CDC 24-7 Fact of the Week

fact of the week

Fact of the Week: Winterstorm
Week of December 2, 2019

Are you prepared for a winter storm? Winter storms can bring cold temperatures, power failures, loss of communication services, and icy roads. To keep yourself and your loved ones safe, you should know how to prepare your home and your car before a winter storm hits.

2019
Holiday Turkey
Week of November 25, 2019

Never thaw your turkey by leaving it out on the counter. A thawing turkey must defrost at a safe temperature. When the turkey is left out at room temperature for more than 2 hours, its temperature becomes unsafe. Bacteria can grow rapidly in the “danger zone” between 40°F and 140°F. Visit our food safety page for more Thanksgiving safety tips.

Fact of the week antibiotic resistance
Week of November 11, 2019

USAAW is an annual observance that raises awareness of the threat of antibiotic resistance and the importance of appropriate antibiotic use. Use our partner toolkit to help raise awareness of the importance of appropriate antibiotic use.

Woman blowing her nose.
Week of November 4, 2019

Like everyone, people with diabetes get the flu and get sick sometimes, even when you try your best to prevent it. Being prepared and knowing what to do when you get sick is important. There are several things you can do now to prepare for sick days. Visit our page to learn more.

Don't let an eye infection be the scariest part of your Halloween
Week of October 28, 2019

Don’t let an eye infection be the scariest part of your Halloween. Using decorative lenses without a valid prescription can cause serious harm to your eyes—haunting you long after October 31st. Learn more about contact lense safety at our page

A pregnant woman speaking to a nurse about her pregnancy
Week of October 21, 2019

Are you pregnant? Getting a flu shot this month is a very important item to check off your list. Ask your healthcare professional about getting a flu shot to protect you and your baby.

family inside house watching television
Week of September 30, 2019

If you need to stay home during a hurricane, stay inside. Even if it looks calm, don’t go outside. Wait until you hear or see an official message that the hurricane is over. Sometimes, weather gets calm in the middle of a storm but then gets worse again quickly.

two people sneezing into hankerchief
Week of September 23, 2019

CDC recommends a yearly flu vaccine as the first and most important step in protecting against influenza and its potentially serious complications. Learn more at our flu prevention web page.

Flu season begins in late September. Use our Ready Wrigley preparedness books for kids to help children understand how to prepare for flu season and the importance of getting a flu shot.
Week of September 16, 2019

Flu season begins in late September. Use our Ready Wrigley preparedness books for kids to help children understand how to prepare for flu season and the importance of getting a flu shot.

Parents with children
Week of September 9, 2019

During and after a disaster, it is natural to experience different and strong emotions. Coping with these feelings and getting help when you need it will help you, your family, and your community recover from a disaster. Connect with family, friends, and others in your community. Take care of yourself and each other, and know when and how to seek help.

hurricane
Week of September 2, 2019

Hurricanes don’t only affect people living along the coast. They can still cause damage even if you live hundreds of miles from the shore. If you’re in an area where hurricanes are a risk, you need a plan.

Doctor talking to a patient.
Week of August 26, 2019

The #HowIRecommend video series features short, informative videos from clinicians like you. These videos explain the importance of vaccination, how to effectively address questions from parents about vaccine safety and effectiveness, and how clinicians routinely recommend same day vaccination to their patients.

close up of woman puting contact lens in eye
Week of August 19, 2019

Enjoy the comfort and benefits of contact lenses while lowering your chance of complications. Failure to wear, clean, and store your lenses as directed by your eye doctor raises the risk of developing serious infections.

pregnant woman speaking with health care professional
Week of August 12, 2019

Vaccines help protect you and your baby against serious diseases. You probably know that when you are pregnant, you share everything with your baby. That means when you get vaccines, you aren’t just protecting yourself—you are giving your baby some early protection too. CDC recommends you get a whooping cough and flu vaccine during each pregnancy to help protect yourself and your baby.

woman holding a baby
Week of August 5, 2019

Breastfeeding is an Investment in Health. Breastfeeding can help lower a mother’s risk of high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, ovarian cancer, and breast cancer.

blue human torso with red liver
Week of July 29, 2019

Hepatitis means inflammation of the liver, and is often caused by a virus. The most common types of viral hepatitis are hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C. Learn more about the ABCs of hepatitis.

Lightning storm
Week of July 22, 2019

Although the odds of being struck by lightning in a given year are less than 1 in 1,000,000, some factors can put you at greater risk. Learn more about lightning safety.

kids running and smiling
Week of July 15, 2019

To help ensure the health and safety of young athletes, CDC developed the HEADS UP Concussion in Youth Sports initiative to offer information about concussions to coaches, parents, and athletes involved in youth sports. The HEADS UP initiative provides important information on preventing, recognizing, and responding to a concussion.

Two workers are walking near construction site
Week of July 8, 2019

Working outside on a hot day? Use the NIOSH Heat Safety App to plan outdoor work activities based on how hot it feels throughout the day. Featuring real-time heat index and hourly forecasts, specific to your location, as well as occupational safety and health recommendations from OSHA and NIOSH.

The sun's ultraviolet (UV) rays can damage your skin in as little as 15 minutes. You can reduce your risk of skin damage and skin cancer by seeking shade under an umbrella, tree, or other shelter before you need relief from the sun. Your best bet to protect your skin is to use sunscreen or wear protective clothing when you're outside—even when you're in the shade. Learn more about sun safety.
Week of July 1, 2019

The sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays can damage your skin in as little as 15 minutes. You can reduce your risk of skin damage and skin cancer by seeking shade under an umbrella, tree, or other shelter before you need relief from the sun. Your best bet to protect your skin is to use sunscreen or wear protective clothing when you’re outside—even when you’re in the shade. Learn more about sun safety.

toy plane on top of passport on world map
Week of June 24, 2019

Infants 6-11 months old should get one dose of the MMR vaccine before international travel. All children 12 months and older should get two doses of MMR vaccine, at least 28 days apart.

Ebola virus was first discovered in 1976 near the Ebola River in what is now the Democratic Republic of Congo. Since then, the virus has been infecting people from time to time, leading to outbreaks in several African countries. Learn more about Ebola virus here
Week of June 17, 2019

Ebola virus was first discovered in 1976 near the Ebola River in what is now the Democratic Republic of Congo. Since then, the virus has been infecting people from time to time, leading to outbreaks in several African countries. Learn more about Ebola virus here.

lgbt students
Week of June 10, 2019

CDC is committed to protecting and improving the health and quality of life of all youth. Sexual minority youth or lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth are a part of every community, every race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic class, and live in all parts of the United States. Learn more about health risks of LGBT students here.

Stroke kills about 140,000 Americans each year—that's 1 out of every 20 deaths. Most strokes are preventable. Learn more about stroke, the signs and symptoms, and how to prevent stroke here.
Week of June 3, 2019

Stroke kills about 140,000 Americans each year—that’s 1 out of every 20 deaths. Most strokes are preventable. Learn more about stroke, the signs and symptoms, and how to prevent stroke here.

Grilling Safety
Week of May 27, 2019

Food poisoning peaks in the summer months when warmer temperatures cause foodborne germs to flourish. Follow these steps for a safe and enjoyable grilling season.

Swimming and other water-related activities are excellent ways to get the physical activity and health benefits needed for a healthy life. However, they are not risk-free. Learn more at CDC's Healthy Swimming website.
Week of May 20, 2019

Swimming and other water-related activities are excellent ways to get the physical activity and health benefits needed for a healthy life. However, they are not risk-free. Learn more at CDC’s Healthy Swimming website.

a family with dog sitting in front of a lake
Week of May 13, 2019

Studies have shown that the bond between people and their pets can increase fitness, lower stress, and bring happiness to their owners. Learn more about the health benefits of pet ownership at our “Healthy Pets, Healthy People” feature.

woman smiling and talking to friends
Week of May 6, 2019

More than 50% of Americans will be diagnosed with a mental illness or disorder at some point in their lifetime. See our page for more information and resources about mental health.

man looking at computer
Week of April 26, 2019

In the United States, the most common types of viral hepatitis are hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C. While each can produce similar symptoms, each hepatitis virus has different routes of transmission and has different populations that are commonly affected. Are you at risk? Take our 5 minute risk assessment tool and get a personalized report here.

Vaccination is a highly effective, easy way to keep your family healthy. Print our easy vaccine guide and bring it to your next appointment, along with any questions you'd like to discuss.
Week of April 22, 2019

Vaccination is a highly effective, easy way to keep your family healthy. Print our easy vaccine guide and bring it to your next appointment, along with any questions you’d like to discuss.

April 18th is National Transgender HIV/AIDS Awareness Day. Click here to learn more about the specific HIV/AIDS prevention challenges for transgender people and what CDC is doing to help.
Week of April 15, 2019

April 18th is National Transgender HIV/AIDS Awareness Day. Click here to learn more about the specific HIV/AIDS prevention challenges for transgender people and what CDC is doing to help.

road blocked by flooding
Week of April 8, 2019

Floods, big or small, can have devastating effects on your home and your family. Take steps to reduce the harm caused by flooding.

baby in stroller smiling at mom
Week of April 1, 2019

By the age of 2 months, a baby should begin to smile at people. Learn more about important developmental milestones for children at our Learn the Signs. Act Early. website.

man coughing
Week of March 25, 2019

Symptoms of tuberculosis (TB) can include a bad cough that lasts three weeks or longer, or pain in the chest. Learn more about TB here.

father feeding his son
Week of March 18, 2019

Good nutrition starts early! By the time your child is 7 or 8 months old, he or she can eat a variety of foods from different food groups.

Girl at airport on cell phone
Week of March 11, 2019

Blood clots, also called deep vein thrombosis (DVT), can be a serious risk for some long-distance travelers. The longer you are immobile, the greater your risk of developing a blood clot.

Pregnant woman with her hands on her belly
Week of March 4, 2019

Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) is one of many causes of birth defects that CDC is working to better understand. CMV can cause long-term problems, such as hearing loss, developmental and motor delays, vision loss, an abnormally small head, and seizures. Find out more about CMV.

In 2018, more than 1 in 4 high school students and about 1 in 14 middle school students used tobacco product in the past 30 days. Read our latest Vital Signs,
Week of February 25, 2019

In 2018, more than 1 in 4 high school students and about 1 in 14 middle school students used tobacco product in the past 30 days. Read our latest Vital Signs, “Tobacco Use By Youth is Rising.”

1 in 4 new prescriptions for blood pressure medications are never filled. Health care professionals can help patients take blood pressure medicines as directed with our Blood Pressure Communications Kit.
Week of February 11, 2019

1 in 4 new prescriptions for blood pressure medications are never filled. Health care professionals can help patients take blood pressure medicines as directed with our Blood Pressure Communications Kit.

girl on bench listening to music
Week of February 4, 2019

Quitting smoking improves your health and reduces your risk of heart disease, cancer, lung disease, and other smoking-related illnesses. Download CDC’s free QuitGuide mobile app to start your quit plan now.

About 3 million Americans have glaucoma. Half of people with glaucoma don't know they have it. Learn more glaucoma facts here, and know your risks.
Week of January 28, 2019

About 3 million Americans have glaucoma. Half of people with glaucoma don’t know they have it. Learn more glaucoma facts here, and know your risks.

If stranded while driving in winter weather, tie a brightly colored cloth to the car antenna as a signal to rescuers. In adults, drowsiness is a sign of hypothermia. Learn more facts about winter safety on our Winter Weather Frequently Asked Questions page.
Week of January 22, 2019

If stranded while driving in winter weather, you should tie a brightly colored cloth to the car antenna as a signal to rescuers. In adults, drowsiness is a sign of hypothermia. Learn more facts about winter safety on our Winter Weather Frequently Asked Questions page.

woman working with petridish sample
Week of January 11, 2019

CDC is a leader in the fight against antibiotic resistance. Antibiotic resistance has the potential to impact all Americans at every stage of life. Find out what we are doing to help combat and slow this global threat.

CDC urges all women of reproductive age to take 400 micrograms (mcg) of folic acid each day. Visit our page for free resources and learn more about the importance of folic acid.
Week of January 7, 2019

CDC urges all women of reproductive age to take 400 micrograms (mcg) of folic acid each day. Visit our page for free resources and learn more about the importance of folic acid.

Page last reviewed: December 2, 2019