Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

Anthrax Epizootic in Hippopotami and Cape Buffalo and Associated Human Exposures – Namibia, 2017

  • From September to December of 2017, more than 200 hippos and Cape buffalo died from anthrax in Namibia, raising concern that people and livestock living nearby could be at risk of becoming infected.
  • Even though more than 800 people were exposed to anthrax, there have been no human or livestock cases or deaths associated with anthrax. This success was largely due to the quick dissemination of antibiotics to people who had been exposed, guidance about avoiding contact with contaminated animals, and a coordinated campaign to vaccinate over 10,000 livestock in the affected area.
  • This was the first successful use of a rapid diagnostic test for anthrax in wildlife in the field. This supports this test having strong potential for future use in other low-resource, anthrax endemic settings to quickly assess whether animals have died from anthrax.

Quote from the Disease Detective

“We worked closely with human health, animal health, and environmental health partners related to management of the outbreak. Anthrax could have spread from the infected hippos and Cape buffalo and caused illnesses and deaths in people and domestic animals, living nearby however, despite the many wildlife deaths, there were no human or livestock cases associated with this outbreak. This has highlighted how rapid public health response and proactive measures like antibiotics for exposed people, communicating with the public, and vaccinating livestock can stop a potential outbreak in its tracks,”

-Caitlin Cossaboom, PhD, DVM, MPH, EIS Class of 2017

View abstract

Contact Information

CDC Media Relations
(404) 639-3286
media@cdc.gov

Conference Information

Spokesperson

Caitlin Cossaboom, PhD, DVM, MPH, EIS Class of 2017

 

Caitlin Cossaboom, PhD, DVM, MPH, EIS Class of 2017
CDC’s National Center for Emerging Zoonotic Infectious Diseases
Division of High-Consequence Pathogens and Pathology

Education: DVM: Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Present; PhD: Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 2015; MPH: Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 2014; BS: Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 2010; BS: Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 2010

Work Experience: Graduate Research Assistant, Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine, Blacksburg, VA, 2010-2015

TOP