Ask CDC - About CDC

Does CDC have any job openings or training or fellowship opportunities?
Image of scientist looking at a microscope slide

Information about employment and career opportunities with CDC can be found on the CDC Website.

There, you can search CDC job openings available to:

  • Current federal employees,
  • Current CDC employees, and
  • Members of the general public.

You can also learn more about:

  • CDC’s training and fellowship programs,
  • Benefits available to CDC employees, and
  • How to apply online for CDC positions through the USAJOBS WebsiteExternal.

You can contact the CDC Human Resources (HR) help desk at 770-488-1725 or hrcs@cdc.gov.

For volunteer opportunities, visit the Working at CDC Website and click on the Volunteer Opportunity Announcements hyperlink.

CDC Resources

How Do I Apply for Opportunities at CDC?

Employment: Applicant Resources

Pathways for Students and Graduates

What is the role of CDC-INFO?
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The role of CDC-INFO is to provide reliable, consistent, science-based health information on behalf of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). CDC-INFO is not a part of CDC; however, CDC has reviewed and authorized the information that CDC-INFO provides.

CDC-INFO also provides referrals to local health departments, clinics, and testing sites in your area.

CDC-INFO is not a consumer advocacy group. It does not enforce product safety or protect consumers’ rights.

Also, CDC-INFO does not provide counseling, diagnoses, or personal medical advice. Please see your healthcare provider for these needs.

What is the process for submitting specimens to CDC infectious diseases laboratories?

CDC accepts specimens from state public health laboratories and other federal agencies. Specimens from private healthcare providers and institutions must be submitted to the state, county, or city health department laboratory for processing.

Private citizens, health practitioners, and/or hospitals must contact their county or city health department to submit specimens. If the local health department is unable to make a determination on where and how to submit a specimen, it will forward the specimen to the state health department.

A completed Form 50.34 CDC Specimen Submission Form must be supplied with each specimen received at CDC (one specimen per form). If a submitter is sending in a large number of specimens, the submitter may work with CDC infectious diseases laboratories to submit specimens using a batch form.

For help with submitting specimens to a CDC lab, visit the Infectious Diseases Specimen Submission IDSS Website or contact the IDSS Help Desk. The IDSS Help Desk is open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST Monday through Friday (closed on federal holidays).

CDC Resources

Submitting Specimens to CDC

Infectious Diseases Laboratories

Infectious Diseases Specimen Submission (IDSS) Help Desk
E-mail: CDC_ID_lab_info@cdc.gov
Toll Free: 1-855-612-7575

How can I get a copy of a birth, death, marriage or divorce certificate?

The federal government does not distribute vital records, such as birth, death, marriage, and divorce certificates. To obtain a vital record, please contact the state or local vital statistics office where the event occurred.

Go to the National Center for Health Statistics’ Where to Write for Vital Records Website, then click on the state or area where the birth, death, marriage, or divorce occurred. To obtain foreign birth or death certificates and marriage records, look under “F” and click on “Foreign or high-seas events.”

CDC Resources

Where to Write for Vital Records: Foreign Birth and Death Certificates

National Center for Health Statistics

What does CDC do?
Image of scientist in protective uniform, with protective eye and mouth covers

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)External. CDC is the main federal agency that conducts and supports public health activities in the U.S.

CDC works 24/7 with others to create the expertise, information, and tools that people and communities need to protect their health by:

  • Promoting health;
  • Preventing disease, injury, and disability; and
  • Preparing (being ready) for new health threats.

You can learn more about CDC, its mission, and its activities by visiting the CDC Website.

CDC Resources

CDC Fact Sheet

About CDC

CDC Organization

Can someone from CDC speak at my event?

If you want a CDC representative to speak at your event, visit CDC’s Speakers Bureau Website and complete the Speaker Request Form.

If you want the CDC director to speak at your event, complete the Director Speaker Request Form. You can state in your request whether you will accept another CDC representative if the director is not able to attend.

CDC asks that you allow 6 to 8 weeks for your request to be processed. Be sure to leave enough time to make other plans in case CDC is unable to provide a speaker.

To request a CDC representative for a handwashing demonstration, career day, or health fair, e-mail your event information to commrelations@cdc.gov. These types of events only need 2 weeks’ advance notice.

If you haven’t received a response from the Speakers Bureau after 5 business days, e-mail speakersbureau@cdc.gov.

The demand for speakers is high, so not all requests can be honored. All incoming speaker requests are carefully reviewed to ensure they:

CDC speakers are not allowed to participate in events for the purposes of fundraising, promotions, or any type of endorsements.

You can also contact your local or state health department for a speaker. CDC works closely with state and local health departments, and they are an excellent source for public health speakers.

CDC Resources

CDC Speakers Bureau: Director Speaker Request Form
404-498-0142

CDC Speakers Bureau

Public Health Resources: State Health Departments

Handwashing Demonstrations, Career Day, and Health Fair Information
commrelations@cdc.gov

Can I interview a CDC employee for homework or a school research project?

CDC employees are not available for interviews for school research projects or homework. However, you can contact your local health department and ask to speak to someone with expertise in your research topic.

You can also visit CDC’s Media Relations Website for press releases, digital press kits, and other media information relevant to your research, some of which might contain quotable text from CDC scientists and experts.

CDC Resources

Student and Educator Resources

Media Relations

Page last reviewed: January 23, 2018