HPV-Associated Cervical Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity

It is estimated that about 12,000 new cases of HPV-associated cervical cancer are diagnosed in the United States each year.* More black and Hispanic women get HPV-associated cervical cancer than women of other races or ethnicities, possibly because of decreased access to Pap testing or follow-up treatment.

*Note: This study used cancer registry data to estimate the amount of HPV-associated cancer in the United States by examining cancer in parts of the body and cancer cell types that are more likely to be caused by HPV. Cancer registries do not collect data on the presence or absence of HPV in cancer tissue at the time of diagnosis. In general, HPV is thought to be responsible for about 91% of HPV-associated cervical cancers.

About 8 black women, 7 white women, 6 American Indian/Alaska Native women, and 6 Asian/Pacific Islander women were diagnosed with HPV-associated cervical cancer per 100,000 women. About 9 Hispanic women were diagnosed with HPV-associated cervical cancer per 100,000 women, compared to 7 non-Hispanic women.

Data are from population-based cancer registries participating in CDC’s National Program of Cancer Registries (NPCR) and/or the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program for 2012 to 2016, covering 100% of the U.S. population.

U.S. Cancer Statistics Data Visualizations Tool

The Data Visualizations tool makes it easy for anyone to explore and use the latest official federal government cancer data from United States Cancer Statistics. It includes the latest cancer data covering 100% of the U.S. population.

The Data Visualizations tool shows rates for HPV-associated cervical cancers.

Photo of a person looking at data on a digital tablet

References

Data source: National Program of Cancer Registries SEER*Stat Database: U.S. Cancer Statistics Incidence Analytic file 1998–2016. United States Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Released June 2019, based on the November 2018 submission.

Viens LJ, Henley SJ, Watson M, Markowitz LE, Thomas CC, Thompson TD, Razzaghi H, Saraiya M, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Human papillomavirus–associated cancers—United States, 2008–2012. MMWR 2016;65(26):661–666.