Cancer Research

CDC’s Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC) conducts and supports studies, often in collaboration with partners, to develop and apply sound science to reduce the burden of cancer and eliminate health disparities. This research uses many different areas of expertise (behavioral science, economics, epidemiology, health services, medicine, and statistics) to address the public health research needs of DCPC programs, health care providers, people affected by cancer, and the larger comprehensive cancer control community.

Use our Citation Search Tool to find scientific articles by title, journal, author, year of publication, and topic. Also see our U.S. Cancer Statistics data briefs.

Featured Research

Infographic: Potentially Unnecessary Bimanual Pelvic and Pap Examinations in Females Aged 15 to 20 Years. Pelvic and Pap exams in females under 21 are not recommended for screening and can cause harms such as unnecessary medical procedures, fear, and anxiety. Screening exams are those done in people without symptoms. Unnecessary pelvic exams occurred among 1.4 million young females in the past year. Unnecessary Pap tests occurred among 1.6 million young females in the past year. Efforts to avoid unnecessary exams in females under 21 include educating health care providers about when exams are necessary and encouraging parents and patients to ask health care providers about when exams are appropriate.

Pelvic and Pap exams in females under 21 are not recommended for screening and can cause harms such as unnecessary medical procedures, fear, and anxiety. Unnecessary pelvic exams occurred among 1.4 million young females in the past year. Unnecessary Pap tests occurred among 1.6 million young females in the past year. Read Article »external icon

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DCPC scientists author or co-author many articles that are published in scientific journals each year. Selected articles have been summarized.
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Some cancer risk factors can be linked closely to certain age ranges. While you can’t avoid getting older, some cancers appear later in life because of actions taken over many years. CDC scientists and other experts created the Cancer Prevention Across the Lifespan workgroup to learn how cancer can be prevented at different ages.
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The Cancer Research Citation Search tool allows you to find CDC’s latest cancer research quickly.
Page last reviewed: January 7, 2020