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Feb. 16, 2016: The Challenge of Antibiotic Resistance

CDC Around the World: News, Web, & SOcial Media Updates From the CDC Center for Global Health www.cdc.gov/global

Feb. 16, 2016

Photo of the week
PHOTO OF THE WEEK

The rise of antibiotic resistance is one of the greatest challenges for global health. 

Spotlighted Topic of the Week: Antibiotic Resistance

Blog of the Week

THE CHALLENGE OF GLOBAL ANTIBIOTIC POLICY: IMPROVING ACCESS AND PREVENTING EXCESS

Antibiotic resistance has been making headlines lately, and for good reason: the identification of new resistance genes, rising resistance rates and widespread public misunderstanding of the problem are all causes for concern about the growing proliferation of drug-resistant “superbugs.” But in many low- and middle-income countries, millions of people lack access to antibiotics and common infections like pneumonia pose a far greater threat than any superbug…read more.

The challenge of global antibiotic policy: Improving access and preventing excess

Infographic of the Week

CAUSES OF ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE
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Causes of Antibiotic Resistance

Video of the Week

RAMANAN LAXMINARAYAN: THE COMING CRISIS IN ANTIBIOTICS

Antibiotic drugs save lives. But we simply use them too much — and often for non-lifesaving purposes, like treating the flu and even raising cheaper chickens. The result, says researcher Ramanan Laxminarayan, is that the drugs will stop working for everyone, as the bacteria they target grow more and more resistant. He calls on all of us (patients and doctors alike) to think of antibiotics — and their ongoing effectiveness — as a finite resource, and to think twice before we tap into it. It’s a sobering look at how global medical trends can strike home…Watch video

Ramanan Laxminarayan: The coming crisis in antibiotics

Story of the Week

PROTECTING THE POWER ANTIBIOTICS: LESSONS FROM EGYPT

Consider this: Alexander Fleming discovered the first antibiotic – penicillin – in 1928, at a time when the world’s population was less than 1/3 of what it is today and commercial air travel was not yet commonplace. In our century, dangerous bacteria can very quickly spread from person to person across the globe. When these bacteria stop being susceptible to the drugs we use against them, common infections can turn into deadly threats…Read story

Protecting the Power of Antibiotics: Lessons from Egypt

CDC Zika Updates

Latest Outbreak Info

On January 22, 2016, CDC activated its Emergency Operations Center (EOC) to respond to outbreaks of Zika occurring in the Americas and increased reports of birth defects and Guillain-Barré syndrome in areas affected by Zika. On February 1, 2016, the World Health Organization declared a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC) because of clusters of microcephaly and other neurological disorders in some areas affected by Zika. On February 8, 2016, CDC elevated its EOC activation to a Level 1, the highest level.

CDC is working with international public health partners and with state and local health departments to

  • Alert healthcare providers and the public about Zika.
  • Post travel notices and other travel-related guidance.
  • Provide state health laboratories with diagnostic tests.
  • Detect and report cases, which will help prevent further spread.

Q & A on Zika

Areas with Zika

In the News

On the Calendar

February 20: World Day of Social Justice
February 29: Rare Disease Day
February 29- March 6: World Salt Awareness Week
March 3: World Birth Defects Day
March 8: International Women's Day
March 24:
 World TB Day

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  • Page last reviewed: February 16, 2016
  • Page last updated: February 16, 2016
  • Content source:

    Global Health
    Notice: Linking to a non-federal site does not constitute an endorsement by HHS, CDC or any of its employees of the sponsors or the information and products presented on the site.

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