Data on Leading Causes of Death among Females and Males in 2017 - Text Version

Slide 1 (Title slide)

Leading Causes of Death Among Females and Males

United States, 2017

Office of Women’s Health, Office of Minority Health and Health Equity, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The following slides present data on the top ten leading causes of death among females and males in the United States in 2017. Additional data can be found on the following websites:

  1. Females
  2. Males

Additional information on methodology can be found in the report “Deaths: Leading Causes for 2017”pdf icon

Slide 2

The following slides highlight selected similarities and differences in leading causes of death in 3 sections*:

  1. In females and males overall
  2. In females and males, by race and Hispanic origin
  3. In females and males, by age group

*Note: The following slides highlight selected examples of similarities and differences in leading causes of death by sex, race and Hispanic origin, and age. There may be additional similarities and differences of importance that are not explicitly highlighted.

Slide 3

In 2017, heart disease and cancer (i.e., malignant neoplasms) were the top two leading causes of death for both females and males. Heart disease accounted for 21.8% of deaths among females and 24.2% of deaths among males. Cancer accounted for 20.7% of deaths among females and 21.9% of deaths among males.

Heart disease: females: 21.8%, males: 24.2%.

Cancer: females: 20.7%, males: 21.9%.

Unintentional injuries: females: 4.4%, males: 7.6%.

Chronic lower respiratory diseases: males: 5.2%, females: 6.2%.

Stroke: males: 4.3%, females: 6.2%.

Alzheimer’s disease: males: 2.6%, females: 6.1%.

Diabetes: females: 2.7%, males: 3.2%.

Suicide: males: 2.6%. Suicide was not among the top ten leading causes of death for females.

Influenza and pneumonia: males 1.8%, females: 2.1%.

Kidney disease: females: 1.8%. Kidney disease was not among the top ten leading causes of death for males.

Chronic liver disease: males: 1.8%. Chronic liver disease was not among the top ten leading causes of death for females.

Septicemia: females: 1.6%. Septicemia was not among the top ten leading causes of death among males.

Slide 4

Kidney disease (i.e., nephritis, nephrotic syndrome and nephrosis) and septicemia were among the top ten leading causes of death among females but not among males. Kidney disease accounted for 1.8% and septicemia accounted for 1.6% of deaths among females.

Heart disease: females: 21.8%, males: 24.2%.

Cancer: females: 20.7%, males: 21.9%.

Unintentional injuries: females: 4.4%, males: 7.6%.

Chronic lower respiratory diseases: males: 5.2%, females: 6.2%.

Stroke: males: 4.3%, females: 6.2%.

Alzheimer’s disease: males: 2.6%, females: 6.1%.

Diabetes: females: 2.7%, males: 3.2%.

Suicide: males: 2.6%. Suicide was not among the top ten leading causes of death for females.

Influenza and pneumonia: males 1.8%, females: 2.1%.

Kidney disease: females: 1.8%. Kidney disease was not among the top ten leading causes of death for males.

Chronic liver disease: males: 1.8%. Chronic liver disease was not among the top ten leading causes of death for females.

Septicemia: females: 1.6%. Septicemia was not among the top ten leading causes of death among males.

Slide 5

Suicide (i.e., intentional self-harm) and chronic liver disease (i.e., chronic liver disease and cirrhosis) were among the top ten leading causes of death among males but not among females. Suicide accounted for 2.6% and chronic liver disease accounted for 1.8% of deaths among males.

Heart disease: females: 21.8%, males: 24.2%.

Cancer: females: 20.7%, males: 21.9%.

Unintentional injuries: females: 4.4%, males: 7.6%.

Chronic lower respiratory diseases: males: 5.2%, females: 6.2%.

Stroke: males: 4.3%, females: 6.2%.

Alzheimer’s disease: males: 2.6%, females: 6.1%.

Diabetes: females: 2.7%, males: 3.2%.

Suicide: males: 2.6%. Suicide was not among the top ten leading causes of death for females.

Influenza and pneumonia: males 1.8%, females: 2.1%.

Kidney disease: females: 1.8%. Kidney disease was not among the top ten leading causes of death for males.

Chronic liver disease: males: 1.8%. Chronic liver disease was not among the top ten leading causes of death for females.

Septicemia: females: 1.6%. Septicemia was not among the top ten leading causes of death among males.

Slide 6

Alzheimer’s disease, stroke (i.e., cerebrovascular diseases), and chronic lower respiratory diseases accounted for a higher percentage of deaths among females than males. Alzheimer’s disease accounted for 6.1% of deaths among females and 2.6% of deaths among males. Stroke accounted for 6.2% of deaths among females and 4.3% of deaths among males. Chronic lower respiratory diseases accounted for 6.2% of deaths among females and 5.2% of deaths among males.

Heart disease: females: 21.8%, males: 24.2%.

Cancer: females: 20.7%, males: 21.9%.

Unintentional injuries: females: 4.4%, males: 7.6%.

Chronic lower respiratory diseases: males: 5.2%, females: 6.2%.

Stroke: males: 4.3%, females: 6.2%.

Alzheimer’s disease: males: 2.6%, females: 6.1%.

Diabetes: females: 2.7%, males: 3.2%.

Suicide: males: 2.6%. Suicide was not among the top ten leading causes of death for females.

Influenza and pneumonia: males 1.8%, females: 2.1%.

Kidney disease: females: 1.8%. Kidney disease was not among the top ten leading causes of death for males.

Chronic liver disease: males: 1.8%. Chronic liver disease was not among the top ten leading causes of death for females.

Septicemia: females: 1.6%. Septicemia was not among the top ten leading causes of death among males.

Slide 7

Unintentional injuries (i.e., accidents) accounted for a higher percentage of deaths among males than females. Unintentional injuries accounted for 7.6% of deaths among males and 4.4% of deaths among females.

Heart disease: females: 21.8%, males: 24.2%.

Cancer: females: 20.7%, males: 21.9%.

Unintentional injuries: females: 4.4%, males: 7.6%.

Chronic lower respiratory diseases: males: 5.2%, females: 6.2%.

Stroke: males: 4.3%, females: 6.2%.

Alzheimer’s disease: males: 2.6%, females: 6.1%.

Diabetes: females: 2.7%, males: 3.2%.

Suicide: males: 2.6%. Suicide was not among the top ten leading causes of death for females.

Influenza and pneumonia: males 1.8%, females: 2.1%.

Kidney disease: females: 1.8%. Kidney disease was not among the top ten leading causes of death for males.

Chronic liver disease: males: 1.8%. Chronic liver disease was not among the top ten leading causes of death for females.

Septicemia: females: 1.6%. Septicemia was not among the top ten leading causes of death among males.

Slide 8

In females, unintentional injuries (i.e., accidents) and chronic liver disease (i.e., chronic liver disease and cirrhosis) accounted for a higher percentage of deaths among non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Natives than other race/origin groups. Unintentional injuries accounted for 9.0% of deaths among non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native females compared with 4.9% of Hispanic, 4.4% of non-Hispanic white, 3.7% of non-Hispanic black, and 3.3% of non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander females. Chronic liver disease accounted for 5.6% of deaths among non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native females compared with 2.2% of Hispanic females; chronic liver disease was not among the top ten leading causes of death for non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, or non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander females.

Heart disease: non-Hispanic black females: 22.8%, non-Hispanic white females: 21.9%, non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander females: 20.0%, Hispanic females: 19.6%, non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native females: 16.5%.

Cancer: non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander females: 25.5%, Hispanic females: 22.0%, non-Hispanic black females: 21.5%, non-Hispanic white females: 20.3%, non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native females: 17.6%.

Chronic lower respiratory diseases: non-Hispanic white females: 7.0%, non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native females: 5.7%, non-Hispanic black females: 3.5%, Hispanic females: 3.2%, non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander females: 2.4%.

Stroke: non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander females: 8.4%, non-Hispanic black females: 6.5%, Hispanic females: 6.4%, non-Hispanic white females: 6.0%, non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native females: 4.8%.

Unintentional injuries: non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native females: 9.0%; Hispanic females: 4.9%; non-Hispanic white females: 4.4%; non-Hispanic black females: 3.7%; non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander females: 3.3%.

Alzheimer’s disease: non-Hispanic white females: 6.5%, Hispanic females: 5.7%, non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander females: 5.1%, non-Hispanic black females: 4.0%, non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native females: 2.9%.

Diabetes: non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native females: 5.6%, Hispanic females: 4.7%, non-Hispanic black females: 4.5%, non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander females: 4.1%, non-Hispanic white females: 2.2%.

Chronic liver disease: non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native females: 5.6%; Hispanic females: 2.2%. Chronic liver disease was not among the top ten leading causes of death for non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, or non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander females.

Influenza and pneumonia: non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander females: 3.2%, non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native females: 2.4%, Hispanic females: 2.2%, non-Hispanic white females: 2.1%. Influenza and pneumonia was not among the top ten leading causes of death for non-Hispanic black females.

Kidney disease: non-Hispanic black females: 3.1%, Hispanic females: 2.2%, non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native females: 2.1%, non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander females: 2.1%, non-Hispanic white females: 1.6%.

Septicemia: non-Hispanic black females: 2.2%, non-Hispanic white females: 1.5%. Septicemia was not among the top ten leading causes of death for non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native, non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander, or Hispanic females.

Hypertension: non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander females: 2.3%, non-Hispanic black females: 2.1%. Hypertension was not among the top ten leading causes of death for non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native, or Hispanic females.

Slide 9

In males, unintentional injuries (i.e., accidents) accounted for a higher percentage of deaths among non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Natives and Hispanics than other race/origin groups. Unintentional injuries accounted for 13.8% of deaths among non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native and 11.5% of Hispanic males compared with 7.9% of non-Hispanic black, 7.2% of non-Hispanic white, and 5.6% of non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander males.

Heart disease: non-Hispanic white males: 24.7%, non-Hispanic black males: 23.7%, non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander males: 22.6%, Hispanic males: 20.3%, non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native males: 19.4%.

Cancer: non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander males: 24.8%, non-Hispanic white males: 22.4%, non-Hispanic black males: 20.2%, Hispanic males: 19.4%, non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native males: 16.4%.

Unintentional injuries: non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native males: 13.8%, Hispanic males: 11.5%, non-Hispanic black males: 7.9%, non-Hispanic white males: 7.2%, non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander males: 5.6%.

Stroke: non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander males: 6.6%, non-Hispanic black males: 4.9%, Hispanic males: 4.7%, non-Hispanic white males: 4.1%, non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native males: 3.1%.

Chronic lower respiratory diseases: non-Hispanic white males: 5.9%, non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native males: 4.2%, non-Hispanic black males: 3.2%, non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander males: 3.2%, Hispanic males: 2.5%.

Homicide: non-Hispanic black males: 5.0%, Hispanic males: 2.4%, non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native males: 1.9%. Homicide was not among the top ten leading causes of death for non-Hispanic white or non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander males.

Diabetes: non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native males: 5.9%, Hispanic males: 4.7%, non-Hispanic black males: 4.3%, non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander males: 4.3%, non-Hispanic white males: 2.8%.

Chronic liver disease: non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native males: 5.3%, Hispanic males: 4.0%, non-Hispanic white males: 1.7%. Chronic liver disease was not among the top ten leading causes of death for non-Hispanic black or non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander males.

Alzheimer’s disease: non-Hispanic white males: 2.9%, non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander males: 2.1%, Hispanic males: 2.1%. Alzheimer’s disease was not among the top ten leading causes of death for non-Hispanic black or non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native males.

Suicide: non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native males: 4.3%, Hispanic males: 2.9%, non-Hispanic white males: 2.7%, non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander males: 2.7%. Suicide was not among the top ten leading causes of death for non-Hispanic black males.

Influenza and pneumonia: non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander males: 3.1%, non-Hispanic white males: 1.9%, non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native males: 1.8%. Influenza and pneumonia was not among the top ten leading causes of death for non-Hispanic black or Hispanic males.

Kidney disease: non-Hispanic black males: 2.6%, non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander males: 2.1%. Kidney disease was not among the top ten leading causes of death for non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native males, or Hispanic males.

Septicemia: non-Hispanic black males: 1.7%. Septicemia was not among the top ten leading causes of death for non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native, non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander, or Hispanic males.

Hypertension: non-Hispanic black males: 1.6%. Hypertension was not among the top ten leading causes of death for non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native, non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander, or Hispanic males.

Slide 10

In males, homicide accounted for a higher percentage of deaths among non-Hispanic blacks than other race/origin groups. Homicide accounted for 5.0% of deaths among non-Hispanic black males compared with 2.4% of Hispanic and 1.9% of non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native males; homicide was not among the top ten leading causes of death for non-Hispanic white or non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander males.

Heart disease: non-Hispanic white males: 24.7%, non-Hispanic black males: 23.7%, non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander males: 22.6%, Hispanic males: 20.3%, non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native males: 19.4%.

Cancer: non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander males: 24.8%, non-Hispanic white males: 22.4%, non-Hispanic black males: 20.2%, Hispanic males: 19.4%, non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native males: 16.4%.

Unintentional injuries: non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native males: 13.8%, Hispanic males: 11.5%, non-Hispanic black males: 7.9%, non-Hispanic white males: 7.2%, non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander males: 5.6%.

Stroke: non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander males: 6.6%, non-Hispanic black males: 4.9%, Hispanic males: 4.7%, non-Hispanic white males: 4.1%, non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native males: 3.1%.

Chronic lower respiratory diseases: non-Hispanic white males: 5.9%, non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native males: 4.2%, non-Hispanic black males: 3.2%, non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander males: 3.2%, Hispanic males: 2.5%.

Homicide: non-Hispanic black males: 5.0%, Hispanic males: 2.4%, non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native males: 1.9%. Homicide was not among the top ten leading causes of death for non-Hispanic white or non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander males.

Diabetes: non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native males: 5.9%, Hispanic males: 4.7%, non-Hispanic black males: 4.3%, non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander males: 4.3%, non-Hispanic white males: 2.8%.

Chronic liver disease: non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native males: 5.3%, Hispanic males: 4.0%, non-Hispanic white males: 1.7%. Chronic liver disease was not among the top ten leading causes of death for non-Hispanic black or non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander males.

Alzheimer’s disease: non-Hispanic white males: 2.9%, non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander males: 2.1%, Hispanic males: 2.1%. Alzheimer’s disease was not among the top ten leading causes of death for non-Hispanic black or non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native males.

Suicide: non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native males: 4.3%, Hispanic males: 2.9%, non-Hispanic white males: 2.7%, non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander males: 2.7%. Suicide was not among the top ten leading causes of death for non-Hispanic black males.

Influenza and pneumonia: non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander males: 3.1%, non-Hispanic white males: 1.9%, non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native males: 1.8%. Influenza and pneumonia was not among the top ten leading causes of death for non-Hispanic black or Hispanic males.

Kidney disease: non-Hispanic black males: 2.6%, non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander males: 2.1%. Kidney disease was not among the top ten leading causes of death for non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native males, or Hispanic males.

Septicemia: non-Hispanic black males: 1.7%. Septicemia was not among the top ten leading causes of death for non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native, non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander, or Hispanic males.

Hypertension: non-Hispanic black males: 1.6%. Hypertension was not among the top ten leading causes of death for non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native, non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander, or Hispanic males.

Slide 11

In females, the leading cause of death varied by age group. Among 1-19 year olds, unintentional injuries (i.e., accidents) was the leading cause of death, accounting for 32.7% of deaths. Among 20-44 year olds, unintentional injuries was the leading cause of death, accounting for 30.0% of deaths. Among 45-64 year olds, cancer (i.e., malignant neoplasms) was the leading cause of death, accounting for 34.2% of deaths. Among 65-84 year olds, cancer was the leading cause of death, accounting for 27.0% of deaths. Among those 85 years or older, heart disease was the leading cause of death, accounting for 27.7% of deaths.

1-19 years: unintentional injuries: 32.7%, cancer: 11.0%, suicide: 10.3%, homicide: 7.4%, birth defects: 6.4%, heart disease: 3.4%, influenza and pneumonia: 2.0%, stroke: 1.4%, chronic lower respiratory diseases: 1.2%, benign neoplasms: 1.0%.

20-44 years: unintentional injuries 30.0%, cancer: 16.0%, heart disease: 9.0%, suicide: 7.6%, homicide: 3.8%, chronic liver disease: 2.9%, diabetes: 2.4%, stroke: 2.0%, pregnancy complications: 1.9%, septicemia: 1.2%.

45-64 years: cancer: 34.2%, heart disease: 16.3%, unintentional injuries: 6.9%, chronic lower respiratory diseases: 5.3%, diabetes: 3.8%, stroke: 3.6%, chronic liver disease: 3.5%, suicide: 2.0%, septicemia: 1.8%, kidney disease: 1.6%.

65-84 years: cancer: 27.0%, heart disease: 19.9%, chronic lower respiratory diseases: 8.5%, stroke: 5.8%, Alzheimer’s disease: 4.4%, diabetes: 3.3%, unintentional injuries: 2.3%, kidney disease: 2.1%, influenza and pneumonia: 2.0%, septicemia: 1.8%.

85+ years: heart disease: 27.7%, Alzheimer’s disease: 10.9%, cancer: 9.9%, stroke: 8.1%, chronic lower respiratory diseases: 4.9%, influenza and pneumonia: 2.7%, unintentional injuries: 2.6%, hypertension: 1.9%, diabetes: 1.8%, kidney disease: 1.7%.

Slide 12

In males, the leading cause of death varied by age group. Among 1-19 year olds, unintentional injuries (i.e., accidents) was the leading cause of death, accounting for 33.8% of deaths. Among 20-44 year olds, unintentional injuries was the leading cause of death, accounting for 38.9% of deaths. Among 45-64 year olds, cancer (i.e., malignant neoplasms) was the leading cause of death, accounting for 24.7% of deaths. Among 65-84 year olds, cancer was the leading cause of death, accounting for 27.5% of deaths. Among those 85 years or older, heart disease was the leading cause of death, accounting for 30.1% of deaths.

1-19 years: unintentional injuries: 33.8%, suicide: 17.2%, homicide: 14.7%, cancer: 7.3%, birth defects: 3.9%, heart disease: 2.8%, influenza and pneumonia: 1.1%, chronic lower respiratory diseases: 1.1%, stroke: 1.0%, septicemia: 0.6%.

20-44 years: unintentional injuries: 38.9%, suicide: 13.8%, heart disease: 9.1%, homicide: 9.1%, cancer: 6.4%, chronic liver disease: 2.2%, diabetes: 1.7%, stroke: 1.3%, HIV disease: 0.9%, influenza and pneumonia: 0.7%.

45-64 years: cancer: 24.7%, heart disease: 23.7%, unintentional injuries: 10.1%, chronic liver disease: 4.4%, diabetes: 4.0%, suicide: 3.8%, chronic lower respiratory diseases: 3.4%, stroke: 3.1%, kidney disease: 1.4%, septicemia: 1.4%.

65-84 years: cancer: 27.5%, heart disease: 24.7%, chronic lower respiratory diseases: 6.9%, stroke: 4.6%, diabetes: 3.7%, unintentional injuries: 3.0%, Alzheimer’s disease: 2.4%, kidney disease: 2.0%, influenza and pneumonia: 1.8%, Parkinson’s disease: 1.8%.

85+ years: heart disease: 30.1%, cancer: 14.8%, Alzheimer’s disease: 6.4%, stroke: 6.0%, chronic lower respiratory diseases: 5.6%, unintentional injuries: 3.0%, influenza and pneumonia: 2.9%, kidney disease: 2.3%, Parkinson’s disease: 2.2%, diabetes: 2.2%.

Slide 13

References

  1. Leading Causes of Death in Females, United States webpage: https://www.cdc.gov/women/lcod/index.htm.
  2. Leading Causes of Death in Males, United States webpage: https://www.cdc.gov/healthequity/lcod/index.htm.
  3. Deaths: Leading Causes for 2017: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr68/nvsr68_06-508.pdfpdf icon.

Slide 14 (Closing slide)

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The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Page last reviewed: May 28, 2020