A Closer Look at African American Men and High Blood Pressure Control

African American Men and High Blood Pressure Control cover.

A Review of Psychosocial Factors and Systems-Level Interventions

High blood pressure affects nearly 1 in 2 adults in the United States.1 This condition, also known as the “silent killer,” increases your risk of heart disease and stroke.

Because high blood pressure control is a public health priority, several CDC efforts (e.g., State Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention programs, WISEWOMAN, Coverdell Program, etc.) are supported through funding and provision of technical assistance. In addition, eliminating health disparities among various segments of the population are also a CDC priority and a Healthy People 2030external icon goal.

High blood pressure is more common in non-Hispanic Black adults (54%) than in non-Hispanic white adults (46%), non-Hispanic Asian adults (39%), or Hispanic adults (36%).1 A heightened response is required due to the disparities in high blood pressure control in African American men.

In order to provide a resource for public health programs, including the State HDSP programs, that addresses high blood pressure control in this population, the book A Closer Look at African American Men and High Blood Pressure Control: A Review of Psychosocial Factors and Systems-Level Interventions.

Published in 2010, the book and executive summary consist of the following information:

  • Burden data pertaining to African American men and high blood pressure.
  • Effective and culturally appropriate promising practices and interventions.
  • A list of men’s health informational resources.

Public health programs that desire to develop, implement, expand, or evaluate interventions targeting African American men can use these documents to gain additional insight and direction.

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Reference

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Hypertension Cascade: Hypertension Prevalence, Treatment and Control Estimates Among US Adults Aged 18 Years and Older Applying the Criteria From the American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association’s 2017 Hypertension Guideline—NHANES 2013–2016.external icon Atlanta, GA: US Department of Health and Human Services; 2019.