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Trends in HPV Vaccine Types in Cervical Precancers in Five States - United States, 2008-2014

  • We evaluated HPV vaccine impact by describing trends in the proportion of cervical precancers due to HPV vaccine types 16 and 18 among 18-39 year-old women from 2008-2014.
  • Overall, women aged 18-39 years old had a decrease in the proportion of cervical precancers due to HPV vaccine types 16 and 18 from 54% in 2008 to 45% in 2014.
  • From 2008-2014, women 18-39 years-old who got the HPV vaccine had a 23% decrease in the proportion of cervical precancers due to HPV types 16 and 18. Unvaccinated women did not have a decrease.
  • From 2008-2014, both black and white women had a decrease in the proportion of cervical precancers due to HPV types 16 and 18, but not Hispanic or Asian women. A smaller percentage of Hispanic and Asian women with precancers were vaccinated, which may explain this finding.

Quote from the Disease Detective

“All HPV vaccines target HPV types 16 and 18, which cause about 70% of cervical cancers. This study shows that the proportion of cervical precancers caused by HPV types 16 and 18 decreased between 2008 and 2014 and provides further evidence of impact of HPV vaccination in the United States. This means that we expect to see fewer women being diagnosed with and dying from cervical cancer in the future because of HPV vaccination.”

– Nancy McCabe McClung, PhD (Nursing), EIS Class of 2017

View abstract

Nancy McClung, PhD, EIS Class of 2017 (right), and colleagues reviewing slides of cervical biopsy specimens before they are sent to the CDC for HPV DNA typing.

Nancy McClung, PhD, EIS Class of 2017 (right), and colleagues reviewing slides of cervical biopsy specimens before they are sent to the CDC for HPV DNA typing.

Contact Information

CDC Media Relations
(404) 639-3286
media@cdc.gov

Conference Information

Spokesperson

Nancy McClung

 

Nancy McCabe McClung, PhD (Nursing), EIS Class of 2017
CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases
Division of Viral Diseases
Viral Vaccine Preventable Diseases Branch

Education: PhD (Nursing): Emory Univ., 2015; BSN: Duke University, 2007; BA: Wheaton College, 2006

Work Experience: Staff Nurse, Emory Healthcare, 2011-2015; Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, Staff Nurse, 2008-2011

Volunteer Experience: Lazarus Ministries, Medical Coordinator, 2009-2014

 

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