Important update: Healthcare facilities
CDC has updated select ways to operate healthcare systems effectively in response to COVID-19 vaccination. Learn more
UPDATE
Given new evidence on the B.1.617.2 (Delta) variant, CDC has updated the guidance for fully vaccinated people. CDC recommends universal indoor masking for all teachers, staff, students, and visitors to K-12 schools, regardless of vaccination status. Children should return to full-time in-person learning in the fall with layered prevention strategies in place.
UPDATE
The White House announced that vaccines will be required for international travelers coming into the United States, with an effective date of November 8, 2021. For purposes of entry into the United States, vaccines accepted will include FDA approved or authorized and WHO Emergency Use Listing vaccines. More information is available here.
UPDATE
Travel requirements to enter the United States are changing, starting November 8, 2021. More information is available here.

Get a Jump on Spring

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Interpretive Summary for April 15, 2022

Get a Jump on Spring

Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, many people have delayed or avoided medical care, including routine, urgent, and emergency care. If it’s something you’ve neglected, it’s time to jump back in—consider putting “get a checkup” on top of your to-do list, especially if you’re at risk for heart disease. Regular checkups provide the opportunity to prevent, screen for, and manage chronic conditions, and to get routine vaccinations.

Nearly one million people in the United States have died from COVID-19. People who have heart conditions are more likely to get very sick from COVID-19, and cardiovascular disease is still the leading cause of death in the country. Deaths from cardiovascular disease have increased during the pandemic.

In addition to seeing your healthcare provider, explore ways to improve and maintain heart health, today and every day. Consider eating a healthy diet, being active, getting enough sleep, avoiding tobacco and excessive drinking, and learning to cope with stress in a healthy way. Simple activities like deep breathing, physical activity, and safely connecting with family, friends, and neighbors can also improve your general well-being and outlook on life. And as always, we encourage everyone to stay up to date on their COVID-19 vaccinations.

*People ages 12 years and older who are moderately or severely immunocompromised have specific COVID-19 vaccine recommendations, including recommendations for a booster dose. Learn more about COVID-19 vaccine recommendations for people who are moderately or severely immunocompromised.

COVID-19 Community Levels

On February 25, 2022, CDC updated the way it monitors COVID-19’s impact on our communities. Widespread availability of vaccines and testing, advances in treatments, and increasing levels of immunity in the population through vaccination or previous infection have moved the COVID-19 pandemic to a new phase. While we can’t prevent all cases of COVID-19, we can continue to limit the spread and protect those who are most at risk of severe illness.

Currently, there are 14 (0.43%) counties, districts, or territories with a high COVID-19 Community Level, 175 (5.43%) counties with a medium Community Level, and 3,035 (94.14%) counties with a low Community Level. This represents a very slight (−0.19%) decrease in the number of high-level counties, a small (+1.55%) increase in the number of medium-level counties, and a corresponding (−1.36%) decrease in the number of low-level counties. Twenty-two (39.28%) of 56 jurisdictions had no high- or medium-level counties this week.

To check your COVID-19 community level, visit COVID Data Tracker.

U.S. COVID-19 Community Levels by County

map showing U.S. COVID-19 Community Levels by County 04-15-2022 legend for map green is low yellow is medium orange is high grey is no data

Reported Cases

As of April 13, 2022, the current 7-day moving average of daily new cases (31,391) increased 19.1% compared with the previous 7-day moving average (26,357). A total of 80,341,159 COVID-19 cases have been reported in the United States as of April 13, 2022.

CDC Nowcast projections* for the week ending April 9, 2022, estimate the combined national proportion of lineages designated as Omicron to be 100%. There are five lineages designated as Omicron: B.1.1.529, BA.1, BA.1.1, BA.2, and BA.3. COVID Data Tracker shows the proportions of the B.1.1.529 lineage (includes BA.1 and BA.3), the BA.1.1** lineage, and the BA.2 lineage. The predominant Omicron lineage in the United States is BA.2. The national proportion of BA.2 is projected to be 85.9% (95% PI 83.6-87.8%). BA.1.1 is projected to be 13.1% (95% PI 11.3-15.2%) and B.1.1.529 (BA.1 and BA.3) is projected to be 1.0% (95% PI 0.8-1.3%). Omicron is predicted to be 100% in all HHS regions.

80,341,159
Total Cases Reported

80,341,159
Total Cases Reported

31,391
Current 7-Day Average**

31,391
Current 7-Day Average**

26,357
Prior 7-Day Average

26,357
Prior 7-Day Average

19.1%
Change in 7-Day Average since Prior Week 

19.1%
Change in 7-Day Average since Prior Week 

*The median time from specimen collection to sequence data reporting is about 3 weeks. As a result, weighted estimates for the most recent few weeks may be unstable or unavailable. CDC’s Nowcast is a data projection tool that helps fill this gap by generating timely estimates of variant proportions for variants that are circulating in the United States. View Nowcast estimates on CDC’s COVID Data Tracker website on the Variant Proportions page.

**For national data, the proportion of BA.1.1 is shown separately. For regional data, the proportion of BA.1.1 is also aggregated with B.1.1.529.

***Historical cases are excluded from daily new cases and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset for the applicable date. Of 521,394 historical cases reported retroactively, 4,203 were reported in the current week and 12,690 were reported in the prior week.

Daily Trends in COVID-19 Cases in the United States Reported to CDC

red line

7-Day moving average

A bar graph showing daily trends in COVID-19 cases in the United States and a line with the 7-day moving average.

Vaccinations

The U.S. COVID-19 Vaccination Program began December 14, 2020. As of April 13, 2022, 567.2 million vaccine doses have been administered in the United States. Overall, about 256.5 million people, or 77.3% of the total U.S. population, have received at least one dose of vaccine. About 218.6 million people, or 65.8% of the total U.S. population, have been fully vaccinated.* Of those fully vaccinated, about 99.0 million people have received a booster dose,** but 49.6% of the total booster-eligible population has not yet received a booster dose. As of April 13, 2022, the 7-day average number of administered vaccine doses reported (by date of CDC report) to CDC per day was 542,444, a 27.7% increase from the previous week.

CDC’s COVID Data Tracker displays vaccination trends by age group, race/ethnicity, and urban/rural status. To see trends by age group and race/ethnicity, visit the Vaccination Demographic Trends tab. To see trends by urban/rural status, visit the  COVID-19 Vaccination Equity tab.

567,188,881
Vaccine Doses Administered

567,188,881 Vaccine Doses Administered

567,188,881
Vaccine Doses Administered

256,489,187
People who received at least one dose

567,188,881 Vaccine Doses Administered

256,489,187
People who received at least one dose

218,622,907
People who are fully vaccinated*

218,622,907
People who are fully vaccinated*

77.3%
Percentage of the U.S. population that has received at least one dose

567,188,881 Vaccine Doses Administered

77.3%
Percentage of the U.S. population that has received at least one dose

65.8%
Percentage of the U.S. population that has been fully vaccinated*

65.8%
Percentage of the U.S. population that has been fully vaccinated*

+0.2
Percentage point increase from last week

567,188,881 Vaccine Doses Administered

+0.2
Percentage point increase from last week

+0.1
Percentage point increase from last week

+0.1
Percentage point increase from last week

*Represents the number of people who have received the second dose in a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine series (such as the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccines) or one dose of the single-shot Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen vaccine.

**Represents the number of people who are fully vaccinated and have received another dose of COVID-19 vaccine since August 13, 2021. This includes people who received their first additional dose or booster dose.

Daily Change in the Total Number of Administered COVID-19 Vaccine Doses Reported to CDC by the Date of CDC Report, United States

red line

7-Day moving average

Chart showing Daily Change in the Total Number of Administered COVID-19 Vaccine Doses Reported to CDC by the Date of CDC Report, United States 04-15-2022

Hospitalizations

New Hospital Admissions

The current 7-day daily average for April 6–April 12, 2022, was 1,446. This is a 1.3% increase from the prior 7-day average (1,427) from March 29–April 4, 2022.

4,612,454
Total New Admissions

4,612,454
Total New Admissions

1,446
Current 7-Day Average

1,446
Current 7-Day Average

1,427
Prior 7-Day Average

1,427
Prior 7-Day Average

+1.3%
Change in 7-Day Average

+1.3%
Change in 7-Day Average

The start of consistent reporting of hospital admissions data was August 1, 2020.

Daily Trends in Number of New COVID-19 Hospital Admissions in the United States

A bar graph showing daily trends in number of new COVID-19 hospital admissions in the United States.

New admissions are pulled from a 10 am EDT snapshot of the HHS Unified Hospital Data – Analytic Dataset. Due to potential reporting delays, data from the most recent 7 days, as noted in the figure above with the grey bar, should be interpreted with caution. Small shifts in historic data may also occur due to changes in the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Provider of Services file, which is used to identify the cohort of included hospitals.

COVID-NET: Hospitalization Rates by Vaccination Status in Children Ages 5–11 Years

CDC’s Coronavirus Disease 2019-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) shows that rates of COVID-19-associated hospitalizations in February 2022 were 2 times as high among unvaccinated children ages 5–11 years compared to adolescents who received a COVID-19 primary vaccination series.*

*Compared to older age groups, children ages 5–11 years have very low rates of hospitalization for any vaccination status. As a result, hospitalization rates by vaccination status for this age group might have more week-to-week variability due to small sample sizes.

Rates of COVID-19-Associated Hospitalizations by Vaccination Status in Children Ages 5–11 Years, January–February 2022

A line graph showing weekly rates of COVID-19-associated hospitalization among children ages 5-11, by vaccination status.

The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) is an additional source for hospitalization data collected through a network of more than 250 acute-care hospitals in 14 states (representing ~10% of the U.S. population). Detailed data on patient demographics, including race/ethnicity, underlying medical conditions, medical interventions, and clinical outcomes, are collected using a standardized case reporting form.

More COVID-NET Data

Deaths

The current 7-day moving average of new deaths (409) has decreased 15.7% compared with the previous 7-day moving average (486). As of April 13, 2022, a total of 984,744 COVID-19 deaths have been reported in the United States.

984,744
Total Deaths Reported

984,744
Total Deaths Reported

409
Current 7-Day Average*

409
Current 7-Day Average*

486
Prior 7-Day Average

486
Prior 7-Day Average

-15.7%
Change in 7-Day Average Since Prior Week

-15.7%
Change in 7-Day Average Since Prior Week

*Historical deaths are excluded from the daily new deaths and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset by their applicable date. Of 21,064 historical deaths reported retroactively, 320 were reported in the current week; and none were reported in the prior week.

Daily Trends in Number of COVID-19 Deaths in the United States Reported to CDC

red line

7-Day moving average

A map of the United States with each state shaded according to COVID-19 NAAT laboratory test 7-day percent positivity. More Death Data

Testing

The percentage of COVID-19 NAATs (nucleic acid amplification tests)* that are positive (percent positivity) is increasing in comparison to the previous week. The 7-day average of percent positivity from NAATs is now 4.1%. The 7-day average number of tests reported for April 1-7, 2022 was 684,558, down 14.6% from 801,485 for the prior 7 days.

857,920,235
Total Tests Reported

857,920,235 Total Tests Reported

857,920,235
Total Tests Reported

684,558
7-Day Average Tests Reported

857,920,235 Total Tests Reported

684,558
7-Day Average Tests Reported

4.1%
7-Day Average % Positivity

4.1%
7-Day Average % Positivity

2.8%
Previous 7-Day Average % Positivity

857,920,235 Total Tests Reported

2.8%
Previous 7-Day Average % Positivity

+1.28
Percentage point change in 7-Day Average % Positivity since Prior Week

+1.28
Percentage point change in 7-Day Average % Positivity since Prior Week

*Test for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19

COVID-19 NAAT Laboratory Test 7-day Percent Positivity by State/Territory

A map of the United States with each state shaded according to COVID-19 NAAT laboratory test 7-day percent positivity.