PHPR Funding for Zika Preparedness and Response Activities

mosquito zika virus header image

In July 2016, CDC awarded $25 million in Public Health Preparedness and Response (PHPR) funding to 53 states, cities, and territories to support efforts to protect Americans from Zika virus infection and associated adverse health outcomes, including microcephaly and the other serious birth defects. The funding was effective July 1, 2016, and was available through June 2017.

CDC selected the funding recipients based on the risk of local transmission as determined by the estimated range of the two Aedes mosquito species known to transmit Zika virus in the U.S.; history of mosquito-borne disease outbreaks; and size of population.

Jurisdictions could use the funds to rapidly identify and investigate a possible outbreak of Zika virus in their communities; coordinate a comprehensive response across all levels of government and non-governmental partners (including the healthcare sector); and identify and connect families affected by Zika to community services. Funding can also be used to purchase preparedness resources like repellent, screens, and supplies for Zika Prevention Kits.

A press release announcing the July 2016 award is also available online.

In December 2016, CDC awarded an additional $25 million in PHPR funding to 21 states, cities, and territories to support efforts to protect Americans from Zika virus infection and associated adverse health outcomes, including microcephaly and the other serious birth defects. These funds were part of the $350 million Congress provided to CDC as part of the Zika supplemental funding appropriation. In addition to preparedness and response activities, the additional Zika supplemental funding supported Zika activities for epidemiology and laboratory capacity (ELC), birth defects surveillance, vector-borne disease regional centers of excellence, and the vector control unit in Puerto Rico.

PHPR Zika funding of $25 million provided support to 21 jurisdictions that were at greatest risk of seeing Zika in their communities.

Jurisdictions could use the funds to:

  • Rapidly identify and investigate a possible outbreak of Zika virus in their communities;
  • Coordinate a comprehensive response across all levels of government and nongovernmental partners (including the health care sector);
  • Identify and connect families affected by Zika to community services; and
  • Purchase preparedness resources like insect repellent, screens and supplies for Zika Prevention Kits

CDC Zika Public Health Preparedness and Response Funding Table – December 2016

Media Coverage

“These CDC funds will enable states and territories to strengthen their Zika preparedness and response plans.”

Stephen C. Redd, M.D. (RADM, USPHS), director of CDC’s Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response.

Supporting State and Local Emergency Preparedness

In addition to the Zika-specific funding, CDC has awarded $616.42 million in cooperative agreements to 62 public health departments across the country to improve and sustain emergency preparedness of state and local public health systems. The Public Health Emergency Preparedness (PHEP) cooperative agreement funding supports all-hazards preparedness and is a critical source of funding and support for the nation’s public health system. The PHEP program provides resources annually that are needed to ensure that local communities can respond effectively to infectious disease outbreaks, natural disasters, or chemical, biological, or radiological nuclear events.

Page last reviewed: October 6, 2020, 09:10 AM