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FASD Awareness

BabyAlcohol use during pregnancy can cause fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, which are physical, behavioral, and intellectual disabilities that last a lifetime. Often, a person with an FASD has a mix of these problems. It is recommended that women who are pregnant or might be pregnant not drink alcohol. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders are completely preventable if a developing baby is not exposed to alcohol before birth.

What We Know

  • Women who are pregnant or who might be pregnant should be aware that any level of alcohol use could harm their babies.
  • All types of alcohol can be harmful, including all wine and beer.
  • The baby’s brain, body, and organs are developing throughout pregnancy and can be affected by alcohol at any time.
  • Alcohol use during pregnancy can also increase the risk of miscarriage, stillbirth, preterm (early) birth, and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).

Infographic: Alcohol use during pregnancy can lead to lifelong effects.

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Free Resources to Help Healthcare Practices Implement Alcohol Screening and Counseling 
CDC has a free guide to help staff in any primary care practice to plan and implement alcohol screening and counseling. Learn more >>

What Can Be Done to Prevent Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

Women Can

  • Talk with their healthcare providers about their plans for pregnancy, their alcohol use, and ways to prevent pregnancy if they are not planning to get pregnant.
  • Stop drinking alcohol if they are trying to get pregnant or could get pregnant.
  • Ask their respective partners, families, and friends to support their choice not to drink during pregnancy or while trying to get pregnant.
  • Ask their healthcare providers or other trusted people about resources for help if they cannot stop drinking on their own.

Healthcare providers can

  • Screen all adult patients for alcohol use at least yearly.
  • Advise women not to drink at all if there is any chance they could be pregnant.
  • Counsel, refer, and follow up with patients who need more help.
  • Use the correct billing codes so that alcohol screening and counseling is reimbursable.
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