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CDC 24-7 Fact of the Week Archives

Fact of the Week - Archives

CDC Fact of the Week

snow man cartoon
Week of December 25, 2017

This song (sung to the tune of Deck the Halls) describes actions you can take to protect yourself and others from the flu. Sing along! And learn more about flu.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Man with hand against forehead
Week of December 18, 2017

This time of year can be stressful. Find out how to manage stress by following CDC’s tips for self-care.

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CDC Fact of the Week

A family posing beside a snowman
Week of December 11, 2017

Brighten the holidays by making your health and safety a priority. Take steps to keep you and your loved ones safe and healthy—and ready to enjoy the holidays.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Strategic National Stockpile
Week of December 4, 2017

When the Department of Health and Human Services calls the Strategic National Stockpile answers. Learn how Federal Medical Stations help people during a public health emergency.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Pregnant woman holding broken cigarette
Week of November 27, 2017

Smoking during pregnancy can cause babies to be born too small or too early (preterm birth), certain birth defects, and stillbirth. Quitting smoking can be hard, but it is one of the best ways a woman can protect herself and her developing baby.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Snowy highway
Week of November 20, 2017

In the United States, motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of death for people aged 1‒54. Learn to keep yourself and others safe on the road over the holidays.

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CDC Fact of the Week

a teen girl using her inhaler
Week of November 13, 2017

Each year in the United States, about 50,000 people die from pneumonia. Learn how to lower your risk.

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CDC Fact of the Week

a pill bottle
Week of November 6, 2017

More than 183,000 people have died in the United States from overdoses related to prescription opioids from 1999–2015.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Girl child drinking from water fountain
Week of October 30, 2017

Children are more vulnerable to environmental exposures from before they are born through early childhood. Learn how to protect your child from exposure to health hazards in the environment.

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CDC Fact of the Week

infographic regarding preparations for wildfires
Week of October 23, 2017

More and more people make their homes in areas that are prone to wildfires. You can take steps to be ready for a wildfire and prepare your home and landscaping to reduce your risk.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Doctor and patient looking at clipboard
Week of October 16, 2017

Having an up-to-date vaccination record is important. This record tells you and your doctor if you’re protected against vaccine-preventable diseases. Use these tools to keep track of your immunizations.

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CDC Fact of the Week

I Am CDC
Week of October 10, 2017

Overweight and obesity are associated with at least 13 different types of cancer. These cancers make up 40 percent of all cancers diagnosed. Learn more.

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CDC Fact of the Week

I Am CDC
Week of October 2, 2017

The “I Am CDC” videos feature CDC staff who work 24/7 to defend America from health threats. Learn more.

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CDC Fact of the Week

CDC Keeping You Safe 24/7
Week of September 25, 2017

In uncertain times, safeguarding America’s health and security is more important than ever. Whether the threat is a disease outbreak, chronic condition, environmental hazard, natural disaster or deliberate attack, CDC works 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to keep Americans safe – in the US and around the world. Learn more.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Get Ahead of Sepsis
Week of September 19, 2017

Infections can put you and your family at risk for a life-threatening condition called sepsis. Learn more.

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CDC Fact of the Week

flooded street
Week of September 11, 2017

Get tips to keep you and family safe after a hurricane.

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CDC Fact of the Week

flooded street
Week of September 4, 2017

Take these important steps to protect yourself, your family and your home during a flood.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Did you know that Zika can be spread through sex? Take steps to protect yourself and your partner.
Week of August 28, 2017

Did you know that Zika can be spread through sex? Take steps to protect yourself and your partner.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Week of August 21, 2017

This school year, learn actions you can take to keep kids safe and healthy in and away from school.

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CDC Fact of the Week

A mother and toddler on their lawn
Week of August 14, 2017

EPA-registered insect repellents are proven safe and effective for everyone, including children over 2 months old and pregnant and breastfeeding women. Make sure to follow the directions on the label when applying.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Man in an electric wheelchair strolling in a park with a friend
Week of August 7, 2017

Creating opportunities for healthy, active living by people of all abilities is a priority as we plan our communities. Learn more.

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CDC Fact of the Week

5 middle aged people
Week of July 31, 2017

Almost 1 out of 3 people in the United States will develop shingles during their lifetime. Your risk of shingles increases as you get older. Learn more.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Harmful algal bloom in a lake
Week of July 24, 2017

Harmful algal blooms can produce toxins that are dangerous to people, animals, and the environment. Learn what harmful algal blooms are, how you and your pets can avoid them, and what CDC is doing to protect the public’s health.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Control Mosquitoes
Week of July 17, 2017

Everyone can do their part to help control mosquitoes. Learn how you can help.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Mother and son enjoying swimming pool
Week of July 10, 2017

Stay healthy and avoid recreational water illnesses (RWIs) when you swim in pools, water playgrounds, or other treated water venues, or use the hot tub/spa, by following a few simple steps.

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CDC Fact of the Week

A town in the foreground and lightning striking in the distance
Week of July 3, 2017

Is that thunder you hear? Was that a lightning flash? Learn how to protect yourself and your loved ones during a thunderstorm.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Jars with prpared food items.
Week of June 26, 2017

Home canning is an excellent way to preserve garden produce and share it with family and friends. But it can be risky—or even deadly—if not done correctly and safely.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Family of three on a beach
Week of June 19, 2017

Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States. Most cases of melanoma, the deadliest kind of skin cancer, are caused by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays. To lower your skin cancer risk, protect your skin from the sun and avoid indoor tanning.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Older couple
Week of June 12, 2017

Cancer survivors often face physical, mental, or financial problems. Learn how you can  help

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CDC Fact of the Week

Week of June 5, 2017

CDC reminds you to make sure you are up to date on all recommended vaccinations before traveling abroad

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CDC Fact of the Week

Woman clutching headphones and wincing
Week of May 29, 2017

May is “Better Hearing and Speech Month,” a time to raise awareness about what you need to do to protect your hearing. Loud noises can cause permanent hearing loss. And once it’s gone, you can’t get it back. Learn more.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Mosquito
Week of May 22, 2017

Ever wonder how CDC scientists merge old-fashioned detective work with high-tech science to crack the cases of mystery diseases? Get the Story! Visit the David J. Sencer CDC Museum at CDC Headquarters. The museum is free and open to the public so we would like to see you soon.

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CDC Fact of the Week

EMT and ambulance
Week of May 15, 2017

When a stroke happens, every second counts. The best chance for a full recovery from stroke comes from recognizing stroke symptoms, calling 9-1-1, and getting treatment as quickly as possible. For National Stroke Awareness Month, learn the symptoms of stroke and why calling 9-1-1 can help you or a loved one survive a stroke.

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City covered in smog
Week of May 1, 2017

Find out how air quality affects your health and use the Air Quality Index to help plan your day.

CDC Fact of the Week

Two women
Week of April 24, 2017

About 1 out of 10 people may have a seizure in his or her lifetime. That means seizures are common, and one day you might need to help someone during or after a seizure. Learn more from CDC.  

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CDC Fact of the Week

group of children
Week of April 19, 2017

During National Child Abuse Prevention Month, learn about CDC’s work to better understand the problem of child abuse and neglect and to prevent it before it begins.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Tornado
Week of April 10, 2017

Spring weather can be unpredictable. Reduce injury risk and plan ahead.  

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CDC Fact of the Week

Chickens
Week of April 3, 2017

Spring brings baby chicks. CDC reminds you that live poultry, such as chickens, ducks, geese, and turkeys, often carry germs such as Salmonella. After you touch a bird, or anything in the area where birds live and roam, wash your hands so you don’t get sick!  

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CDC Fact of the Week

conjunctivitis
Week of March 27, 2017

Pink eye—or conjunctivitis—is common and spreads easily. It sometimes needs medical treatment, depending on the cause. CDC helps you to know the symptoms, when to seek treatment, and how to help prevent it

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CDC Fact of the Week

Stop the clot. Spread the word.
Week of March 13, 2017

Read about CDC’s Stop the Clot campaign and learn how to protect yourself from blood clots.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Dairy products
Week of March 6, 2017

Raw milk can contain harmful germs, such as bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can make you very sick or possibly kill you. If you’re thinking about drinking raw milk because you believe it has health benefits, consider other options.

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CDC Fact of the Week

a girl getting a dental exam
Week of February 27, 2017

February is Children’s Dental Health Month. Learn how most cavities in children can be prevented, and how CDC brings this program to children at highest risk for decay.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Week of February 21, 2017

This February celebrate African American History Month. Learn about how heart disease, cancer, and stroke impact African Americans and how to improve your health.

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CDC Fact of the Week

a girl getting a dental exam
Week of February 13, 2017

February is Children’s Dental Health Month. Learn how most cavities in children can be prevented, and how CDC brings this program to children at highest risk for decay.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Woman leaning on exercise ball
Week of February 6, 2017

February is American Heart Month. Learn about heart disease and women and what you can do to keep a healthy heart

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CDC Fact of the Week

Students studying together
Week of January 30, 2017

CDC’s Office of Minority Health and Health Equity (OMHHE) supports internship opportunities for qualified undergraduate and graduate students to gain meaningful experiences in public health settings. Learn about programs that provide valuable exposure to a wide range of public health opportunities.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Zika and pregnancy
Week of January 23, 2017

CDC marks one year of the Zika response. Learn more about CDC’s work.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Three people
Week of January 17, 2017

CDC reminds you that adults need vaccines too. There are many important reasons to get vaccinated Learn more.

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CDC Fact of the Week

House and yard covered in snow
Week of January 9, 2017

CDC has tips to prepare you, your home and your car for winter emergencies. Read more.

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CDC Fact of the Week

CDC worked around the clock to keep Americans safe by stopping disease at home and around the world in 2016.
Week of January 2, 2017

Learn about CDC’s 2016 work towards keeping Americans safe by stopping disease at home and around the world. See CDC year in review.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Family health history
Week of December 26, 2016

This holiday season, ask family about their health, share with your doctor and take steps to reduce disease. Act on your family’s health history.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Family around a snowman
Week of December 19, 2016

CDC offers 12 ways for you and your loved ones to stay safe and healthy this holiday season.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Baby chewing on toy
Week of December 12, 2016

CDC reminds you to protect children from potential lead hazards in some holiday toys and toy jewelry. Check out these tips

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CDC Fact of the Week

VERB Logo
Week of December 5, 2016

In 2002, Congress provided resources for CDC to launch a national, multicultural, social marketing campaign to respond to the growing problem of childhood obesity. The campaign, VERB™ It’s what you do, encouraged tweens, ages 9-13, to be more physically active. 

CDC Fact of the Week

Graphic - Zika Action Plan summit
Week of November 28, 2016

In 2016 CDC activated its Emergency Operations Center to respond to the Zika Virus outbreak. CDC hosted the Zika Action Plan Summit to provide state and local senior officials with information and tools needed to improve Zika preparedness and response.

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CDC Fact of the Week

A room full of people sitting behind computers
Week of November 21, 2016

In 2014 CDC activated its Emergency Operations Center to respond to the largest Ebola outbreak in history affecting multiple countries in West Africa. CDC helped coordinate the response at the national level, providing health education and assisting with database management. CDC trained teams of people to do contact tracing, to help find everyone who came in direct contact with a sick Ebola patients.

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CDC Fact of the Week

A Haitian mother and child
Week of November 13, 2016

In 2010, in the aftermath of the 7.0 magnitude earthquake in Haiti, CDC response effort helps prevent 7,000 deaths from cholera.

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CDC Fact of the Week

a group of 4 people Week of November 7, 2016

In 2009 CDC identifies the novel H1N1 influenza virus. The H1N1 flu pandemic dominates CDC activity for the year, and demonstrates CDC’s unique ability to assess and explain risk.

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CDC Fact of the Week

People wearing PPEs Week of October 31, 2016

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) is first discovered in Asia in 2003. CDC responds by providing guidance for surveillance, clinical and laboratory evaluation, and reporting. 

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CDC Fact of the Week

X-ray Week of October 24, 2016

In 2001 CDC was involved with the World Trade Center and bioterrorist anthrax attacks and response. See more in the EID – Investigation of Bioterrorism-Related Anthrax, United States, 2001: Epidemiologic Findings.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Building Week of October 17, 2016

In 1999 CDC launched National Pharmaceutical Stockpile (now the ), a stockpile of drugs, vaccines, and other medical products and supplies, to provide for the emergency health security of the US and its territories.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Two girls Week of October 10, 2016

In 1994 the Vaccines for Children Program was established. It’s a federally funded program that provides vaccines at no cost to children who might not otherwise be vaccinated because of inability to pay. Learn more here

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CDC Fact of the Week

CDC Building Week of October 3, 2016

In 1992, the agency is renamed Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to reflect a broader role and vision. The agency is asked by Congress to continue using the initials “CDC.”

CDC Fact of the Week

Group of school children Week of September 19, 2016

In 1988 CDC establishes the Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion to target chronic diseases such as heart disease, cancer, and diabetes

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CDC Fact of the Week

Act against AIDS Week of September 12, 2016

In 1981 MMWR (Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report) publishes a report of five cases of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) among previously healthy young men in Los Angeles. Local clinicians and the Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) officer stationed at the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health prepares the report and submits it to MMWR. CDC develops an investigative team to identify risk factors and to develop a case definition for national surveillance (First AIDS cases reported).

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CDC Fact of the Week

Road to Zero Week of August 29, 2016

In 1976 CDC sends disease detectives to investigate two large outbreaks of an unknown deadly hemorrhagic fever in Zaire and Sudan, a disease later known as Ebola. Nearly 4 decades later Ebola was making news around the world. Since March 2014, West Africa has experienced the largest outbreak of Ebola in history. CDC and partners have worked to contain this epidemic at its source. Learn more.  

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CDC Fact of the Week

Week of August 22, 2016

In 1970 the National Communicable Disease Center (NCDC) is renamed Center for Disease Control (CDC). In 1979 CDC assumes lead responsibility in the US Public Health Service for environmental emergency response

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CDC Fact of the Week

Graphic: Woman holding child Week of August 15, 2016

In 1963 the Immunization Assistance Grant Program is established and CDC administers the Vaccination Assistance Act through project grants. The program is designed to raise and maintain high levels of immunization against; poliomyelitis, diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Week of August 8, 2016

In 1960, the Tuberculosis Program transfers from the US Public Health Service to CDC. The Tuberculosis laboratory is already in Atlanta at Lawson General Hospital, having moved there several years earlier. 

In the early 20th century, TB was the leading cause of death in the United States. From that point TB cases steadily declined until the 1980s and early 1990s when a TB resurgence occurred with over 25,000 TB cases being reported per year. The resurgence was associated with the emergence of the HIV epidemic, increased immigration from countries with high TB rates, and a deterioration of TB control programs in many jurisdictions. Following a major investment in TB control activities at all levels of government, TB cases began to decline again. In 2014, the reported number of US TB cases was 9,421, with a case rate of 3.0 cases per 100,000 population (30 per million population). Since the 1992 TB resurgence peak in the United States, the number of TB cases reported annually has decreased by 65 percent. 

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CDC Fact of the Week

Week of August 1, 2016

In 1957, the Asian flu pandemic emerged in Hong Kong with millions of cases and thousands of deaths. CDC quickly set up an influenza surveillance unit, a joint operation of the Epidemiology and Laboratory Branches.  

In January 2016, an outbreak of HPAI (H7N8) virus was reported in a commercial turkey flock in Dubois County, Indiana. LPAI (H7N8) was subsequently detected in eight nearby turkey flocks. No transmission of HPAI (H7N8) or LPAI (H7N8) virus to humans was reported. More information is available here.

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CDC Fact of the Week

a medic administering polio vaccine drops to a child Week of July 25, 2016

In 1955 during the National Polio Immunization Program, EIS officers trace 260 polio cases to improper vaccine production methods. As a result, CDC establishes the Polio Surveillance Program.

In 1988, the World Health Assembly adopted a resolution for the worldwide eradication of polio. It marked the launch of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI), spearheaded by national governments, CDC, Rotary International, WHO, and UNICEF, with substantial support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

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CDC Fact of the Week

In 1948 CDC conducts the first training courses in Laboratory Diagnosis of Tuberculosis
Week of July 11, 2016

In 1948 CDC conducts the first training courses in Laboratory Diagnosis of Tuberculosis and Mycotic Diseases. Today Tuberculosis (TB) is still one of the world’s deadliest diseases: 

One third of the world’s population is infected with TB.

In 2014, 9.6 million people around the world became sick with TB disease. There were 1.5 million TB-related deaths worldwide.

TB is a leading killer of people who are HIV infected.

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CDC Fact of the Week

In 1948 CDC conducts the first training courses in Laboratory Diagnosis of Tuberculosis
Week of July 11, 2016

In 1948 CDC conducts the first training courses in Laboratory Diagnosis of Tuberculosis and Mycotic Diseases. Today Tuberculosis (TB) is still one of the world’s deadliest diseases: 

One third of the world’s population is infected with TB.

In 2014, 9.6 million people around the world became sick with TB disease. There were 1.5 million TB-related deaths worldwide.

TB is a leading killer of people who are HIV infected.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Week of July 4, 2016

In 1949 CDC offered disaster aid in response to multiple chemical explosions in Texas City, TX. Afterwards, CDC was designated as the official response agency for future epidemics and disasters. Today The Emergency Operations Center (EOC) brings together scientists from across CDC to analyze, validate, and efficiently exchange information during a public health emergency and connect with emergency response partners. When activated for a response, the EOC can accommodate up to 230 personnel per 8-hour shift to handle situations ranging from local interests to worldwide incidents. 

The EOC coordinates the deployment of CDC staff and the procurement and management of all equipment and supplies that CDC responders may need during their deployment. 

In addition, the EOC has the ability to rapidly transport life-supporting medications, samples and specimens, and personnel anywhere in the world around the clock within two hours of notification for domestic missions and six hours for international missions. 

Since its inception in September 2001, the EOC has responded to more than 50 public health threats, including hurricanes, food borne disease outbreaks, the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic, and the Haiti cholera outbreak. In addition to emergencies, the EOC may also be activated for planned events (e.g., presidential inaugurations and Olympics taking place in the US) to monitor for incidents that may affect the public’s health. See comprehensive list of public health responses supported by the EOC since 2001.

CDC Fact of the Week

Week of June 27, 2016

CDC celebrates its 70th anniversary July 1. To mark this milestone, our Facts of the Week for the rest of the  year will reflect various public health milestones, providing a look at then and now. 

July 1, 1946 Malaria Control in War Areas, a program within the US Public Health Service, transitions into the Communicable Disease Center (CDC) on July 1. By 1951 Malaria is considered eliminated from the US. Flash forward to January 22, 2016. CDC’s Emergency Operations Center (EOC) was activated for Zika virus disease on January 22, 2016, and moved to a level 1 activation—the highest level—on February 8, 2016. 

CDC Fact of the Week

Grocery store receipt
Week of June 20, 2016

Each year, about 1 in 6 Americans (or 48 million people) get sick from a foodborne illness. CDC offers ways you can help protect others from getting sick.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Week of June 13, 2016

Cancer survivors are living longer after their diagnosis, but at least one-third of the more than 14 million survivors in the United States face physical, mental, social, job, or financial problems related to their cancer experience. CDC works with community partners to bring attention to these and other challenges faced by cancer survivors and provide education on ways to improve survivors’ health and quality of life.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Week of June 6, 2016

If you live in coastal areas at risk, CDC encourages you to begin preparing yourself for hurricane season. The Atlantic hurricane season is June 1 through November 30 each year. Please follow these important hurricane preparedness tips from CDC.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Week of May 31, 2016

Pools, waterparks, hot tubs/spas, and water playgrounds are great places to have fun, be active, or just relax. Having fun while you are in the water this summer means knowing how to stay healthy and safe! Learn more from CDC.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Week of May 24, 2016

CDC provides important steps to take before, during, and after a flood.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Woman framing eyes with fingers Week of May 16, 2016

May is Healthy Vision Month. CDC reminds you eye diseases are common and can go unnoticed for a long time—some have no symptoms. CDC offers tips for vision health.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Clean Hands Count Week of May 9, 2016

CDC reminds you clean hands can protect you from serious infections while you are a patient in a healthcare facility. Most germs that cause serious infections in healthcare are spread by people’s actions. Hand hygiene is a great way to prevent infections.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Group of men and women Week of May 2, 2016

About 53 million US adults have arthritis. However, the number of men and women with arthritis is growing and expected to reach more than 78 million in 2040, according to a new CDC study. Learn what to do so you feel your best with arthritis.  

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CDC Fact of the Week

Minority Health Week of April 25, 2016

April is National Minority Health Month. The theme for 2016 is “Accelerating Health Equity for the Nation.” Learn what CDC is doing and help raise awareness of the health disparities that affect minorities.  

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CDC Fact of the Week

Handwashing Week of April 18, 2016

Handwashing is one of the best ways to protect yourself and your family from getting sick. CDC has tips on how and when to wash your hands to protect yourself and others.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Mother and daughter reading book Week of April 11, 2016

High-quality early intervention services can change a child’s developmental path and improve outcomes for children, families, and communities. CDC advises if you’re concerned about your child’s development, don’t wait. You know your child best. Use a developmental milestones checklist, talk with your child’s doctor, and call your local early intervention program.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Hands joined in a circle Week of April 4, 2016

April 4-10, 2016 is National Public Health Week. Read more about this year’s public health themes and how CDC is working towards the mission of Healthiest Nation 2030.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Doctor comforting patient Week of March 28, 2016

March is Deep Vein Thrombosis Awareness Month. CDC asks, are you at risk? Learn the signs and symptoms.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Group of people on the beach Week of March 21, 2016

Bitten by the travel bug for spring break this year? Follow these CDC tips to reduce your risk of illness or injury abroad.  

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CDC Fact of the Week

Nurse showing chart to woman Week of March 14, 2016

Turn to CDC for information on kidney health. Your kidneys aren’t very large—each is just the size of a computer mouse—but they’re hard-working. How well are your kidneys working?

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CDC Fact of the Week

crowd of people Week of March 7, 2016

Reducing health disparities brings us closer to reaching health equity. Learn about health equity and what CDC is doing to reduce health disparities.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Woman sleeping Week of February 29, 2016

35 percent of US adults do not get enough sleep, reports CDC. Not getting enough sleep continues to be a problem in the US. 

Are you one of those adults? Learn more about your risk and how many adults don’t get enough sleep.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Woman with exercise ball Week of February 22, 2016

February is American Heart Month. Learn about heart disease in women and what you can do to keep a healthy heart.

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CDC Fact of the Week

bacteria Week of February 15, 2016

CDC has 17,000 staff in more than 60 countries. Learn what we are doing.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Week of February 8, 2016

CDC reminds you lead poisoning can be prevented. The key is to keep children from coming in contact with lead. If children are lead poisoned they must be treated. Learn how to prevent children’s exposure to lead.   

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CDC Fact of the Week

mosquito Week of February 1, 2016

Learn more about Zika virus. CDC has information on symptoms and how the virus spreads.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Smiling girl Week of January 25, 2016

Did you know that birth defects affect one in every 33 babies born in the United States? That means about one child in every school classroom might be affected. Those are not just numbers—they represent real babies and families. CDC provides these family stories to learn more about birth defects and how these conditions can impact lives.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Tracking Network Week of January 18, 2016

CDC’s Tracking Network is an excellent data source for environmental hazards, exposures, and health conditions that can be a valuable asset to the health impact assessment process. Learn more

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CDC Fact of the Week

Week of January 11, 2016

Make 2016 your healthiest year yet! CDC suggests ways to boost your health and well-being, and be an inspiration!  

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CDC Fact of the Week

Family in bed blowing their noses
Week of January 4, 2016

CDC reminds you to protect yourself and others from the common cold. Here are some tips.

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CDC Fact of the Week

HPV Vaccine
Week of December 28, 2015

Many people think the HPV vaccine only protects girls, but this vaccine protects boys against certain HPV-related cancers, too! See the guidance from CDC. 

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CDC Fact of the Week

Healthy Tips
Week of December 21, 2015

CDC suggests 12 ways to have a healthy holiday season. 

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CDC Fact of the Week

Lead Hazards
Week of December 14, 2015

Protect children from potential lead hazards in some holiday toys and toy jewelry. See tips from CDC.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Man working outside with a snow shovel
Week of December 7, 2015

CDC reminds you, when workers do jobs in the cold, there are many risks. Some cold weather dangers are obvious, but others are harder to see. When you must work in the cold, always be prepared and be aware.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Week of November 30, 2015

Gather and Share Your Family Health History  

CDC encourages you to know your family health history. If you are concerned about a disease running in your family, collect your family health history and talk to your doctor at your next visit. A doctor can evaluate all of the factors, including family health history, that may affect your risk of diseases and can recommend ways to reduce that risk. Learn more.  

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CDC Fact of the Week

Week of November 23, 2015

CDC reminds you, if you’re pregnant, a flu shot is your best protection against serious flu illness. A flu shot can protect pregnant women, their unborn babies, and even the baby after birth.  

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CDC Fact of the Week

National Epilepsy Awareness Month
Week of November 16, 2015

November is National Epilepsy Awareness Month . Because anyone can have a seizure, CDC encourages you to recognize seizure symptoms and to know how to help.

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CDC Fact of the Week

living with diabates
Week of November 9, 2015

November is National Diabetes Month and CDC urges you to take charge of your type 1 or type 2 diabetes for a longer, healthier life. Get more information here.  

CDC Fact of the Week

carbon monoxide poisoning
Week of November 2, 2015

CDC reminds you to check the batteries in your carbon monoxide (CO) detector. If you don’t have a battery-powered or battery back-up CO alarm, now is a great time to buy one. At least 430 people die each year in the United States from unintentional, non-fire related CO poisoning.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Bullying Prevention
Week of October 26, 2015

October is National Bullying Prevention Awareness Month, which provides a perfect opportunity for schools, communities, and states to talk about the best ways to prevent bullying. CDC’s Division of Violence Prevention recognizes efforts to improve the school environment and to prevent bullying nationwide. We invite you to learn about bullying and what you can do to prevent it.  

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CDC Fact of the Week

Health IQ
Week of October 19, 2015

CDC challenges you to test your Health IQ. Do you know the minimum SPF needed to protect yourself from the sun’s harmful rays? Or how many seconds you should wash your hands to kill germs? Test your Health IQ to see how your health skills stack up.  

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CDC Fact of the Week

Week of October 13, 2015

Children’s rapid development during the fetal period through early childhood makes them more vulnerable to environmental exposure. Learn more from CDC

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CDC Fact of the Week

Hispanic Health Focus - Group of people
Week of October 5, 2015

During National Hispanic Heritage Month, September 15 through October 15, we celebrate the culture of US residents who trace their roots to Spain, Mexico, and the Spanish-speaking nations of Central America, South America, and the Caribbean. While heritage includes the great traditions of family, respect for others, and festivities, it also includes the challenge of hereditary health conditions. CDC suggests you can celebrate by taking care of your health to prevent type 2 diabetes.

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CDC Fact of the Week

World Alzheimer's Month
Week of September 28, 2015

World Alzheimer’s Month 2015 focuses on learning to spot the signs of dementia and supporting loved ones who are living with dementia. Get the facts about Alzheimer’s disease from CDC. 

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CDC Fact of the Week

Week of September 21, 2015

September Is Infant Mortality Awareness Month. CDC has information to help you learn more about infant mortality risk factors and take action to reduce the risk. 

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CDC Fact of the Week

family sitting with infant
Week of September 14, 2015

September is National Preparedness Month, a great time to think about how prepared you are for an emergency. CDC has tips for you.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Week of August 31, 2015

School is back in session. As you stock up on pencils, take first-day pictures, and adjust to new bus schedules, CDC offers a few quick steps you can take to keep your child safer during an emergency.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Group of young adults Week of August 24, 2015

Going to college is an exciting time in a young person’s life. CDC offers 6 tips for college health and safety

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CDC Fact of the Week

CDC Health Information for International Travel Week of August 17, 2015
Do you have the latest travel health recommendations? Use the new CDC Health Information for International Travel 2016  (the Yellow Book) for your pre-travel health questions. 

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CDC Fact of the Week

Group of children Week of August 10, 2015

School-age children, from preschoolers to college students, need vaccines. CDC has online resources and tools to help parents and doctors make sure all kids are up to date on recommended vaccines and protected from serious diseases.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Sun Protection Week of August 3, 2015

How can you protect your family from the sun? CDC has tips.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Week of July 27, 2015

July 26 th  marked the 25 th  anniversary of the landmark Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), a civil rights law that strengthens the inclusion of people with disabilities at work, school, or other community settings. Learn what CDC is doing to include people with disabilities in public health research and health promotion activities.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Week of July 20, 2015

Eat More Fruits and Vegetables. Fewer than 1 in 5 adults are consuming enough fruit and vegetables in every state in the union. 

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CDC Fact of the Week

Immunization Schedules Week of July 13, 2015

Immunization Schedules. The US recommended immunization schedules for children and adults are regularly reviewed and updated based on the most current data.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Cancer Survivors Week of July 6, 2015

While cancer survivors are living longer after their diagnosis, at least one-third of the more than 14 million survivors in the United States face physical, mental, social, job, or financial problems related to their cancer experience. CDC works with community partners to bring attention to these and other challenges faced by cancer survivors and provide education on ways to improve survivors’ health and quality of life.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Heathy Swimming Week of June 29, 2015

Pools, waterparks, hot tubs/spas, and splash pad are great places to have fun, be active, or just relax. CDC has tips on ways to stay healthy and safe while enjoying the water!

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CDC Fact of the Week

Elder abuse is a significant public health problem
Week of June 22, 2015

Elder abuse is a significant public health problem. Each year, hundreds of thousands of adults over the age of 60 are abused, neglected, or financially exploited. CDC works to prevent violence before it occurs. Learn more about elder abuse prevention. 

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CDC Fact of the Week

Hurricane readiness
Week of June 15, 2015

If you live in coastal areas at risk, CDC encourages you to begin preparing yourself for hurricane season. The Atlantic hurricane season is June 1 through November 30 each year. Please follow these important hurricane readiness tips from CDC.

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CDC Fact of the Week

CDC Lab Worker
Week of June 8, 2015

CDC works 24/7 to protect America from health, safety and security threats, both foreign and in the US Whether diseases start at home or abroad, are chronic or acute, curable or preventable, human error or deliberate attack. Learn more about CDC's mission, role and pledge.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Lightining
Week of June 1, 2015

Spring weather can be unpredictable. CDC reminds you when severe weather hits unexpectedly, the risk of injury and death increases, so planning ahead makes sense. Prepare for storms, floods, and tornadoes as if you know in advance they are coming, because in the spring, they very likely will.

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CDC Fact of the Week

National Fitness and Sports Month
Week of May 26, 2015

May is National Fitness and Sports Month. CDC recommends finding and creating opportunities to add more physical activity into your daily routine and encourage family and friends to do the same.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Week of May 18, 2015

The CDC/ATSDR National ALS Registry contributes to a better understanding of ALS and helps create a better future for the next generation of persons living with ALS. Read the latest and learn more about ALS and the ALS Registry.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Home canned food
Week of May 11, 2015

Home canning is an excellent way to preserve garden produce and share it with family and friends, but it can be risky or even deadly if not done correctly and safely. It's almost summer, and home gardeners will soon start to harvest the delicious produce they've been growing this year. See CDC's tips to protect yourself, your family, and others when you share your home-canned goodies.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Photo: Hen
Week of May 4, 2015

Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5 infections have been reported in US domestic poultry (backyard and commercial flocks), captive wild birds, and wild birds. CDC reports no human infections with these viruses have been detected at this time, however similar viruses have infected people in other countries and caused serious illness and death in some cases.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Glass of beer on bar
Week of April 27, 2015

CDC reminds you that April is Alcohol Awareness Month. By not drinking too much, you can reduce the risk of short- and long-term health risks.

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CDC Fact of the Week

e-cigarette
Week of April 20, 2015

Current e-cigarette use among middle and high school students tripled from 2013 to 2014, according to data published by CDC and the FDA. This is the first time since the survey started collecting data on e-cigarettes in 2011 that current e-cigarette use has surpassed current use of every other tobacco product overall, including conventional cigarettes.

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CDC Fact of the Week

listeriosis outbreak
Week of April 13, 2015

CDC recommends that consumers do not eat any Blue Bell brand products made at the Oklahoma production facility, nor any recalled products, and that retailers and institutions do not serve or sell them.  Learn more about the outbreak of listeriosis.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Get 2 Zero
Week of April 6, 2015

Progress has been made in the year since CDC first responded to the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, but CDC's and the world's efforts must continue until there are zero new cases.

CDC Fact of the Week

Youth Violence
Week of March 30, 2015

Youth violence is a significant public health problem that causes considerable harm to young people, families, and communities. Learn about CDC's work leveraging partnerships across jurisdictions through the STRYVE Action Council, a multi-sector group of organizations with the common objective of mobilizing and sustaining actions that prevent youth violence before it starts.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Deep Vein Thrombosis
Week of March 23, 2015

March is Deep Vein Thrombosis Awareness Month. Are you are at risk for blood clots? Learn the symptoms and steps to protect yourself.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Emergency preparedness for Children
Week of March 16, 2015

Public health emergencies can happen at any time, anywhere. Natural disasters, epidemics, and terrorist attacks that have occurred in recent years have underscored the importance of local, state, and federal public health systems in preparing for potential health threats. CDC's next Grand Rounds March 17, at 1:00 p.m. ET will discuss strategies to address the unique vulnerabilities of children in every stage of emergency planning. A live external webcast will be available. Check here for more information. 

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CDC Fact of the Week

truck driver safety
Week of March 9, 2015

Crashes are the leading cause of on the job death for truck drivers in the US. Learn more.

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CDC Fact of the Week

C. difficile
Week of March 2, 2015

A CDC study finds that nearly half a million Americans suffer from C. difficile infections in a single year. Learn of what can be deadly diarrhea.

CDC Fact of the Week

CRE Infections
Week of February 23, 2015

Some germs are beating even our strongest antibiotics. Rapid action by clinicians and healthcare leaders is needed to stop the rise of lethal CRE infections. Learn more .

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CDC Fact of the Week

meales
Week of February 17, 2015

CDC encourages you to learn how to protect your family from measles

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CDC Fact of the Week

Cigarette icon
Week of February 9, 2015

Did you know that no level of secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure is safe? SHS exposure occurs when nonsmokers breathe in smoke exhaled by smokers or from burning tobacco products. It kills more than 400 infants and 41,000 adult nonsmokers every year. CDC encourages you to learn more.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Disease Detectives
Week of February 2, 2015

Watch CDC at Work videos to learn more about CDC′s role in detecting disease outbreaks, responding to emergencies, researching ways to help you stay healthy, and more.

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CDC Fact of the Week

  Winter is Coming...

Week of January 26, 2015

In the path of the northeast snow storm? Make sure you have your emergency supplies beforehand. Be prepared for severe winter weather.

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CDC Fact of the Week

  Two workers in scrubs

Week of January 19, 2015

Five years after the devastating earthquake in 2010 left millions in need of urgent medical care, Haiti has made significant progress toward rebuilding the national public health system.CDC has led the reconstruction of the health sector to establish disease surveillance systems, enhance laboratory capacity, and develop human capacity in clinical services, epidemiology, and public health leadership. .

CDC Fact of the Week

Binge Drinking
Week of January 12, 2015

An average of 6 people die of alcohol poisoning each day in the US. Alcohol poisoning is caused by drinking large quantities of alcohol in a short period of time. Learn more from the CDC.

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CDC Fact of the Week

New Years resolution: Quit Smoking
Week of January 5, 2015

Smoking is still the number one cause of preventable death and disease in the United States. If quitting is on your calendar for 2015, see these tips from CDC

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CDC Fact of the Week

Women's Health
Week of December 29, 2014

CDC’s contributions to women’s health in 2014 focused on better understanding, improving, and promoting the health, safety, and quality of life of women of all ages. Learn more

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CDC Fact of the Week

Mission Critical
Week of December 22, 2014

Read about the for 2014 and CDC’s mission critical role.

CDC Fact of the Week

Winter Storms
Week of December 15, 2014

Winter storms and cold temperatures can be hazardous, but if you plan ahead, you can stay safe and healthy. Check out CDC’s tips to prepare your home and cars and for power outages and outdoor activity.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Seasonal Flu
Week of December 8, 2014

Have questions about the flu? Find out what you need to know from the CDC.

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CDC Fact of the Week

World Aids Day
Week of December 1, 2014

On December 1, people throughout the world observe World AIDS Day, an opportunity for the global community to honor those living with HIV; the families, friends, caregivers, and communities who support them; and those who have lost their lives to AIDS. As a science-based public health and disease prevention agency, CDC provides support that helps more than 60 countries strengthen their national HIV/AIDS programs and build sustainable public health systems. CDC conducts these activities through the US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), the largest commitment by any nation to combat a single disease.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Middle aged man at the dinner table
Week of November 24, 2014

CDC offers tips to help you manage your diabetes during the holidays. Stay on track by taking medications on schedule and choosing healthy versions of favorite dishes. Remember to plan daily physical activities like walking after meals and dancing at festivities. And read the other suggestions.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Icon of a woman
Week of November 17, 2014

Four thousand women die of cervical cancer each year, yet as many as 93% of cervical cancers could be prevented by screening and HPV (human papillomavirus) vaccination.  CDC wants you to learn more about preventing cervical cancer.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Graphic: CO Detector
Week of November 10, 2014

CDC offers tips to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning. If you don't have a battery-powered or battery back-up CO alarm, now is a great time to buy one. At least 430 people die each year in the US from unintentional, non-fire related CO poisoning.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Grpahic: Document icon
Week of November 3, 2014

This fact sheet explains CDC’s updated guidance to protect America from Ebola. This updated guidance focuses on strengthening how we monitor people who may have been exposed to Ebola and how medical professionals will oversee their care and, when warranted to protect the public health or our communities, limit their movement or activities.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Photo: Three women
Week of October 27, 2014

If you are 50 to 74 years old, CDC recommends a screening mammogram every two years. Other than skin cancer, breast cancer is the most common cancer among American women. Getting mammograms regularly can lower the risk of dying from breast cancer. Get more information.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Photo: Young girl sick in bed
Week of October 20, 2014

CDC Develops a New, Faster Lab Test for Enterovirus D68. Get more information on the test and the virus.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Photo: Young girl sick in bed
Week of October 14, 2014

CDC reminds you that every year, millions of children in the United States catch enteroviruses that can cause coughing, sneezing, and fever. This year, the enterovirus that is most commonly causing respiratory illness in children across the country is enterovirus-D68 (EV-D68). Take basic steps to keep your child from getting and spreading EV-D68.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Photo: Man holding a toddler
Week of October 6, 2014

CDC reminds you that everyone 6 months and older should get an annual flu vaccine. It takes about two weeks after vaccination for your body to develop full protection against the flu. Get vaccinated now to protect yourself and your loved ones! 

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CDC Fact of the Week

Photo: Raccoon
Week of September 29, 2014

World Rabies Day is September 28. CDC encourages to take steps to keep yourself and your family free from rabies. Get the facts on rabies prevention and control.

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CDC Fact of the Week

U.S. presidential seal
Week of September 22, 2014

CDC is working to detecting, prevent and control antibiotic resistance. Learn more about the ways the agency is supporting the President’s Executive Order and the White House National Strategy to Combat Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Photo: Baby Blocks
Week of September 15, 2014

During Infant Mortality Awareness Month, CDC encourages you to learn more about infant mortality risk factors and take action to reduce the risk.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Photo: Emergency checklist
Week of September 8, 2014

Would you be ready if there were an emergency? CDC remind you to be prepared. Visit our website.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Graphic: Child Immunization
Week of September 2, 2014

As children head back to school, CDC says most parents are making sure that their children get vaccinated against potentially serious diseases. Learn more.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Photo: Leisha
Week of August 25, 2014

As CDC experts work 24/7 in response to the Ebola Outbreak in Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Nigeria, they support the response in many different capacities. In an effort to get the worst Ebola outbreak in history under control, CDC is not only providing guidance to healthcare professionals but traveling back to West Africa to focus on stopping the spread of the disease. Read their stories.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Photo: group of people looking up
Week of August 18, 2014

Chickenpox vaccine is the best way to protect yourself and your child from chickenpox. Learn about the CDC’s recommendations

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CDC Fact of the Week

Photo: CDC lab worker
Week of August 11, 2014

CDC is working to stop the Ebola outbreak. Get the latest information.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Photo: Centers for Disease Control and Prevenntion entrance
Week of August 4, 2014

As West Africa Ebola outbreak worsens, CDC issues Level 3 Travel Warning. CDC has today issued a warning to avoid nonessential travel to the West African nations of Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone. This Level 3 travel warning is a reflection of the worsening Ebola outbreak in this region. Get the latest information.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Photo: Centers for Disease Control and Prevenntion entrance
Week of July 28, 2014

CDC has formed an external laboratory safety workgroup of the Advisory Committee to the Director of CDC. This group will provide advice and guidance to the CDC Director and CDC’s new Director of Laboratory Safety

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CDC Fact of the Week

Mobile Apps
Week of July 21, 2014

Learn more about CDC’s apps. Mobile apps are an excellent way to deliver public health information.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Graphic: News tablet
Week of July 14, 2014

The CDC has released an after-action report on the recent anthrax incident. The report highlights steps to improve laboratory quality and safety.

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CDC Fact of the Week

The Lancet
Week of July 7, 2014

CDC Director Tom Frieden, MD, MPH, and CDC Associate Director for Science Harold Jaffe, MD, are co-authors of a commentary article capping a special July 4 issue of The Lancet – The Health of Americans – featuring articles by CDC scientists. Find out more on how Americans can get a better return on their health care investments.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Photo: Plate of fruit and vegetables
Week of July 1, 2014

The Million Hearts initiative announces the launch of a new Healthy Eating and Lifestyle Resource Center, developed in partnership with CDC and Eating-Well magazine. The resource center features lower-sodium, heart-healthy recipes and family-friendly meal plans, with an emphasis on  managing sodium intake, a major contributor to high blood pressure and heart disease. 

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CDC Fact of the Week

graphic: HIV Testing
Week of June 23, 2014

National HIV Testing Day is June 27. CDC recommends that everyone between the ages of 13 and 64 get tested for HIV at least once as part of routine health care and that some people with risk factors get tested more often. Find out more about testing recommendations.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Photo: elderly individula with an assistant
Week of June 16, 2014

CDC works to prevent violence before it occurs. World Elder Abuse Prevention Day recognizes that each year, hundreds of thousands of adults over the age of 60 are abused, neglected, or financially exploited. Get more information on elder abuse prevention.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Photo: Palm tree in a storm
Week of June 9, 2014

If you live in coastal areas at risk, CDC encourages you to begin preparing yourself for hurricane season . The Atlantic hurricane season is June 1 through November 30 each year. Check out the hurricane preparedness tips.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Graphic: Image of a globe
Week of June 2, 2014

Smoking has been the number one cause of preventable death and disease in this country for decades. CDC just celebrated World No Tobacco Day. Learn more about this event sponsored by the World Health Organization.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Week of May 27, 2014

May is National Stroke Awareness Month. CDC urges you to learn the signs of a stroke. Learn more here

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CDC Fact of the Week

Graphic: Recreational Water Illness and Injury (RWII) prevention week
Week of May 19, 2014

Having fun while you swim this summer means knowing how to prevent recreational water illnesses (RWIs) and injuries. The week before Memorial Day, marks the tenth annual Recreational Water Illness and Injury (RWII) Prevention Week. Learn how to stay healthy and safe while enjoying the water!

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CDC Fact of the Week

Graphic: Public Health Grand Rounds
Week of May 15, 2014

Each year, an estimated 50,000 individuals become infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the United States. Learn more at CDC’s Public Health Grand Rounds Presents: Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) for Prevention HIV Infection, Tuesday, May 20, 2014, from 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m., EDT. A live external webcast will be available.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Middle Eastern Repiratory Syndrome
Week of May 5, 2014

On May 2, 2014, the first confirmed case of MERS-CoV was reported in a traveler to the United States.
This is the only confirmed case in the United States. CDC is working very quickly to investigate this first US case of MERS and respond to minimize the spread of this virus. We expect to learn much more in the coming hours and days. We will share updated information through the CDC MERS website.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Photo: Group of children
Week of April 28, 2014

CDC’s Division of Violence Prevention conducts research and programs to better understand the problem of child maltreatment and to prevent it before it begins.
April is National Child Abuse Prevention Month.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Budget
Week of April 21, 2014

On a Budget? CDC suggests these free or low-cost ways to be healthy and save money at the same time.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Photo: Young girl
Week of April 14, 2014

April is Minority Health Month and CDC is highlighting prevention strategies and actions leading to Health Equity. This year's theme, Prevention is Power: Taking Action for Health Equity emphasizes the critical role of prevention in reducing health disparities. Learn more about CDC Actions in support of the HHS Action Plan to Reduce Racial & Ethnic Health Disparities.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Dr. Frieden
Week of April 4, 2014

CDC Supports APHA National Public Health Week
National Public Health Week (NPHW), an initiative of the American Public Health Association (APHA), is April 7-13. The 2014 NPHW theme, “Public Health: Start Here,” focuses on how public health starts at home, from maternal health to nutrition and emergency preparedness. Each day this week focuses on a different area of public health. Read more.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Photo: Child
Week of March 31, 2014

1 in 68 children were identified with autism spectrum disorder. Read more about CDC’s new data on autism spectrum disorder and learn what you can do to help.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Photo: Group of people
Week of March 24, 2014

World TB Day, March 24, brings renewed awareness to this life-threatening disease. CDC’s TB Personal Stories project features real people and their experiences of being diagnosed and treated for latent TB infection or TB disease. Learn more.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Photo: Doctor viewing x-ray
Week of March 17, 2014

Explore the role of CDC, WHO and other partners in combating tuberculosis. Watch CDC’s Public Health Grand Rounds, “Multidrug-resistant Tuberculosis: New Tools to Tackle New Challenges from an Old Foe,” Tuesday, March 18, 2014, from 1-2 p.m., EDT. Watch the live broadcast at either of the following links:

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CDC Fact of the Week

Photo: A doctor at a computer
Week of March 10, 2014

To protect hospital patients and preserve the power of antibiotics, CDC strongly recommends hospitals to adopt a stewardship program that can stop deadly infections.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Photo: Young man in a wheel chair
Week of March 3, 2014

CDC’s Muscular Dystrophy Surveillance Tracking and Research Network is the only population-based muscular dystrophy tracking program in the United States. This program addresses gaps in public health research of muscular dystrophy.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Photo: Two hands holding a heart-shaped balloon.
Week of February 24, 2014

February is American Heart Month. CDC helps you learn about your risks for heart disease and stroke and stay "heart healthy" for yourself and your loved ones. On the words learn about your risks.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Photo: Young lady looking troubled amongst a crowd
Week of February 17, 2014

Watch CDC's Public Health Grand Rounds, "Preventing Youth Violence" which will be held on February 18, at 1:00 p.m. (EST). 

For more, visit. Watch the live broadcast at either of the following links:

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CDC Fact of the Week

Graphic: Carseat buckled into a car
Week of February 10, 2014

CDC wants you to buckle up. Motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of death for children in the US. Buckling up is the best way to save lives and reduce injuries. Learn more.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Week of February 3, 2014

CDC wants you to know the risks of smoking. Dramatic new TV ads that show the harms of smoking are airing across the country beginning February 3, with CDC's 2014 Tips From Former Smokers (Tips) campaign. If you smoke, the real people who tell their stories can inspire you to quit for good. More than 100,000 people are now smoke-free, thanks to earlier Tips ads. Learn more.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Week of January 27, 2014

CDC wants you to stay safe and healthy in winter. Check for helpful tips here.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Week of January 21, 2014

CDC helps fight birth defects.

January is National Birth Defects Prevention Month. Did you know that every 4 ½ minutes, a baby is born with a birth defect in the United States? Help increase awareness in your community. Learn more.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Photo: Engine for a pressure washer.
Week of January 13, 2014

CDC cautions you to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning.

When power outages occur after severe weather (such as winter storms), using alternative sources of power can cause carbon monoxide (CO) to build up in a home and poison the people and animals inside. CO poisoning is entirely preventable. You can protect yourself and your family by acting wisely in case of a power outage and learning the symptoms of CO poisoning. For more information, please visit.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Happy new Year
Week of January 6, 2014

CDC Encourages You to Make 2014 a “Healthy You Year.”

Find ways to boost your health, fitness, and well-being, and be an inspiration to others! Need inspiration to get started? Meet three people who changed their health habits—and their lives. They lost weight, became active, gained energy, and grew in self-confidence. Here are their stories and tips for making healthy living easier. They say if they can do it, you can too!

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CDC Fact of the Week

CDC Slve the Outbreak graphic Week of December 30, 2013

CDC has released an update to Solve the Outbreak, the popular, free iPad app that puts you in the shoes of a member of the Epidemic Intelligence Service.
The app now has 12 outbreaks, giving you the opportunity to climb the ranks and achieve your Disease Detective badge. The immensely popular app, with more than 31,000 downloads, has fans clamoring for more. So if you've been stuck as a Senior Specialist, now's your chance to work your way through the new outbreaks to earn more badges and new achievements.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Week of December 23, 2013
Follow 12 CDC recommended tips for self-care this season. Keep yourself and your loved ones safe and healthy—and ready to enjoy the holidays. See 12 health tips to light up your holidays.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Week of December 16, 2013
Watch CDC’s Public Health Grand Rounds, "Community Water Fluoridation: A Vital 21st Century Public Health Intervention." It will be held on December 17, at 1:00 p.m. (EST).

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CDC Fact of the Week

CDC Slve the Outbreak graphic Week of December 9, 2013

You can be a disease detective.
CDC has released an update to Solve the Outbreak, the popular, free iPad app that puts you in the shoes of a member of the Epidemic Intelligence Service. The app now has 12 outbreaks, giving you the opportunity to climb the ranks and achieve your Disease Detective badge.

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CDC Fact of the Week

International Day of Persons with Disabilities Week of December 2, 2013

CDC operates on the principle that people with disabilities are best served by Public Health when they are included in mainstream public health activities.
Around the world, people with disabilities face physical, social, economic and attitudinal barriers that exclude them from participating fully and effectively as equal members of society. December 3rd is International Day of Persons with Disabilities. This year's theme is “break barriers, open doors: for an inclusive society for all.”

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CDC Fact of the Week

CDC and PEPFAR celebrate a decade of success in fighting global HIV/AIDS Week of November 25, 2013

CDC and PEPFAR celebrate a decade of success in fighting global HIV/AIDS.
As a science-based public health and disease prevention agency, CDC provides support to more than 70 countries to strengthen their national HIV/AIDS programs and build sustainable public health systems through the U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR).

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CDC Fact of the Week

Measles continues to be brought into the U.S., CDC recommends that children get two doses Week of November 11, 2013

Measles continues to be brought into the U.S.
So far in 2013, more than 100 people in the United States have been reported. CDC recommends that children get two doses—the first dose at 12 through 15 months of age and the second dose before entering school at 4 through 6 years of age.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Health is a Human Right exhibition in the David J. Sencer CDC museum. Week of November 11, 2013

A compelling new exhibition in the David J. Sencer CDC Museum, the Health Is a Human Right exhibit looks back through history at how minority groups have experienced health problems differently.
The World Health Organization defines social determinants of health as the circumstances in which people are born, grow up, live, work and age, and access to health care. These circumstances are in turn shaped by a wider set of forces: economics, social policies, and political will.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Photo of family playing outside with baby. Week of November 4, 2013

CDC's Environmental Public Health Tracking Network is a dynamic surveillance system that provides information and data about environmental hazards and the health problems that may be related to them.
Data in the National Tracking Network comes from 24 funded state and local health departments, CDC programs, and other government agencies.

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CDC Fact of the Week

Flu Fact: people with the flu can spread it to others up to six feet away Week of October 28, 2013

Vaccine safety is closely monitored by CDC and the FDA.
Everyone 6 months and older should get an annual flu vaccine. It takes about two weeks after vaccination for your body to develop an immune response.

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Photo: Bag of groceries Week of October 21, 2013

FoodCORE is a program supported by CDC that helps states detect and respond to multistate foodborne disease outbreaks.
Each year, foodborne diseases cause illness in 1 in 6 Americans (or about 48 million people), resulting in about 128,000 hospitalizations and 3,000 deaths FoodCORE centers work together to develop new and better methods to detect, investigate, respond to, and control multistate outbreaks of foodborne diseases.

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Photo: Bottles of wine and liquor Week of September 16, 2013

CDC recently reported that 1 in 8 women and 1 in 5 high school girls binge drink, increasing their risk of breast cancer, heart disease, sexually transmitted infections, and unintended pregnancy.

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Photo Adult woman tickling a young child Week of September 9, 2013

CDC raises awareness of Sickle Cell Disease across the country, including sharing new resources, research, and treatment advances to improve the lives of people with SCD.

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Photo: Dog sitting on a lawn Week of September 3, 2013

CDC recommends against feeding raw food to dogs and cats because of the risk of illness to the pet as well as to people living in the household. Pet food can make pets and people sick.
 

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Photo: Firefighter Week of August 26, 2013

As wildfires burn in the western US, CDC has tips to help you protect yourself from wildfire smoke.
 

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Photo: Young girl playing the violin Week of August 19, 2013

CDC helps you take charge of your diabetes.

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CDC Health Information for International Travel - 2014 Week of August 12, 2013

CDC helps keep you safe when you travel
CDC’s Yellow Book helps business travelers and their doctors prepare for international trips by providing key health information and recommendations for staying safe and healthy while abroad. The Yellow Book is published every two years.

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Photo: Mosquito Week of August 6, 2013

CDC works to protect yourself from diseases caused by mosquitoes
CDC recommends a variety of effective repellents.

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CDC logo
Week of July 30, 2013

CDC investigates foodborne illnesses
CDC is collaborating with public health officials in several states and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to investigate a multistate outbreak of hepatitis A virus infections linked to pomegranate seeds from Turkey. While foodborne hepatitis A outbreaks are not common in the United States, our global food chain makes outbreaks possible.

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Photo: Planet earth Week of July 22, 2013

Learn what CDC is doing to prevent and adapt to the possible health effects of climate change.

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Photo: Two older adults Week of July 15, 2013

CDC has created a preparedness guide and web portal to help states, communities and partners plan for and protect vulnerable and older adults in all hazardous emergencies.
Older adults are especially vulnerable as they are more likely to have multiple chronic conditions, cognitive and physical disabilities.

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Drug Facts Week of July 8, 2013

A new CDC Vital Signs shows women are dying from prescription painkiller overdoses at rates never seen before.
Learn how you can help stop this growing epidemic.

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Photo: Young boy eating at a picnic Week of July 2, 2013

CDC says food safety is a winnable battle
If you are planning or participating in a family reunion over the Fourth of July, follow these tips to make sure your get-together is safe and healthy.

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CDC logo Week of June 24, 2013

CDC provides infection prevention recommendations to fight HAIs.
CDC supports state-based programs to help prevent the 1.7 million healthcare-associated infections in hospitals that cause 99,000 deaths annually and cost between $28-33 billion each year.

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Graphic: Take Charge of your Diabetes Week of June 17, 2013

CDC Fights Diabetes.
Workers with diabetes average two or more work days absent per year than workers without diabetes. Absenteeism costs are reduced by approximately $2.73 for every dollar spent on workplace wellness programs.

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Photo: Accident scene Week of June 10, 2013

CDC works to reduce motor vehicle-related incidents, consistently the leading cause of work-related fatalities in the United States.
CDC’s National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Center for Motor Vehicle Safety conducts research on truck design, driver characteristics and behaviors, and in-vehicle technology, contributing to prevention of large-truck crashes, which affect public safety and cost the US economy $48 billion in 2009.

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Outbreak Response Team Week of June 4, 2013

CDC investigate outbreaks of foodborne, waterborne, and other enteric illnesses in the US.
CDC’s Outbreak Response Team collaborates with a national network of epidemiologists and other public health officials. In 2012, CDC monitored between 16 and 57 potential food poisoning clusters each week and investigated more than 200 multistate clusters. These investigations led to the recalls of 300 products.

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Two CDC lab workers Week of May 27, 2013

CDC plays a pivotal role in public health preparedness for catastrophic events
Through CDC’s Cities Readiness Initiative, which focuses on preparedness in the nation’s densely populated metropolitan areas, state and large metropolitan public health departments have developed plans to rapidly respond to a large-scale bioterrorist event.

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Photo: Worker in a hazard suit Week of May 20, 2013

CDC played a pivotal role identifying cases of anthrax
In 2001, CDC played a pivotal role identifying cases of anthrax, tracking exposures, and developing a response to treat the 32,000 individuals who were, or may have been, exposed. The anthrax bioterrorism attack of 2001 resulted in 5 deaths, 22 illnesses and economic costs exceeding $1 billion. The projected economic costs of a city-wide release of a bioterrorist agent like anthrax would reach beyond $1.8 trillion, resulting in illnesses and deaths, antibiotic treatment, decontamination and work disruption.

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Photo: Montage of faces Week of May 13, 2013

CDC leads the National Tobacco Control Program
CDC leads the National Tobacco Control Program facilitating national efforts to reduce tobacco use, which causes more than 400,000 deaths per year, and costs $193 billion annually (nearly $96 billion in direct medical costs and an additional $97 billion in lost productivity).

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Photos; Workplace photo montage Week of May 6, 2013

CDC leads workplace safety research
CDC leads workplace safety research, health hazard evaluations, and programs including the Total Worker Health Program, to help reduce occupational injuries and illnesses, which cost employers approximately $74 billion in workers’ compensation insurance in 2009.

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Photo: First responders getting vaccinated Week of April 29, 2013

CDC supports state and local preparedness activities:
CDC supports state and local preparedness activities through funding and technical assistance. For example, CDC’s Public Health Emergency Preparedness cooperative agreement has provided over $9 billion in funding since 2002 to state, local and territorial public health departments to build and strengthen their ability to respond effectively to public health emergencies. In response to the 2009 influenza pandemic, CDC administered $1.4 billon to upgrade state and local preparedness and response capacity.

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Mosquito Week of April 22, 2013

World Malaria Day April 25:
As we mark World Malaria Day April 25, did you know that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has its roots in malaria? It was founded July 1, 1946 as the successor to the World War II Malaria Control in War Areas program. CDC is specifically directed by Congress to provide leadership in the areas of monitoring, evaluation, surveillance, and operational research for malaria.

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Photo: two girls dressed  in Hijab Week of April 15, 2013

CDC is available 24-7, Saving Lives, Protecting People
CDC helps other countries rapidly find, identify, and quickly control new diseases and bioterrorist threats. For more information visit CDC’s Global Disease Detection Program.

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Photo: Microsope image of ebola Week of April 8, 2013

CDC studies highly infectious viruses, including those which cause hemorrhagic manifestations in humans.
In 1976 CDC investigated two outbreaks of an unknown deadly hemorrhagic fever, later called Ebola. To see a listing of Ebola outbreaks from 1976 to the present.

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Logo: Natinal Public Health week Week of April 1, 2013

It’s National Public Health Week.
CDC is the nation's health protection agency, working 24/7 to protect America from health and safety threats, both foreign and domestic. CDC increases the health security of our nation.

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Photo: Family of three embracing each other Week of March 25, 2013

The CDC’s Vision for the 21st Century is “Health Protection…Health Equity”.
What is CDC doing to advance this mission?

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Photo: David Senser Museum Week of March 18, 2013

The David J. Sencer CDC Museum is a Smithsonian Affiliate.
The CDC museum was established in 1996 and renamed the David J. Sencer CDC Museum in 2011 to honor the longest-serving CDC Director.

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Photo: Vaccination Week of March 11, 2013

CDC works to ensure that all vaccines are safe whether you receive a shot in the US or anywhere in the world.
Monitoring health problems after vaccination is essential to ensure the US continues to have the safest, most effective vaccine supply in history.

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Photo: Health worker with a breathing  mask on Week of March 4, 2013

CDC and its partners continue to monitor SARS globally.
Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) was first reported in Asia in 2003 and CDC immediately began working to identify, track, and treat cases.

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Graphic: Crisis and Emergency Risk Communication logo Week of February 25, 2013

CDC helps partners and stakeholders in preparing for, responding to and recovering from the threat of bioterrorism, emergent diseases, and other hazards.
CDC created the Crisis and Emergency Risk Communication (CERC) training program in 2002. CERC training has been conducted in all 10 HHS Regions and 15 countries.

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Graphic: Vital Signs logo Week of February 18, 2013

CDC tracks and reports state-by-state rates of colorectal cancer.
A CDC report says that rates of new cases and deaths of colorectal cancer are decreasing and more adults are being screened.

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Photo: Two lab workers Week of February 11, 2013

CDC regulates the possession, use, and transfer of biological agents and toxins that could pose a severe threat to public health and safety via the Select Agent Program.
This program has greatly enhanced the nation's oversight of the safety and security of select agents and is overseen by the Division of Select Agents and Toxins (DSAT), located in CDC's Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response (OPHPR).

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Photo: Man working with toxic smoke Week of February 4, 2013

CDC/NIOSH provides national and world leadership to prevent workplace illnesses and injuries.
CDC/National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health works to identify and track the association between occupational exposures and cancers.

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Photo: Group of young adults Week of January 28, 2013

CDC looks for motivated students, graduates, and health professionals for a variety of exciting public health training programs.
CDC offers public health training fellowships for everyone from high school students to trained professionals.

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Photo: Salad greens Week of January 21, 2013

CDC helps you protect yourself from E. coli infections.
Food regulators use CDC data to improve food handling and production standards for foods that can be contaminated by E. coli 0157. Outbreaks of E. coli infections under investigation by CDC.

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Photo: Young adult with an inhaler Week of January 14, 2013

CDC’s National Asthma Control Program is a driving force in asthma control.
Nearly 25 million people in the U.S. have asthma. Follow this link for more information about CDC’s asthma control programs.

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Photo: Two young girls with puppies Week of January 7, 2013

CDC provides information about the health concerns of owning and caring for animals.
On the "Healthy Pets Healthy People" website you can browse by animal or by disease.

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Graphic: Cover for the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey Week of December 31, 2012

Sexual violence, stalking, and intimate partner violence are important and widespread public health problems in the United States
CDC’s National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey collects information on partner and sexual violence and stalking. Review the survey.

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Photo: Woman wih handcuffs on Week of December 24, 2012

CDC fights the spread of infectious disease in crowded populations, for example in prisons
CDC provides recommendations and guidance for detecting, treating, and tracking infectious diseases in prisons.

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Photo: Legionnaires virus Week of December 17, 2012

CDC’s disease detectives protect America when new diseases strike
CDC’s discovery of the causes of Legionnaires’ Disease (1968) and Toxic-Shock Syndrome (1980), helped protect people and saves lives from these health threats.

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Photo: Lab worker Week of December 10, 2012

CDC's work around the world keeps America safe from health threats 
For more than 60 years CDC’s scientific expertise has been called upon to help save lives and limit the spread of disease around the world. CDC has more than 304 workers in 50-plus countries.

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Photo: Four family memebers Week of December 3, 2012

CDC tracks blood safety for patients with rare disorders
A new CDC program monitors blood safety for people with Thalassemia, a group of genetic blood disorders; the most severe, Cooley's Anemia. CDC is tracking blood safety for thalassemia patients, and establishing a network of specialized health-care centers to manage the disease, treat it, and prevent patient complications.

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Photo: Sick child Week of November 26, 2012

CDC helps protect children from overdoses of cold/cough medicines
CDC’s discovered that children’s cold/cough medicines cause thousands of overdoses a year. These findings led drug companies to voluntarily change the labels on these products.

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Graphic: CDC 24/7 logo Week of November 19, 2012

CDC protects Americans from infections during dental visits
In 1990, CDC reported the possible transmission of HIV from a dentist to a patient in Florida during an invasive procedure. This led to CDC guidelines that now help keep people safe with protection between dental staff and patients, and proper cleaning of instruments and equipment. Read the original report.

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Photo: Elderly couple, smiling Week of November 12, 2012

CDC works to prevent falls among older adults
Each year, one in three adults age 65 and older falls. Falls can cause moderate to severe injuries, such as hip fractures and head injuries, and can increase the risk of early death. CDC is helping protect older adults by supporting proven programs and providing information to both individuals and health care providers.

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Graphic: United States map with weapon stockpile information Week of November 5, 2012

CDC protects communities and workers from stockpiled weapon threats
CDC oversees the Army’s destruction of the nation’s stockpiled chemical weapons to make sure these are destroyed in a way that protects workers and keeps communities safe.

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Graphic: Take Charge; Take the Test Week of October 29, 2012

CDC is helping keep newborns safe from HIV infection
In 1998, CDC research found that treating HIV-infected pregnant women with a short course of AZT could reduce the risk of prenatal HIV transmission by over 50 percent. This saves countless lives in American and around the world.

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Photo: Quarantine station Week of October 22, 2012

CDC protects America from outbreaks of infectious diseases
There are 20 US Quarantine Stations, staffed with CDC quarantine public health officers. They help prevent the introduction of infectious diseases into the US by responding to illnesses in travelers arriving in the United States, screening cargo and animals that may pose a risk to human health, and working closely with partners at entry points to the United States.

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Graphic: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) logo Week of October 15, 2012

CDC takes the health pulse of the nation
CDC’s has produced the health statistics reporting for America from its National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) since the early 1960s. The surveys determine the health and nutritional status of adults and children in the U.S. and are the basis for national measurement standards such as height, weight, and blood pressure. Review the latest survey results.

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Photo: Cigarettes Week of October 8, 2012

CDC works to protect Americans from the health threats of tobacco use
Did you know that 443,000 Americans die of smoking or exposure to secondhand smoke each year? For every smoking-related death, another 20 people suffer with a smoking-related disease. CDC offers tools and resources on quitting smoking.

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Graphic: Doctor and nurse icons Week of October 1, 2012

CDC is helping to drive down health-care related infections
People getting medical care can catch serious infections called health care-associated infections. CDC helps monitor and prevent these infections which are an important threat to patient safety and recovery. Its recommendations for preventing many hospital-related infections help keep patients safe around the use of catheters and surgical sites.

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Graphic: World Trade Center (WTC) Health Program logo Week of September 24, 2012

CDC supports the health of responders and others affected by the 9/11 attacks.
CDC administers the government’s program to provide health monitoring and treatment for responders and others harmed by the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, stimulates new research on health effects associated with the attacks, and anticipates the long-term health needs of those we serve.

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Graphic: Breast and cervical cancer screening campaign logo Week of September 17, 2012

CDC helps to provide access to breast and cervical cancer screening services to underserved women in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, 5 U.S. territories, and 12 tribes.

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Photo: Young boy staring Week of September 10, 2012

CDC tracks Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) and estimates that 1 in 110 U.S. children, on average, have an ASD.

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Photo:A  Couple running Week of September 3, 2012

CDC invites organizations interested in offering a lifestyle change program to prevent type-2 diabetes to become a part of the Diabetes Prevention Recognition Program.

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Photo: CDC lab worker Week of August 27, 2012

CDC’s online Public Health Image Library (PHIL) includes photos, illustrations, and multimedia files free for downloading.

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Photo CDC lab worker Week of August 20, 2012

CDC helps other countries rapidly find, identify, and quickly control new diseases and bioterrorist threats.

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Photo: CDC Arctic Investigations Program building Week of August 13, 2012

CDC works with scientists in Russia, Scandinavian countries, and other Arctic Circle regions to focus on disease concerns at the top of the globe.

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Photo: Airplane flying over palm trees Week of August 6, 2012

CDC lets people know if they have been exposed to certain communicable diseases while traveling on an airplane.

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Graphic: Dollar sign with health monitor graphics superimposed over it Week of July 30, 2012

CDC trains public health economists on how to help determine which public health programs and decisions are good investments.

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Photo: Bombing device with a timer Week of July 16, 2012

CDC developed guidelines and system-wide solutions to address surge needs of injured patients after a bombing or mass casualty events.

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Photo: CDC health worker administering polio vaccine Week of July 9, 2012

In 1950 CDC conducted its first investigation of a polio outbreak in Paulding County, Ohio. View more information on the history of polio eradication.

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Photo: Truck with vaccine cargo Week of July 2, 2012

CDC stockpiles and provides antibiotics, vaccines, chemical antidotes and other supplies, which can be released in just a few hours, from its Strategic National Stockpile (SNS).

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Photo: Cholera bacteria Week of June 25, 2012

In 1958 the first CDC Disease Detectives went overseas to Southeast Asia to investigate an epidemic of cholera and smallpox.

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Photo: Syringe Week of June 18, 2012

CDC carefully watches what influenza viruses are circulating and each year helps select the viruses that will be used to make the next season’s vaccines.

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Graphic: Computer model of a virus Week of June 11, 2012

Each week, CDC tracks and shares information about more than 60 different diseases with reports we get from the states. Access the latest annual summary of these diseases.

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Photo: Periodic table of elements symbol for Lead, Pb Week of June 4, 2012

In the United States, approximately 95% of elevated blood lead levels in adults are work related.

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Photo: Cruise ship Week of May 28, 2012

CDC inspects cruise ships and posts the inspection scores online. Check the latest ratings.

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Photo: Salmonella Week of May 21, 2012

CDC works to find out what germs may be hiding in foods and making us sick.

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Photo: Woman receiving a vaccination Week of May 14, 2012

CDC studies demonstrated that treating HIV-infected pregnant women with a short course of AZT could reduce the risk of prenatal HIV transmission by over 50%.

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Photo: Two men working with toxic smoke Week of May 7, 2012

CDC/National Institute for Occupational Safety & Health works to identify and track the association between occupational exposures and cancers.

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Photo: Lab worker Week of April 30, 2012

CDC provides information about developmental milestones and screening for all children.

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