Important update: Healthcare facilities
CDC has updated select ways to operate healthcare systems effectively in response to COVID-19 vaccination. Learn more
UPDATE
Given new evidence on the B.1.617.2 (Delta) variant, CDC has updated the guidance for fully vaccinated people. CDC recommends universal indoor masking for all teachers, staff, students, and visitors to K-12 schools, regardless of vaccination status. Children should return to full-time in-person learning in the fall with layered prevention strategies in place.
UPDATE
The White House announced that vaccines will be required for international travelers coming into the United States, with an effective date of November 8, 2021. For purposes of entry into the United States, vaccines accepted will include FDA approved or authorized and WHO Emergency Use Listing vaccines. More information is available here.
UPDATE
Travel requirements to enter the United States are changing, starting November 8, 2021. More information is available here.

Stay Up to Date with Your Vaccines

Stay Up to Date with Your Vaccines
  • For some immunocompromised children aged 5–11 years old, CDC now recommends an additional dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine to complete the primary series – a total of three doses. See media statement | Spanish.
  • CDC now recommends booster shots at 5 months after the completion of the primary series of Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine for those aged 12 and older. See media statement | Spanish.

COVID-19 vaccines are effective at protecting you from getting sick. Based on what we know about COVID-19 vaccines, and similar to what we know from other recommended vaccines, people who are up to date with their vaccines are well protected from serious illness or other health outcomes.

Get Vaccinated

Everyone 5 years and older is recommended to receive a primary series of a COVID-19 vaccine to be considered fully vaccinated.

For children 5 years through 17 years of age, a primary series consists of 2 doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine. For persons 18 and older, a primary series consists of:

  • A 2-dose series of an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine (Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna), or
  • A single-dose COVID-19 vaccine (Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen vaccine)

Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna (COVID-19 mRNA vaccines) are preferred. You may get Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen COVID-19 vaccine in some situations.

Stay Up to Date with Your Vaccines

CDC recommends that people remain up to date with their vaccines, which includes additional doses for individuals who are immunocompromised or booster doses at regular time points. Individuals who are moderately or severely immunocompromised should get an additional primary shot and a booster shot.

Who Should Get a Booster Shot

Ensure you are optimally protected against COVID-19 by getting vaccinated and staying up to date with a booster dose.

IF YOU RECEIVED
Pfizer-BioNTech


Who should get a booster:
Everyone 12 years and older

When to get a booster:
At least 5 months after completing your primary COVID-19 vaccination series

Which booster should you get?
Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna (mRNA COVID-19 vaccines) are preferred in most* situations

Teens 12–17 years old may only get a Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine booster

IF YOU RECEIVED
Moderna


Who should get a booster:
Adults 18 years and older

When to get a booster:
At least 6 months after completing your primary COVID-19 vaccination series

Which booster should you get?
Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna (mRNA COVID-19 vaccines) are preferred in most* situations

IF YOU RECEIVED
Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen*


Who should get a booster:
Adults 18 years and older

When to get a booster:
At least 2 months after receiving your J&J/Janssen COVID-19 vaccination

Which booster should you get?
Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna (mRNA COVID-19 vaccines) are preferred in most* situations

*Although mRNA vaccines are preferred, J&J/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine may be considered in some situations.

IF YOU RECEIVED
Pfizer-BioNTech

Who should get a booster:

  • Everyone 12 years and older

When to get a booster:

  • At least 5 months after completing your primary COVID-19 vaccination series

Which booster can you get:

  • Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna (mRNA COVID-19 vaccines) are preferred in most* situations
  • Teens 12–17 years old may only get a Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine booster

IF YOU RECEIVED
Moderna

Who should get a booster:

  • Adults 18 years and older

When to get a booster:

  • At least 6 months after completing your primary COVID-19 vaccination series

Which booster can you get:

  • Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna (mRNA COVID-19 vaccines) are preferred in most* situations

IF YOU RECEIVED
Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen*

Who should get a booster:

  • Adults 18 years and older

When to get a booster:

  • At least 2 months after receiving your J&J/Janssen COVID-19 vaccination

Which booster can you get:

  • Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna (mRNA COVID-19 vaccines) are preferred in most* situations

*Although mRNA vaccines are preferred, J&J/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine may be considered in some situations.

Data Supporting Need for a Booster Shot

Studies show after getting vaccinated against COVID-19, protection decreases over time and may also be decreased due to changes in circulating variants. The recent emergence of the Omicron variant further increases the importance of vaccination and boosters to protect against COVID-19.

CDC provides recommendations in real-time on how to keep you best protected against SARS-CoV-2. Current surveillance data from the United States demonstrate that it is critically important for people to remain up to date with CDC’s vaccine recommendations. In November, those who were unvaccinated were more than 3 times more likely to test positive for infection compared to those who were vaccinated and more than 9 times likely compared to those who were boosted.

Additional studies from around the world demonstrate the benefit of a booster dose over receiving only a primary series.

  • In large national studies from Israel comparing those who are boosted with those who are fully vaccinated, a booster dose decreased infection by 10 times in all age groups.
  • Booster doses also decreased severe disease by 18 times in individuals over 60 years old and 22 times in those who were 40 to 59 years old.
  • In these studies, a booster dose decreased mortality due to COVID-19 by 90% compared to being fully vaccinated.

CDC will continue to follow the evidence related to vaccine effectiveness and safety, waning immunity and protection against variants and will keep recommendations current on how to stay up to date with your COVID-19 vaccines.