Important update: Healthcare facilities
CDC has updated select ways to operate healthcare systems effectively in response to COVID-19 vaccination. Learn more
To maximize protection from the Delta variant and prevent possibly spreading it to others, get vaccinated as soon as you can and wear a mask indoors in public if you are in an area of substantial or high transmission.
UPDATE
Given new evidence on the B.1.617.2 (Delta) variant, CDC has updated the guidance for fully vaccinated people. CDC recommends universal indoor masking for all teachers, staff, students, and visitors to K-12 schools, regardless of vaccination status. Children should return to full-time in-person learning in the fall with layered prevention strategies in place.
UPDATE
The White House announced that vaccines will be required for international travelers coming into the United States, with an effective date of November 8, 2021. For purposes of entry into the United States, vaccines accepted will include FDA approved or authorized and WHO Emergency Use Listing vaccines. More information is available here.

Small and Large Gatherings

Small and Large Gatherings
Covid Gatherings Update for Fall

Small gatherings are informal in nature and may occur with family and friends you regularly socialize with, often at someone’s residence. They typically do not involve long distance travel. Small gathering guidance might be more appropriate for social gatherings that are more intimate with close friends and family, such as small holiday parties, family dinners, and special celebrations.

Large gatherings bring together many people from multiple households in a private or public space. Large gatherings are often planned events with a large number of guests and invitations. They sometimes involve lodging, event staff, security, tickets, and long-distance travel. Large events might be events such as conferences, trade shows, sporting events, festivals, concerts, or large weddings and parties.

Steps Everyone Can Take to Make Gatherings Safer

Covid Gatherings Update for Fall

If you are attending a gathering, think about the steps you need to take to protect yourself and your loved ones from COVID-19.

Know how to protect your family if you have members who are vaccinated and unvaccinated.

Safer Gatherings

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Gathering virtually or with the people you live with is the safest choice.

  • Have a virtual gathering, like a virtual party, concert or sporting event with friends and family.
  • If you do gather with people who don’t live with you, gatherings and activities held outdoors are safer than indoor gatherings.
  • Avoid crowded, poorly ventilated spaces.
  • Know what to do if your family has members or are vaccinated and unvaccinated.

 

Park Concert

Know public safety measures in place at the venue.

  • Check with the organizer or event venue for updated information about any COVID-19 safety guidelines.
  • Choose events that take place outside with enough space for attendees to stay at least 6 feet apart.

What to do if You Become Sick after Attending a Gathering

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  • Attending a large gathering or event increases your chance of being in close contact with people outside your household and being exposed to COVID-19. If you had close contact with people you don’t live with:
  • Know when to get tested for COVID-19You can visit your state or health department’s website to look for the latest local information on testing.
  • Know when to quarantine.
    • If you are unvaccinated
      • Stay home for 14 days after your last contact with a person who has COVID-19.
      • Watch for fever (100.4°F), cough, shortness of breath, or other symptoms of COVID-19.
      • If possible, stay away from others, especially people who are at higher risk for getting very sick from COVID-19.
  • If you are fully vaccinated
    • Get tested 3-5 days after the exposure, even if you don’t have any symptoms.
    • Wear a mask indoors in public for 14 days following the exposure or until your test result is negative.