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Global Disease Detection Program: China

In response to the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, two locally employed staff from the U.S. CDC Office in China stepped forward to assist U.S. CDC Atlanta in transferring a new diagnostic test for Ebola to a Chinese-donated research laboratory in Sierra Leone. Photo Credit: Yin Wenjiao

In response to the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, two locally employed staff from the U.S. CDC Office in China stepped forward to assist U.S. CDC Atlanta in transferring a new diagnostic test for Ebola to a Chinese-donated research laboratory in Sierra Leone. Photo Credit: Yin Wenjiao

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has collaborated with public health institutions in China since the 1980s to address public health priorities that affect China, the United States, and the global community. In 2005, China and the U.S. established the China-U.S. Collaborative Program on Emerging and Re-emerging Infectious Diseases (EID), which acts as one of ten international Global Disease Detection (GDD) Centers.

The GDD Center in China provides technical assistance and partners with China CDC to identify and contain emerging infectious disease and other threats. Among other efforts, the Center has provided technical assistance in evaluating China’s surveillance systems, worked to improve the response and control of zoonotic diseases, helped establish a national norovirus outbreak surveillance network, and collaborated on responses to influenza.

The GDD Center in China helps contain outbreaks close to the source by building up local resources, drawing on combined expertise in:

  • Emerging infectious disease detection and response
  • Field epidemiology and laboratory training
  • Pandemic influenza preparedness and response
  • Zoonotic disease research and control

Through partnerships with the China National Health and Family Planning Commission (NHFPC), the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China CDC), and the World Health Organization (WHO), the U.S. CDC is helping to increase the country’s capacity to detect and control infectious diseases.

Making an Impact

A local staff worker conducts a baseline survey for the Echinococcosis health communication strategy project in Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, Sichuan Province. Photo Credit: Li Richun
A local staff worker conducts a baseline survey for the Echinococcosis health communication strategy project in Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, Sichuan Province. Photo Credit: Li Richun

From 2006-2016, the Center in China has supported

  • Effective response to over 581 outbreaks
  • Implementation of population-based pneumonia surveillance in Jinzhou, Hubei Province, covering one million lives
  • Detection of three novel strains and pathogens new to the region or world
  • Establishment of in-country diagnostic testing capacity for 17 diseases or pathogens
  • Graduation of 288 public health professionals through China’s Field Epidemiology Training Program
  • Training of over 18,366 public health professionals through short-term exercises, including pandemic preparedness, rapid response, and epidemiology and laboratory training
  • Improved health communication through training of nearly 5,188 provincial communicators on use of risk communication principles, news media channels, and emergency communication strategies
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