Developing Surveillance and Health Information Systems

CDC Kenya supports the development and implementation of population and facility-based disease surveillance systems that provide for data collection, analysis, and reporting in order to assess the disease burden in communities, identify outbreaks, and evaluate the impact of health interventions. CDC Kenya has also spearheaded state-of-the-art and mobile data collection systems.

Laboratory WorkerA core strength for CDC Kenya is its ability to develop, strengthen, and evaluate surveillance and strategic information systems (e.g. vital registration systems) and to analyze data collected by these systems. CDC Kenya is committed to help the MOH and other partners build capacity to collect the health information needed to make evidence-based decisions for appropriate use of limited resources, respond to public health problems, and assess the impact of interventions.

CDC Kenya supports the development and implementation of population and facility-based disease surveillance systems that provide for data collection, analysis, and reporting in order to assess the disease burden in communities, identify outbreaks, and evaluate the impact of health interventions. CDC Kenya has also spearheaded state-of-the-art and mobile data collection systems.

One of the most significant examples of CDC’s work to build sustainable public health infrastructure, strengthen health systems, and use data to affect policy has been the support to the government of Kenya in implementing national level surveys. The Kenya AIDS Indicator Survey (KAIS) – the most comprehensive Kenyan national surveillance effort to date – represents a significant milestone for Kenya in strategically targeting HIV resources and programs for maximum disease impact. As a result of 2007 and 2012 KAIS findings, the government of Kenya changed strategies and policies that increased accessibility to HIV testing and better targeted prevention services resulting in fewer new cases of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections.

Page last reviewed: November 2, 2017
Content source: Global Health