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Celebrate National DNA Day on April 25th!

Collage of DNA images and people

Join the National DNA Day “15 for 15” Celebration and learn 15 ways that genomics is influencing our world. Visit the website daily through April 25 to discover the topic of the day and explore resources for teachers, students, and anyone else who wants to improve their understanding of DNA, genetics, and genomics. The website also has information for experts in genetics and genomics who are interested in outreach to schools and their community.

This year marks the 65th anniversary of the discovery of the DNA double helix and the 15th anniversary of the completion of the International Human Genome Project when scientists first sequenced the DNA of the entire human genome. The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) launched the “15 for 15″ Celebration to commemorate these milestones.

Spread the word about DNA Day! Sign up to support the #DNADay18 Thunderclap before April 25 (12 pm EDT).

15 for 15 Celebration infographic

The 15 for 15 Celebration highlights different ways genomics is influencing our world. View large image and text description.

You can be part of the “15 for 15” Celebration by

  • Visiting the National DNA Day website to find helpful classroom resources for teachers and outreach ideas for scientists, including modules for classroom outreach, lesson plans, and educational videos on scientific topics and experiments. Teachers: check out the contests where your students can show off what they’ve learned!
  • Participating in the Reddit Science “Ask Me Anything” (AMA) question and answer series, which started April 20 and runs through Friday, April 27 (1:00 – 3:00 pm EDT). The series began with NIH Director Dr. Francis Collins, who led the International Human Genome Project, talking about the future of genomics. Other topics include personal genetics, The Human Cell Atlas, and microbes.
  • Joining the DNA Day Facebook April 25 (4:00 pm EDT) live-streamed presentation with DNAsimple CEO Dr. Olivier Noel (as seen on ABC’s Shark Tank) for a lively discussion about entrepreneurship and science startups.
  • Following @DNAday on Twitter to get the latest news about National DNA Day.
  • Reading selections from the American Society of Human Genetics’ DNA Day essay contest winners. This year, high school contestants discussed direct-to-consumer genetic testing and whether medical professionals should be required for all genetic testing.
  • Sharing your DNA Day activities on social media using the hashtags #DNADay18 and #15for15.
  • Attending the DNA Day Human Origins Today (HOT) Topic presentation, “Your Microbiome is a Part of this Microbial Planet” by Dr. Lita Proctor on April 27 (4:00 – 5:00 pm EDT) at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in the One Species, Living Worldwide Theater in Washington DC.

You can also find events in your area. Use the starter kit if you’d like to plan an event yourself and be sure to register your event. If you’re a teacher interested in having a genetics expert come to your classroom or a scientist interested in sharing your knowledge of genetics with schools in your community, check out the Genetics Education Outreach (GEON) program.

  • Page last reviewed: April 24, 2018
  • Page last updated: April 24, 2018
  • Content source:
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