Measles & Rubella Move Fast Infographic

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Measles and rubella move fast. Failure to vaccinate children against measles and rubella puts them at risk of serious health complications, such as: pneumonia, diarrhea, brain damage, deafness, blindness and heart disorders.

Infographic Description

MEASLES AND RUBELLA MOVE FAST

Failure to vaccinate children against measles & rubella puts them at risk of severe health complications, such as

  • 100,000 babies are born with CRS each year globally.
  • A pregnant woman unvaccinated against rubella who is infected during her first trimester has up to a 90% chance of giving birth to a baby with congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) –that is if the baby survives.

Vaccination prevents mothers from giving birth to babies with CRS and prevents life-long disability.

In 2017, over 300 people  died per day due to measles with 6.7 million estimated cases globally.

  • Measles cases have increased significantly from 2017 to 2018 with outbreaks occurring in previously measles-free countries too.
  • Measles is one of the most contagious diseases but it’s entirely preventable with a vaccine

Countries with the highest number of measles cases:

  • Nigeria
  • DR Congo
  • Somalia
  • Pakistan
  • India
  • Indonesia

*A family can lose a month’s income caring for a child who is sick with measles.

Measles is one of the leading causes of death among children around the world.

  • More than 300 children die every day from measles
  • 10 every hour

Even though  a safe and effective vaccine has been available for over 50 years.

MEASLES AND RUBELLA MOVE FAST

WE HAVE COMMITTED TO MOVING FASTER

Eliminating measles & rubella requires reaching every child to protect them against both diseases.

  • It costs less than $2.00 to vaccinate a child against both measles and rubella in low-income countries
  • More than 2.9 billion vaccinated since 2001
  • Measles vaccination prevented 21.1+ million child deaths from 2000-2017
Page last reviewed: April 30, 2019
Content source: Global Health