Case-control study in ALS using the National ALS Registry: lead and agricultural chemicals are potential risk factors

Affiliates Hiroshi Mitsumoto [1] , Diana C. Garofalo [2], Madison Gilmore [1] , Leslie Andrews [3], Regina M. Santella [4] , Howard Andrews [5] , Martin McElhiney [6] , Jennifer Murphy [7], Jeri W. Nieves [2], Judith Rabkin [6], Jonathan Hupf [1], D. Kevin Horton [8], Paul Mehta [8], and Pam Factor-Litvak [2]

 

[1] Department of Neurology, Columbia University Irving Medical Center
[2] Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University
[3] Department of Environmental Health, Columbia University
[4] Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University
[5] Department of Biostatistics, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University and New York State Psychiatric Institute
[6] Department of Clinical Psychology, Columbia University and New York State Psychiatric Institute
[7] Department of Neurology, University of California
[8] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Agency for Toxic Substance and Disease Registry (CDC/ATSDR)

Journal Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Frontotemporal Degeneration
Summary This study examines the relationship between occupational exposure to lead and pesticides as potential causes of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Increased risk of ALS diagnosis was reported among those with occupational exposure to lead and agricultural chemicals. Moreover, increased measures of oxidative stress thought to be resulting from these exposures was more frequently reported amongst cases compared to controls.
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