Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

Measure and Evaluate Results

measuring tape around apple

Data collection should be a regular component of your worksite wellness program. Data will help you evaluate the program and know whether you have met your goals. Evaluation also gives you the information needed to modify the program as employee needs change.

Evaluation does not have to be complicated. You can follow the same data collection methods you used for planning the program: employee health risk assessments, health risk surveys, and analyzing pharmacy and medical claims data.

However, you also will want to measure:

Participation –  How many people attended activities, when, and where?

Satisfaction –  Were employees positive about the programming and did they believe they benefited?

Efficiency –  Did the program operate within specified budget and timelines?

Knowledge –  What did participants learn about diabetes prevention and management?

Outcomes –  Have participants actually changed their behavior and are health indicators improving?

  • Participation:  The easiest to measure. If employees do not like the offered programs, they will stop participating. Winning them back can be difficult.
  • Satisfaction: Another easily measured variable. Take criticism seriously, but not personally. People love to complain. If a company listens carefully, employees will give feedback on program design successes and failures.
  • Behavior changes:  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention determined approximately 75% of health care costs and productivity losses are related to lifestyle choices.  Changing behavior is critical to reducing health care costs.
  • Biometrics:  Blood pressure, body weight and cholesterol are great evaluation targets and easy to track over time if employees remain engaged and data is collected annually.
  • Productivity:  Employees lifestyles affect how productive they are. Lifestyles also impacts the level of service a company provides its customers. Absenteeism measures can be valuable factors for determining the impact and ROI of a wellness program, in addition to measuring health care expenditures.
  • Medical claims:  At least 25 to 40 percent of all health plan claims are avoidable through prevention, early detection and the reduction of modifiable health risk factors. Some studies indicate this number may be as high as 50 – 70 percent.  By analyzing an organization’s potentially modifiable health care costs, a wellness provider can significantly advance organizational goals.

Aids & Tools

Know More

  1. Find tools for measurement and evaluation from the following organizations:

Ask More

  1. I have done an evaluation of our diabetes program but diabetes is only one of the diseases that affect our workforce. How can the lessons learned from the diabetes program help us with other worksite wellness programs?
    Answer:
    Participation in health promotion activities through a workplace health program allows individuals to develop knowledge, self-management and coping skills as well as build a social support network among coworkers, supervisors, and family.  These skills can facilitate adopting healthy behaviors in the short-term and lead to changes in physical, mental, and/or emotional health in the long-term. 
    Overall satisfaction is an indicator that crosses all programs.
    In addition, measures that assess behavior change that can be risk factors for multiple diseases could be considered umbrella indicators so things like weight management, exercise, and stress reduction could all be affected by a single program but could have impact across disease states.  
    Find out more about these health outcomes.
  2. I have no money for evaluation – what can I do without any money?
    Answer:
    Several key elements of a program evaluation can be collected through surveys. For example, surveying employees to understand their satisfaction with a program is a key indicator for program success. 
  3. Are there examples of the type of return on Investment that other worksite wellness programs have achieved?
    Answer:
    Check out the resources in the Success Story section of the Diabetes at Work website.  There are also several articles about cost savings and increased productivity in the Resources section of this website. 
  4. Diabetes is only one of the diseases that affect our workforce. How can I link the outcomes for the diabetes efforts with the efforts related to other related chronic diseases?
    Answer:
    Overall satisfaction is an indicator that crosses all programs. In addition, measures that assess behavior change that can be risk factors for multiple diseases could be considered umbrella indicators so things like weight management, exercise, and stress reduction could all be affected by a single program but could have impact across disease states. 
  5. We are just starting our wellness program. How can I establish a baseline?
    Answer:
    Collect data prior to the program kick off. See the Plan sections related to data collection for more information to establish your baselines.

Do More

  1. Watch the webinars developed by the National Healthy Worksite Program that focus on the fundamentals of implementing a healthy worksite program including  measurement and evaluation, such as:
    • Making the case for a healthy worksite and the importance of leadership support
    • Data collection methods and tools
    • Creating and implementing a comprehensive healthy worksite plan
    • Do a Swift Worksite Assessment and Translation (SWAT) evaluation, a method developed by CDC to determine a useful and business-friendly approach to conducting a systematic, yet rapid, evaluation process.

TOP