Important update: Healthcare facilities
CDC has updated select ways to operate healthcare systems effectively in response to COVID-19 vaccination. Learn more
UPDATE
Given new evidence on the B.1.617.2 (Delta) variant, CDC has updated the guidance for fully vaccinated people. CDC recommends universal indoor masking for all teachers, staff, students, and visitors to K-12 schools, regardless of vaccination status. Children should return to full-time in-person learning in the fall with layered prevention strategies in place.
UPDATE
The White House announced that vaccines will be required for international travelers coming into the United States, with an effective date of November 8, 2021. For purposes of entry into the United States, vaccines accepted will include FDA approved or authorized and WHO Emergency Use Listing vaccines. More information is available here.
UPDATE
Travel requirements to enter the United States are changing, starting November 8, 2021. More information is available here.

Selected Adverse Events Reported after COVID-19 Vaccination

Selected Adverse Events Reported after COVID-19 Vaccination
Updated Nov. 28, 2022
Safety of COVID-19 Vaccines

Some people have no side effects. Many people have reported side effects, such as headache, fatigue, and soreness at the injection site, that are generally mild to moderate and go away within a few days.

What You Need to Know

  • COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective and severe reactions after vaccination are rare.
  • CDC recommends everyone ages 5 years and older get vaccinated as soon as possible to protect against COVID-19 and its potentially severe complications.
  • Although mRNA vaccines (Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna COVID-19 vaccines) are preferred, Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen COVID-19 vaccine may be considered in some situations.
  • Millions of people in the United States have received COVID-19 vaccines under the most intense safety monitoring program in U.S. history.
  • CDC, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and other federal agencies continue to monitor the safety of COVID-19 vaccines.
  • Adverse events described on this page have been reported to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS).
  • VAERS accepts reports of any adverse event following vaccination.

The benefits of COVID-19 vaccination continue to outweigh any potential risks.

CDC is providing timely updates on the following adverse events of interest:

  • 12–15 years (70.7 cases per one million doses of Pfizer-BioNTech)
  • 16–17 years (105.9 cases per one million doses of Pfizer-BioNTech)
  • 18–24 years (52.4 cases and 56.3 cases per million doses of Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna, respectively)

Multiple studies and reviews of data from vaccine safety monitoring systems continue to show that vaccines are safe. As a result, the agency will refocus enhanced surveillance and safety monitoring efforts toward children and adolescents.

As of November 24, 2022, there have been 1,045 preliminary reports in VAERS among people younger than age 18 years under review for potential cases of myocarditis and pericarditis. Of these, 248 remain under review. Through confirmation of symptoms and diagnostics by provider interview or review of medical records, 697 reports have been verified to meet CDC’s working case definition for myocarditis. See below for counts of verified reports of myocarditis by age group.

5-11 years: 23 verified reports of myocarditis after 21,879,424 doses administered

12-15 years: 362 verified reports of myocarditis after 24,613,382 doses administered

16-17 years: 312 verified reports of myocarditis after 13,508,250 doses administered

As the COVID-19 vaccines are authorized for younger children, CDC and FDA will continue to monitor for and evaluate reports of myocarditis and pericarditis after COVID-19 vaccination and will share more information as it becomes available. Learn more about myocarditis and pericarditis, including clinical considerations, after mRNA COVID-19 vaccination.

  • Reports of death after COVID-19 vaccination are rare. FDA requires healthcare providers to report any death after COVID-19 vaccination to VAERS, even if it’s unclear whether the vaccine was the cause. Reports of adverse events to VAERS following vaccination, including deaths, do not necessarily mean that a vaccine caused a health problem. More than 653 million doses of COVID-19 vaccines were administered in the United States from December 14, 2020, through November 24, 2022. During this time, VAERS received 17,640 preliminary reports of death (0.0027%) among people who received a COVID-19 vaccine. CDC and FDA clinicians review reports of death to VAERS including death certificates, autopsy, and medical records. Continued monitoring has identified nine deaths causally associated with J&J/Janssen COVID-19 vaccination. CDC and FDA continue to review reports of death following COVID-19 vaccination and update information as it becomes available.