2019 Preliminary Data: Tables and Figure

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Documenting the major sources of and trends in foodborne illness provides important information needed to determine whether prevention measures are working. Each year, FoodNet reports on the number of infections in the FoodNet surveillance area from pathogens transmitted commonly through food. Laboratory tests, including cultures and culture-independent diagnostic tests (CIDTs), detected these pathogens.

This year’s report summarizes 2019 preliminary surveillance data and describes 2019 incidence compared with 2016–2018 for infections caused by Campylobacter, Cyclospora, Listeria, Salmonella, Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC), Shigella, Vibrio, and Yersinia. The report also summarizes cases of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) for 2018.

Incidence trends

FoodNet uses a main-effects, log-linear Poisson regression (negative binomial) model to estimate changes in the incidence of infection. The model adjusts for the increase in the number of FoodNet sites since 1996 and for variation in the incidence of infections among sites. The average annual incidence for 2016–2018 is used for comparisons. The model is used to calculate the estimated change in incidence (relative rate) between 2019 and the comparison periods, with 95% confidence intervals (CIs).

Table 1. Percentage change in incidence of the top 6 Salmonella serotypes in 2019* compared with 2016–2018 average annual incidence, by serotype, FoodNet
Table 1. Percentage change in incidence of the top 14 Salmonella serotypes in 2018* compared with 2015–2017 average annual incidence, by serotype, FoodNet
Serotype % Change in Incidence Rate (95% CI)
Enteritidis -4% (-17% to +11%)
Newport -12% (-27% to +7%)
Typhimurium -13% (-24% to -1%)
Javiana -7% (-26% to +17%)
I 4,[5],12:i:- -28% (-44% to -8%)
Infantis +69% (+31% to +118%)

*Data for 2019 are preliminary.
Percentage change reported as increase (+) or decrease (-). Significant changes indicated in bold.

Table 2. Percentage change in incidence of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli infections in 2019* compared with 2016–2018 average annual incidence, by serogroup, FoodNet, 2016–2019
Table 2. Percentage change in incidence of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli infections in 2018* compared with 2015–2017 average annual incidence, by serogroup, FoodNet, 2015–2018
Serotype % Change in Incidence Rate (95% CI)
O157 -20% (-34% to -3%)
non-O157 +35% (+18% to +56%)

*Data for 2019 are preliminary.
Percentage change reported as increase (+) or decrease (-). Significant changes indicated in bold.

Table 3. Percentage change in incidence of hemloytic uremic syndrome (HUS) cases in 2018* compared with 2015–2017 average annual incidence, by serogroup, FoodNet
Table 3. Percentage change in incidence of hemloytic uremic syndrome (HUS) cases in 2017* compared with 2014–2016 average annual incidence, by serogroup, FoodNet
Population % Change in Incidence Rate (95% CI)
<18 years of age -6% (-30% to +27%)
<5 years of age -21% (-47% to +20%)

*Data for 2018 are preliminary.

Figure 1. Number of Cyclospora infections diagnosed by diagnostic test type, by year— FoodNet sites*, 2016–2019

Figure 1. Number of Cyclospora infections diagnosed by diagnostic test type, by year— FoodNet sites, 2016–2019

Download Figure 1 raw data excel icon[XLS – 14 KB]


*Data for 2019 are preliminary.