IF YOU ARE FULLY VACCINATED
CDC has updated its guidance for people who are fully vaccinated. See Recommendations for Fully Vaccinated People.
IMPORTANT UPDATE FOR SCHOOLS
CDC recommends schools continue to use the current COVID-19 prevention strategies for the 2020-2021 school year. Learn more
Important update: Healthcare facilities
CDC has updated select ways to operate healthcare systems effectively in response to COVID-19 vaccination. Learn more

Travel: Frequently Asked Questions and Answers

Travel: Frequently Asked Questions and Answers
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General

Check CDC’s Domestic Travel or International Travel pages for the latest recommendations for fully vaccinated and unvaccinated travelers.

If you had COVID-19 in the past 3 months, follow all requirements and recommendations for fully vaccinated travelers except:

We know that people can continue to test positive for up to 3 months after they had COVID-19 and not be infectious to others.

See CDC’s website What to Do If You Are Sick.

Domestic Travel

Yes. CDC recommends delaying travel until you are fully vaccinated, because travel increases your chance of getting and spreading COVID-19. If you are not fully vaccinated and must travel, follow CDC’s Domestic Travel or International Travel recommendations for unvaccinated people.

CDC does not require travelers to undergo a mandatory federal quarantine. However, CDC recommends that unvaccinated travelers self-quarantine after travel for 7 days with a negative test and for 10 days if they don’t get tested.

Check CDC’s Domestic Travel pages for the latest recommendations for fully vaccinated and unvaccinated travelers.

Follow all state and local recommendations or requirements.

International Travel

CDC reviews data reported to the World Health Organization daily to determine a destination’s COVID-19 Travel Health Notice level. There are a few factors that CDC considers when determining the level of a destination. To find out more about the COVID-19 Travel Health Notice levels, visit How CDC Determines the Level for COVID-19 Travel Health Notices.

These notices offer travel recommendations based on the level of COVID-19 in a destination. To learn more about COVID-19 travel recommendations for a specific destination, visit COVID-19 Travel Recommendations by Destination.

Recommendations are updated weekly. CDC reviews data reported to the World Health Organization daily to determine a destination’s COVID-19 Travel Health Notice level and makes appropriate level changes once a week. To find out more about the COVID-19 Travel Health Notice levels, visit How CDC Determines the Level for COVID-19 Travel Health Notices.

Check with your destination’s Office of Foreign Affairs or Ministry of Health or the U.S. Department of State, Bureau of Consular Affairs, Country Informationexternal icon for details about entry requirements and restrictions for arriving travelers.

All air passengers coming to the United States, including U.S. citizens and fully vaccinated people, are required to have a negative COVID-19 test result no more than 3 days before travel or documentation of recovery from COVID-19 in the past 3 months before they board a flight to the United States.

CDC does not require travelers to undergo a mandatory federal quarantine. However, CDC recommends that unvaccinated travelers self-quarantine after travel for 7 days with a negative test and for 10 days if they don’t get tested.

Check CDC’s International Travel pages for the latest recommendations for vaccinated and unvaccinated travelers.

Follow all state and local recommendations or requirements.

Air or Cruise Travel

Yes. Air travel requires spending time in security lines and airport terminals, which can bring you in close contact with other people and frequently touched surfaces. Most viruses and other germs do not spread easily on flights because of how air circulates and is filtered on airplanes. However, social distancing is difficult on crowded flights, and you may have to sit near others (within 6 feet), sometimes for hours. This may increase your risk for exposure to the virus that causes COVID-19.

Masks are required on planes, buses, trains, and other forms of public transportation traveling into, within, or out of the United States and in U.S. transportation hubs such as airports and stations.

Under current federal regulations, pilots must report all illnesses and deaths to CDC before arriving to a U.S. destination. According to CDC protocols, if a sick traveler has a contagious disease that is a risk to others on board the airplane, CDC works with local and state health departments and international public health agencies to contact exposed passengers and crew.

Be sure to give the airline your current contact information when booking your ticket so you can be notified if you are exposed to a sick traveler on a flight.

For more information, see the CDC webpage Protecting Travelers’ Health from Airport to Community: Investigating Contagious Diseases on Flights.

Yes. CDC recommends that all travelers avoid all cruise ship travel worldwide, including river boats. Reports of COVID-19 on cruise ships highlight the risk of infection to cruise ship passengers and crew. Like many other viruses, COVID-19 appears to spread more easily between people in close quarters aboard ships. At this time, cruise ship passenger operations remain suspended in U.S. waters under CDC’s Framework for Conditional Sailing Order.

For information about traveling in the United States: Travel During the COVID-19 Pandemic