2012Progress
Number of new cases of Hepatitis C6941,778  	Trend in wrong direction
Number of Hepatitis C deaths11,84917,721 (2011)  	Trend in wrong direction

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Maternal & Child Health

The health of mothers and their children is a critical foundation for the health of our next generation. It impacts families, communities, and the healthcare system. Infant survival has reached an all-time high in the U.S., while the proportion of babies born to teen mothers has reached a record low. Child vaccinations are at an all-time high and breastfeeding is on the rise, though only half of U.S. infants are breastfed up to 6 months of age. For more information, see complete table and related resources.

IndicatorBaseline 2005*Status 2012Progress
Infant death rate (<1 year)6.96.0  	Progress made
Number of infant deaths28,44023,629  	Progress made
Rate of teen births among females ages 15 to 19 (per 1,000 female population)39.726.6 (2013)  	Progress made
Percent of infants that are breastfed at six months42.9%49.4% (2011)  	Progress made
Percent of children ( 19-35 months) receiving universally recommended doses of vaccines (DTaP, polio, MMR, Hib, Hep B, varicella, PCV )44.3% (2009)70.4% (2013)  	Progress made
Number of children ages 1 to 5 with blood lead levels greater than 5 µg/dL654,703 (2008)535,699 (2010)N/A

*Unless otherwise noted

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Progress Key

  	Progress made Progress

  	Insufficient progress made Insufficient Progress

  	Trend in wrong direction Trend in wrong direction

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