Annual Reports on Foodborne Illness Source Attribution Estimates

Foodborne Illness Source Attribution Estimates for Salmonella, Escherichia coli O157, Listeria monocytogenes, and Campylobacter Using Multi-Year Outbreak Surveillance Data, United States

Suggested citation:

Interagency Food Safety Analytics Collaboration. Foodborne illness source attribution estimates for {Year} for Salmonella, Escherichia coli O157, Listeria monocytogenes, and Campylobacter using multi-year outbreak surveillance data, United States. Atlanta, Georgia and Washington, District of Columbia: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, CDC, FDA, USDA/FSIS. {Publication Year, example: 2018.}

About the Reports

These reports use outbreak data to produce annual estimates for foods responsible for foodborne illnesses caused by four pathogens. CDC estimates that, together, these four pathogens cause 1.9 million foodborne illnesses in the United States each year. The analysis uses a method developed by IFSAC Cdc-pdf[PDF – 12 pages] to estimate foodborne illness source attribution, which is the process of estimating the degree to which specific foods and food categories are responsible for foodborne illnesses.

Latest Report for 2016

IFSAC analyzed data from just over 1,000 foodborne disease outbreaks that occurred from 1998 through 2016 to assess which categories of foods were most responsible for Salmonella, E. coli O157, Listeria monocytogenes, and Campylobacter infections. These pathogens were chosen because of the frequency or severity of the illnesses they cause, and because targeted interventions can have a major impact in reducing them. The implicated foods were divided into 17 categories for the analysis, and the method gives the greatest weight to the most recent five years of outbreak data (2012–2016).

Read the latest report for 2016 Cdc-pdf[PDF – 14 pages]

Previous Reports

Read the 2015 report Cdc-pdf[PDF – 14 pages]

Read the 2014 report Cdc-pdf[PDF – 14 pages]

Read the 2013 report Cdc-pdf[PDF – 14 pages]