DHIS Newsroom and Resource Center

DHIS Newsroom and Resource Center
NNDSS Publishes Finalized Annual Infectious Disease Data
NNDSS

CDC is pleased to announce that finalized 2018 National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS) annual infectious disease data are now available as tables on the data and statistics section of the NNDSS webpage. In addition to links to the tables, hosted by the CDC Wide-ranging Online Data for Epidemiological Research (WONDER), the website provides detailed information about notifiable disease surveillance and the data themselves.

Annual infectious disease data are helpful to public health officials, policy makers, and researchers because they show the occurrence and population distribution of conditions of public health concern across the country. Year-to-year comparisons provide insights into historic trends and emerging patterns.

Highlights of the tables include the following:

  • Table 1 displays annual reported infectious notifiable disease case counts and incidence rates for the United States overall, excluding U.S. Territories.
  • Tables 2a–2q display annual reported infectious notifiable disease cases for the United States overall, by state, by region, and for five U.S. Territories (American Samoa, Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, Puerto Rico, and U.S. Virgin Islands).
  • Table 3 displays reported infectious notifiable disease cases by month for the United States overall, excluding U.S. Territories.
  • Tables 4–7 display reported infectious notifiable disease case counts and rates by age group, sex, race, and ethnicity, respectively, for the United States overall, excluding U.S. Territories.

The list of nationally notifiable diseases for 2018 is available on the NNDSS website along with the respective national surveillance case definitions. Surveillance case definitions are a set of uniform criteria to define a disease or condition for public health surveillance. They enable public health to classify and count cases consistently across reporting jurisdictions.

Note 6 at the bottom of the 2018 NNDSS tables describes the population used in the incidence rate calculations, how the incidence rates were computed, and any age restrictions used in calculation of the rates.

About NNDSS
To protect Americans from serious disease, NNDSS helps public health monitor, control, and prevent about 120 diseases. These diseases are important to monitor nationwide and include infectious diseases such as Zika virus disease and Zika virus infection, viral hepatitis, sexually transmitted diseases, and E. coli. About 3,000 public health jurisdictions gather data on these diseases from sources such as healthcare providers, hospitals, and laboratories and use the data to protect their local communities. Through NNDSS, CDC receives and uses these data to keep people healthy and defend America from health threats.

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DHIS Announces Release of NBS 6.1
National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System Base System (NBS)

The CDC Division of Health Informatics and Surveillance (DHIS) is pleased to announce the release of NBS 6.1, the newest version of the National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NEDSS) Base System (NBS). NBS is an integrated information system that helps local, state, and territorial public health departments manage reportable disease data and send notifiable disease data to CDC.

The NBS team implemented the following new enhancements to respond to users’ needs:

  • Migrated Treatment Module to Page Builder technology and incorporated the following additional enhancements into the module:
    • ability to filter treatments by condition
    • ability to submit and add another treatment.
  • Updated the NBS standard operating environment to use JDK v 212 and moved to Adopt Open JDK.
  • Included ability to batch HL7 case notifications by using Rhapsody.
  • Included ability to republish Page Builder Investigation Pages in bulk.
  • Incorporated several defect fixes and other small enhancements requested by users of the system.

How to Access NBS 6.1
Current users of the system can find the NBS Install Package on NBS Central at:
https://nbscentral.sramanaged.com//redmine/login.external icon

Others can access a demo of the system at:
http://nbsbeta.sramanaged.com/nbs/loginexternal icon
User ID: demouser
No password is required

About the NEDSS Base System
NBS provides a tool to support the public health investigation workflow and to process, analyze, and share disease-related health information. NBS also provides reporting jurisdictions with a NEDSS-compatible information system to transfer epidemiologic, laboratory, and clinical data efficiently and securely over the Internet. Built and maintained by CDC, NBS integrates data from many sources on multiple public health conditions to help local, state, and territorial public health officials identify and track cases of disease over time. This capability allows public health to provide appropriate interventions to help limit the severity and spread of disease.

Additional information about NBS can be found on the NBS website at https://www.cdc.gov/nbs/.

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NNDSS Announces New Message Mapping Guide for Tuberculosis and Latent TB Infection HL7 Case Notifications
National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System

The CDC National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS), in collaboration with the CDC Division of Tuberculosis Elimination, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, is pleased to announce a finalized HL7 message mapping guide (MMG) is now available for tuberculosis (TB) and latent TB infection. Public health jurisdictions can prepare to send their disease notifications by using this MMG, which is posted on the NNDSS HL7 Case Notification Resource Center.

CDC developed this MMG to support public health’s response needs as part of the NNDSS Modernization Initiative (NMI). The NMI Technical Assistance and Onboarding teams are ready to assist jurisdictions in implementing the new messages and in obtaining approval to begin transmitting them.  Please contact edx@cdc.gov to request technical assistance or to begin the onboarding process.

About NNDSS
To protect Americans from serious disease, NNDSS helps public health monitor, control, and prevent about 120 diseases. These diseases are important to monitor nationwide and include infectious diseases such as Zika virus infection, foodborne outbreaks such as E. coli, and noninfectious conditions such as lead poisoning. About 3,000 public health jurisdictions gather and use data on these diseases to protect their local communities. Through NNDSS, CDC receives and uses these data to keep people healthy and defend America from health threats.

About the NNDSS Modernization Initiative
NNDSS relies on the monitoring and disease control activities performed by local and state public health jurisdictions across the country. The NNDSS Modernization Initiative is making it faster and easier for public health jurisdictions to send data to CDC, and CDC is improving how we deliver these data to our disease programs.

As part of the NMI effort and through collaboration and commitment from subject matter experts across multiple CDC national centers and involvement of jurisdiction partners and other key stakeholders, CDC is developing and adopting new-generation MMGs for HL7 case notifications. With these guides, CDC will migrate from legacy messaging structures to the widely adopted HL7 standards that provide content standardization and interoperable message exchange structures. In addition to providing core data elements and data exchange formats, these new MMGs will satisfy CDC program requests for disease-specific variables for notifiable conditions.

For more information about NMI, please access the NMI website.

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NNDSS Announces New Message Mapping Guides for Trichinellosis and Babesiosis HL7 Case Notifications
National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System

CDC National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS), in collaboration with the CDC Division of Parasitic Diseases, Center for Global Health, is pleased to announce that finalized HL7 message mapping guides (MMGs) are now available for trichinellosis and babesiosis. Public health jurisdictions can prepare to send their disease notifications by using these MMGs, which are posted on the NNDSS HL7 Case Notification Resource Center.

CDC developed these MMGs to support public health’s response needs as part of the NNDSS Modernization Initiative (NMI). The NMI Technical Assistance and Onboarding teams are ready to assist jurisdictions in implementing the new messages and in obtaining approval to begin transmitting them.  Please contact edx@cdc.gov to request technical assistance or to begin the onboarding process.

About NNDSS
To protect Americans from serious disease, NNDSS helps public health monitor, control, and prevent about 120 diseases. These diseases are important to monitor nationwide and include infectious diseases such as Zika virus infection, foodborne outbreaks such as E. coli, and noninfectious conditions such as lead poisoning. About 3,000 public health jurisdictions gather and use data on these diseases to protect their local communities. Through NNDSS, CDC receives and uses these data to keep people healthy and defend America from health threats.

About the NNDSS Modernization Initiative
NNDSS relies on the monitoring and disease control activities performed by local and state public health jurisdictions across the country. The NNDSS Modernization Initiative is making it faster and easier for public health jurisdictions to send data to CDC, and CDC is improving how we deliver these data to our disease programs.

As part of the NMI effort and through collaboration and commitment from subject matter experts across multiple CDC national centers and involvement of jurisdiction partners and other key stakeholders, CDC is developing and adopting new-generation MMGs for HL7 case notifications. With these guides, CDC will migrate from legacy messaging structures to the widely adopted HL7 standards that provide content standardization and interoperable message exchange structures. In addition to providing core data elements and data exchange formats, these new MMGs will satisfy CDC program requests for disease-specific variables for notifiable conditions.

For more information about NMI, please access the NMI website.

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DHIS to Present Surveillance-related Sessions at 2019 CSTE Annual Conference
NNDSS, NSSP, and Epi Info

The CDC Division of Health Informatics and Surveillance (DHIS) is excited to announce several surveillance-related sessions at the 2019 Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) Annual Conference, including sessions on the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS), Epi Info, NEDSS Base System (NBS), and syndromic surveillance. This year’s conference is in Raleigh, North Carolina, on June 2–6.

On Sunday, June 2, 8:00 am–5:00 pm, the NNDSS and NSSP teams will participate in a workshop, “Surveillance/Informatics—Surveillance: Getting from Data to Action,” that will provide learning opportunities and small group dialogue around policies and practices that support effective collection and use of public health surveillance data, particularly as it relates to effective data visualization to motivate action. The goals of this workshop are the following:

  • Provide information about the framework, priorities, and implementation of the CDC Public Health Data strategy.
  • Provide a forum for discussing new surveillance opportunities among CSTE members, CDC staff, other public health partners, and key stakeholders.
  • Facilitate peer-to-peer learning and discussion across organizational and disciplinary boundaries.
  • Identify current and evolving workforce needs to enhance public health’s ability to access relevant data and use it meaningfully.

Also, on Sunday, June 2, 9:00 am–5:00 pm, the Epi Info™ team will present a full-day workshop on “Epi Info,” a public domain suite of software tools designed for the public health community and used for outbreak investigations; for development of small to mid-sized disease surveillance systems; as analysis, visualization, and reporting components of larger systems; and in the continuing education in the science of epidemiology and public health analytic methods at schools of public health around the world. The workshop has two parts:

  • Part I will provide an overview of Epi Info suite of products. The session will discuss the data collection need during a public health event and how various kind of data collection scenarios are handled through Epi Info™ products.  Participants will learn how to quickly design data collection forms using the Epi Info™ Form Designer and explore various solutions for data collection (Web and Cloud solutions https://www.cdc.gov/epiinfo/cloud.html and Epi Info™ for Mobile (https://www.cdc.gov/epiinfo/mobile.html). Hands-on exercises will be completed during the session.
  • Part II of the workshop will highlight importing data into a central database repository from data collected through the suite of product offerings (Desktop, Web & Cloud, and Mobile). Participants will learn how to set up dashboards to analyze data using the Visual Dashboard, explore the various statistical analyses that can be performed using Epi Info™, and learn the limitations and appropriateness of each for a given data set.

On Monday, June 3, the NNDSS team will participate in three exciting sessions:

  • 10:30 am–12:00 pm: “NNDSS Modernization Initiative: Final Boarding Call,” Lesliann Helmus, DHIS associate director for surveillance; and Andrew Kuehl, Message Validation, Processing, and Provisioning System;
  • 1:00–1:45 pm: “Defining the Future for NNDSS,” Lesliann Helmus, DHIS associate director for surveillance; Paula Yoon, DHIS director; and Jennifer Adjemian, DHIS Surveillance and Data Branch chief; and
  • 5:45–6:30 pm: “Implementation of ‘Country of Usual Residence’ in the 2019 Tables of National Notifiable Infectious Diseases and Conditions,” Delicia Carey and Ruth Jajosky, DHIS Surveillance Operations Team.

On Tuesday, June 4, DHIS staff will present the following two sessions:

  • 7:30–8:15 am: “NNDSS Low Incidence and International Quarantinable Disease Verification Protocol: Suggestions for Changes and Enhancements,” Ruth Jajosky, DHIS Surveillance Operations Team, and
  • 10:30–11:00 am: “Bring Your Own System: Implementing IIS Integration in Public Health Surveillance Using a System-agnostic Approach for Interoperability,” Michael Wodajo, NBS team.

On Wednesday, June 5, DHIS staff will present the following two sessions:

  • 7:30–8:15 am: “Syndromic Surveillance Policy Issues—Open Discussion,” Michael Coletta, NSSP Program Manager and session facilitator, and
  • 1:00–1:45 pm: “Informatics and CDC Emergency Response: Options for Standardizing Emergency Case Notification Messaging to CDC,” Loretta Foster, DHIS Message Mapping Guide Team.

Find more information about DHIS and its systems, programs, and initiatives at https://www.cdc.gov/csels/dhis/. Find more information about the CSTE 2019 Annual Conference at https://www.csteconference.org/2019/external icon.

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Puerto Rico Health Department Implements NBS as Surveillance System
NNDSS - Nationally Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System

The Division of Health Informatics and Surveillance (DHIS) is pleased to announce that the Puerto Rico Department of Health has successfully implemented the National Electronic Disease Surveillance System Base System (NBS) as their surveillance system on December 3, 2018. Puerto Rico, a U.S. Territory, implemented NBS by using an application service provider model where a third party vendor hosts the system for the jurisdiction and provides technical assistance.

Implementing NBS allows Puerto Rico to replace their current system, which was becoming difficult to maintain due to the complexity of the system. Now, they are able to use one system for all disease program areas.

To learn more about NBS, visit the website at https://www.cdc.gov/nbs/overview/index.html.

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Indiana Health Department Implements NBS as Surveillance System
NNDSS - Nationally Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System

The Division of Health Informatics and Surveillance (DHIS) is pleased to announce that the Indiana State Department of Health (ISDH) successfully implemented the National Electronic Disease Surveillance System Base System (NBS) as their surveillance system on January 1, 2019.  With the implementation of NBS, ISDH replaced multiple, siloed, legacy disease surveillance systems previously supported in Indiana and leveraged the full extent of functionality available in NBS.  This year-long effort was a tremendous collaboration between the ISDH project team and the NBS team that ranged from initial planning to production implementation.

ISDH realized cost savings by adopting NBS as it enabled them to retire their legacy systems that were expensive to maintain. Implementing NBS also allows Indiana to streamline the onboarding process for National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System HL7 case notifications as they can use the comprehensive templates and migration scripts provided by the NBS team for each disease or condition. In addition, with NBS, ISDH implemented functionality not available in their legacy systems, such as NBS Workflow Decision Support, which automates processing of incoming electronic laboratory reports and case reports through configurable algorithms.

To learn more about NBS, visit the website at https://www.cdc.gov/nbs/overview/index.html.

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NNDSS Announces New Message Mapping Guide for Foodborne and Diarrheal Diseases HL7 Case Notifications
NNDSS - Nationally Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System

The CDC National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS), in collaboration with the CDC National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, is pleased to announce that a finalized HL7 message mapping guide (MMG) is now available for foodborne and diarrheal diseases (FDD). Public health jurisdictions can prepare to send their FDD diseases notifications by using this MMG, which is posted on the NNDSS HL7 Case Notification Resource Center at https://wwwn.cdc.gov/nndss/case-notification/message-mapping-guides.html.

CDC developed this MMG to support public health’s response needs as part of the NNDSS Modernization Initiative (NMI). The NMI Technical Assistance and Onboarding teams are ready to assist jurisdictions in implementing the new messages and in obtaining approval to begin transmitting them.  Please contact edx@cdc.gov to request technical assistance or to begin the onboarding process.

About NNDSS
To protect Americans from serious disease, NNDSS helps public health monitor, control, and prevent about 120 diseases. These diseases are important to monitor nationwide and include infectious diseases such as Zika, foodborne outbreaks such as E. coli, and noninfectious conditions such as lead poisoning. About 3,000 public health jurisdictions gather and use data on these diseases to protect their local communities. Through NNDSS, CDC receives and uses these data to keep people healthy and defend America from health threats.

About the NNDSS Modernization Initiative
NNDSS relies on the monitoring and disease control activities performed by local and state public health jurisdictions across the country. The NNDSS Modernization Initiative is making it faster and easier for public health jurisdictions to send data to CDC, and CDC is improving how we deliver these data to our disease programs.

As part of the NMI effort and through collaboration and commitment from subject matter experts across multiple CDC national centers and involvement of jurisdiction partners and other key stakeholders, CDC is developing and adopting new-generation MMGs for HL7 case notifications. With these guides, CDC will migrate from legacy messaging structures to the widely adopted HL7 standards that provide content standardization and interoperable message exchange structures. In addition to providing core data elements and data exchange formats, these new MMGs will satisfy CDC program requests for disease-specific variables for notifiable conditions.

For more information about NMI, please access the NMI website at http://www.cdc.gov/nmi/index.html.

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NNDSS Publishes Finalized Annual Infectious Disease Data
NNDSS - Nationally Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System

CDC is pleased to announce that finalized 2017 National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS) annual infectious disease data are now available as tables on the data and statistics section of the NNDSS webpage. In addition to links to the tables, hosted by the CDC Wide-ranging Online Data for Epidemiological Research (WONDER), the website provides detailed information about the data themselves.

Highlights of the tables include the following:

  • Table 1 displays reported infectious notifiable disease case counts and rates for the United States overall.
  • Tables 2a–2q display reported infectious notifiable disease state and territory specific case counts.
  • Table 3 displays reported infectious notifiable disease cases by month for the United States overall.
  • Tables 4–7 display reported infectious notifiable disease case counts and rates by age group, sex, race, and ethnicity, respectively, for the United States overall.

The list of nationally notifiable diseases for 2017 is available on the NNDSS website along with the respective national surveillance case definitions. Surveillance case definitions are a set of uniform criteria to define a disease or condition for public health surveillance. They enable public health to classify and count cases consistently across reporting jurisdictions.

About NNDSS
To protect Americans from serious disease, NNDSS helps public health monitor, control, and prevent about 120 diseases. These diseases are important to monitor nationwide and include infectious diseases such as Zika, viral hepatitis, sexually transmitted diseases, and E. coli. About 3,000 public health jurisdictions gather data on these diseases from sources such as healthcare providers, hospitals, and laboratories and use the data to protect their local communities. Through NNDSS, CDC receives and uses these data to keep people healthy and defend America from health threats.

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Relaunched NMI Technical Assistance and Training Resource Center Improves User Navigation and Ease of Use
NNDSS - Nationally Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System

The CDC National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS) Modernization Initiative (NMI) is pleased to announce the relaunch of the NMI Technical Assistance and Training Resource Center. The NMI team incorporated user feedback from subject matter experts, partners, and public health departments to completely overhaul the structure of the original site to improve user navigation and ease of use. The NMI Technical Assistance and Training Resource Center is a one-stop-shop for users to access the guidance, tools, and help they need to implement NNDSS HL7 case notification messages and to learn more about and request technical assistance.

Key Highlights
Key highlights of the new site include the following:

  • Easy Navigation: The new site provides easy navigation to three main topics of interest to users (arboviral implementation, all other conditions implementation, and technical assistance) directly from the home page.
  • Resource Roundup: The home page also includes a roundup of resources helpful to users, including information on eSHARE, Secure Access Management Services access, and new NMI job aids. In addition, the revamped site contains a new Resources page that bundles all resources together comprehensively.
  • Arboviral Implementation Instructions Upfront: For arboviral implementation, step-by-step implementation instructions moved to the top of the webpage and are highlighted so that users can quickly find them.
  • New Implementation Process Landing Page for All Other Conditions: For implementation of all other conditions, the new site completely overhauls how the implementation process is presented by adding an implementation process landing page, complete with clickable arrows that move users through the four phases of the process. Each phase of the process has its own landing page as well, with step-by-step instructions designed to help users navigate quickly through the information and pick up where they might have left off:
  • New Technical Assistance Information and Resources: The new site also includes a comprehensive technical assistance area with four key components:
  • New NMI Job Aids: In addition, the new site incorporates a new feature called “job aids” to assist users through the NMI implementation and onboarding process. The current eight job aids cover technical assistance and onboarding and are presented as downloadable PDFs on the new NMI Job Aids roundup webpage. More job aids are planned for the future.

About NNDSS
To protect Americans from serious disease, NNDSS helps public health monitor, control, and prevent about 120 diseases. These national notifiable diseases are important to monitor nationwide and include infectious diseases such as Zika, foodborne outbreaks such as E. coli, and noninfectious conditions such as lead poisoning. About 3,000 public health jurisdictions gather and use data on these diseases to protect their local communities. Through NNDSS, CDC receives and uses these data to keep people healthy and defend America from health threats.

About the NNDSS Modernization Initiative
NNDSS relies on the monitoring and disease control activities performed by local and state public health jurisdictions across the country. The NNDSS Modernization Initiative is making it faster and easier for public health jurisdictions to send data to CDC, and CDC is improving how we deliver these data to our disease programs.

As part of the NMI effort and through collaboration and commitment from subject matter experts across multiple CDC national centers and involvement of jurisdiction partners and other key stakeholders, CDC is developing and adopting new-generation MMGs for HL7 case notifications. With these guides, CDC will migrate from legacy messaging structures to the widely adopted HL7 standards that provide content standardization and interoperable message exchange structures. In addition to providing core data elements and data exchange formats, these new MMGs will satisfy CDC program requests for disease-specific variables for notifiable conditions.

The Message Validation, Processing, and Provisioning System is new CDC-built and operated software that supports the core functions of receiving, processing, and provisioning data for nationally notifiable diseases (NND) based on HL7 standards and new technology. MVPS validates and processes NND HL7 case notification messages sent by public health jurisdictions and provisions the data to CDC programs for their national surveillance efforts.

For more information about NMI, please access the NMI website.

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DHIS AD for Surveillance Lesliann Helmus Receives 2018 CSTE Distinguished Partner Award
NNDSS - National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System

The Division of Health Informatics and Surveillance (DHIS) is pleased to announce that DHIS Associate Director (AD) for Surveillance Lesliann Helmus, MS, CHTS-CP, received the 2018 Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) Distinguished Partner Award. CSTE President Janet Hamilton, MPH; surveillance section administrator, Florida Department of Health; recognized Ms. Helmus for her achievements on June 12, 2018, at the CSTE President’s Banquet at the CSTE Annual Conference in West Palm Beach, Florida.

In her role as DHIS AD for Surveillance, Ms. Helmus coordinates surveillance activities within the division and acts as a liaison with surveillance activities in other parts of CDC. Prior to this position, she joined CDC in 2014 as the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS) Program Manager in DHIS. In this role she oversaw NNDSS activities and coordinated the NNDSS Modernization Initiative (NMI), including working with teams to develop new HL7-based message mapping guides (MMGs); design the software to validate, process, and provision NNDSS data; and provide technical assistance to submitting jurisdictions as they implement the new messages.

Prior to her role at CDC, Ms. Helmus served in epidemiology and surveillance positions at the state level in both Ohio and Virginia and chaired the CSTE Surveillance Practice and Implementation Subcommittee for many years.

Kathryn Turner, PhD, MPH; CSTE Immediate Past Surveillance and Informatics Steering Committee Chair; and deputy state epidemiologist; chief, Bureau of Communicable Disease Prevention, Idaho Division of Public Health; nominated Ms. Helmus for the award for using her experience at both the state and federal levels to produce effective and valuable collaboration between CSTE and CDC in surveillance and informatics. She noted that Ms. Helmus has served on the planning committees of the CSTE Annual Conference Surveillance and Informatics Sunday Workshop and Surveillance and Informatics Track every year and is actively involved as a CSTE Associate Member in numerous subcommittee and workgroup activities.

In addition, Dr. Turner recognized that Ms. Helmus has been key to the progress of NMI and has actively solicited input from jurisdictions regarding how NMI could benefit their day-to-day activities and how the NMI process could be improved. Ms. Helmus’s leadership has led to improved CDC program participation in NMI and shortened MMG development time to less than half of what it was when the initiative began.

“Lesliann’s leadership at the national and state level, and within CSTE, combined with the significant dedication, energy, and enthusiasm she brings to our collective efforts deserve recognition,” stated Dr. Turner. “Lesliann represents the best of public health and her professional achievements are evidence of her outstanding commitment to the field of applied epidemiology.”

The CSTE Distinguished Partner Award recognizes an individual or organizational unit who makes significant contributions to CSTE and the work of its membership over the previous year. Selection criteria include:

  • active collaboration with CSTE, its leadership, and its members;
  • significant support of the CSTE mission; and
  • impact on CSTE.
Figure 1: DHIS AD for Surveillance Lesliann Helmus, MS, CHTS-CP (left), receives the 2018 CSTE Distinguished Partner Award from CSTE President Janet Hamilton, MPH.

Figure 1: DHIS AD for Surveillance Lesliann Helmus, MS, CHTS-CP (left), receives the 2018 CSTE Distinguished Partner Award from CSTE President Janet Hamilton, MPH.

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CDC experts and invited bloggers provide blog posts on topics in health informatics and surveillance that are important to healthcare providers, public health professionals, policy makers, and the public.

MMWR: Summary of Notifiable Noninfectious Conditions and Disease Outbreaks
Vol. 64, No. 54 – August 11, 2017

Summary of Notifiable Noninfectious Conditions and Disease Outbreaks: Surveillance Data Published Between April 1, 2016 and January 31, 2017 — United States
Kimberly Thomas, MPH; Ruth Jajosky, DMD; Ralph J. Coates, PhD; et al.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2017;64:1–6.

The Summary of Notifiable Noninfectious Conditions and Disease Outbreaks: Surveillance Data Published Between April 1, 2016 and January 31, 2017 — United States contains official statistics for nationally notifiable noninfectious conditions and disease outbreaks. The Summary includes a synopsis of major findings from published surveillance reports for nationally notifiable noninfectious conditions and disease outbreaks, internet links to the complete published surveillance reports, and links to data and tables displaying current and historical descriptive statistics for each condition.

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MMWR: Summary of Notifiable Infectious Diseases
Vol. 64, No. 53 – August 11, 2017

Summary of Notifiable Infectious Diseases and Conditions — United States, 2015
Deborah A. Adams; Kimberly R. Thomas, MPH; Ruth Ann Jajosky, DMD; et al.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2017;64:1–143

Health care providers in the United States are required to report certain infectious diseases to a specified state or local authority. A disease is designated as notifiable if timely information about individual cases is considered necessary for prevention and control of the disease. Each year, CDC publishes a summary of the cases of notifiable disease reported for the most recent year for which data is available. This report presents a summary of notifiable diseases for 2015.

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2016 MMWR  Weekly noninfectious disease summaries
Vol. 63, No. 55 – October 14, 2016

Introduction to the Summary of Notifiable Noninfectious Conditions and Disease Outbreaks — United States
Ralph J. Coates, PhD; Martha Stanbury, MSPH; Ruth Jajosky, DMD; et al.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2016;63:1–4

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2016 Journal Publications (as of September 8)
  1. Coates R, Pérez A, Baer A, Zhou H, English R, Coletta M, Dey A. National and regional representativeness of hospital emergency department visit data in the National Syndromic Surveillance Program, United States, 2014. Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2016:10(4):562-569.
    http://journals.cambridge.org/download.php?file=%2FDMP%2FDMP10_04%2FS1935789315001810a.pdf&code=c487113e445000bcec9cdaa4de02bcf5/external iconExternal Web Site Icon
  2. Schafer I, Knudsen E, McNamara L, Agnihotri S, Rollin P, Islam A. The Epi Info Viral Hemorrhagic Fever (VHF) Application: A Resource for Outbreak Data Management and Contact Tracing in the 2014-2016 West Africa Ebola Epidemic. [published online ahead of print September 1, 2016] J Infect Dis. (doi: 10.1093/infdis/jiw272).
    https://jid.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2016/08/31/infdis.jiw272.abstractexternal icon

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Page last reviewed: November 15, 2019