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Global Health

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In today’s highly mobile and interconnected world, germs threaten everyone. CDC protects Americans by rapidly detecting and containing health threats anywhere in the world before they can come to the U.S. CDC has a staff of nearly 1,700 in 62 countries supporting strong, effective public health systems, and training for health professionals to identify outbreaks in their own countries to prevent threats from crossing borders. We also work to make sure people have access to safe water and sanitation around the world, which is a critical step to prevent disease and stop other health threats.

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4 billion

The Global Health Security Agenda aims to build the incountry capacity for response to protect 4 billion people over 5 years in more than 30 countries.

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425,000

CDC, through the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), supports 21 countries and provides about 425,000 HIV-positive pregnant women with antiretroviral drugs for HIV treatment to prevent mother-to-child transmission.

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93%

CDC conducted mass drug administration for lymphatic filariasis in 93% of the communes in Haiti, reducing cases to below 1% and proving how it could be stopped in these areas.

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1,700

CDC has more than 1,700 staff working in more than 60 countries to promote global health and protect against the spread of global health threats such as Ebola.

Key Accomplishments 2015

  • Completed 5-year strategic planning for 17 countries designated as
    Phase I under the Global Health Security Agenda so that we can help
    develop health systems that prevent avoidable epidemics, detect
    threats early, and respond rapidly and effectively.
  • Established a Global Rapid Response Team that contributed to 5
    outbreak responses in Gabon, Indonesia, Sierra Leone, and Tanzania.
  • Reached the United Nation’s Millennium Development Goal of
    starting 15 million people on lifesaving HIV treatment by 2015 (nine
    months ahead of schedule) through CDC’s work with PEPFAR.
  • Reached World Health Organization’s milestone of having zero cases
    of polio in Africa after Nigeria marked a full year without a new case of
    naturally occurring polio. Now, only Pakistan and Afghanistan still have
    naturally occurring polio cases.
  • Launched the Field Epidemiology Training Program (FETP) Surveillance
    Training for Ebola Preparedness (STEP) in West African high-risk
    countries without Ebola to improve their ability to rapidly collect
    and analyze health data. FETP now reaches more than 60 countries.
  • Prevented 1.2 billion malaria cases and 6.2 million malaria deaths
    since 2001 through efforts of CDC and partners in the President’s
    Malaria Initiative, the Global Fund, and Roll Back Malaria.
CDC Global Rapid Response worker on location

A STEP Against Ebola: CDC Works to Prevent the Next Outbreak

As efforts progress to eliminate the largest Ebola epidemic in history, CDC is working to ensure West Africa has the ability to prevent future outbreaks as well. CDC launched the Field Epidemiology Training Program (FETP) Surveillance Training for Ebola Preparedness (STEP) in high-risk countries like Cote d’Ivoire, Guinea Bissau, Mali, and Senegal before these countries are affected.

FETP-STEP targets surveillance officers in high-risk districts who are often the first point of contact for hearing about people becoming sick with a disease, compiling data and reporting on who is affected, outbreak detection, and response. The training not only improves Ebola prevention, but the prevention of other infectious diseases as well.

STEP includes an interactive workshop with group exercises, three weeks of field work in the participants’ home districts, and another intensive workshop in which participants present their work. CDC will soon have nearly 200 public health workers trained in Ebola preparedness throughout West Africa. Trainees indicate the course has helped them better understand their role in collecting data and, most of all, has strengthened their ability to analyze and share health data that could make the difference in catching the next outbreak before it becomes an epidemic.

Dr. Eric Brenner, senior epidemiologist consultant, works through real-world disease monitoring exercises with FETP-STEP trainees in Cote d’Ivoire.

Dr. Eric Brenner, senior epidemiologist consultant, works through real-world disease monitoring exercises with FETP-STEP trainees in Cote d’Ivoire.

 

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