CDC 24-7 Fact of the Week Archives

H2 Heading

H3 Heading

Fact of the Week - Archives

Woman with a patient's cap
Week of December 27, 2021

If you get a fever during your chemotherapy treatment, it’s a medical emergency. Take your temperature any time you feel warm, flushed, chilled, or not well. Call your doctor right away if you have a temperature of 100.4’F (38’C) or higher.

Coffee cup next to a window
Week of December 20, 2021

Eating well-balanced meals will help you stay warmer during winter storms. Do not drink alcoholic or caffeinated beverages—they cause your body to lose heat faster. Instead, drink warm, sweet beverages or broth to help keep yourself warm. If you have any dietary restrictions, ask your doctor.

Woman smiling
December 13, 2021

Many people are having a hard time coping during or after adverse events, like the COVID-19 pandemic. Rates of emotional and behavioral health issues, such as depression, anxiety, substance use, domestic violence, and suicidal thoughts, have increased since early 2020.

Woman blowing her nose
December 6, 2021

Most people with flu have mild illness and do not need medical care or antiviral drugs. If you get sick with flu symptoms, in most cases, you should stay home and avoid contact with other people except to get medical care.

boy blowing nose
Week of November 29, 2021

There is no cure for a cold. To feel better, you should get lots of rest and drink plenty of fluids. Over-the-counter medicines may help ease symptoms but will not make your cold go away any faster. Always read the label and use medications as directed.

Pregnant woman with her hand over her abdomen
Week of November 22, 2021

Although the overall risks are low, people who are pregnant or recently pregnant are at an increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19 when compared to people who are not pregnant.

woman with gloves, hat and scarf over her mouth
Week of November 15, 2021

Winter storms and cold temperatures can be dangerous. Stay safe and healthy by planning ahead. Prepare your home and vehicles. Prepare for power outages and outdoor activity. Check on older adults.

mom with baby
Week of November 8, 2021

In 2020, there were fewer reported measles cases than previous years. However, measles elimination targets continued to backslide as immunity gaps grew and disease surveillance deteriorated.

traveler
Week of November 1, 2021

Influenza (flu) can cause mild to severe illness, and at times can lead to death. Flu is different from a cold. Flu usually comes on suddenly.

traveler
Week of October 25, 2021

Travel requirements to enter the United States are changing, starting November 8, 2021. Check your destination’s COVID-19 situation and travel requirements before traveling. Countries may have their own entry and exit requirements.

Portrait Of Loving Senior Couple Relaxing On Sofa At Home
Week of October 18, 2021

People 65 years and older are at higher risk of developing serious complications from flu compared with young, healthy adults.

A woman getting a mammogram
Week of October 4, 2021

Other than skin cancer, breast cancer is the most common cancer among American women. Mammograms are the best way to find breast cancer early, when it is easier to treat and before it is big enough to feel or cause symptoms.

Three middle aged women jogging
Week of September 27, 2021

Physical activity is a way to manage and reduce arthritis pain and decrease the likelihood of activity limitations, but nearly a third of adults with arthritis are not physically active. Learn how physical activity can help ease severe joint pain.

cockatiel-cage-medium
Week of September 20, 2021

Disasters can happen without warning, so be prepared. Make sure you have proper equipment for pets to ride in the car (carriers, harnesses, pet seatbelts). Click through for more tips to help protect pets during emergencies.

two people holding each other on t a beach
Week of September 13, 2021

Many factors can increase the risk for suicide or protect against it. Suicide is connected to other forms of injury and violence. For example, people who have experienced violence, including child abuse, bullying, or sexual violence have a higher suicide risk.

back to school
Week of September 6, 2021

As summer ends, there is a lot to do to get kids ready for school. This is especially true because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Learn what parents can do to get ready for the new school year, too.

flooded street and stop sign
Week of August 30, 2021

Floods, big or small, can have devastating effects on your home and your family. You can take steps to reduce the harm caused by flooding. Learn how to prepare for a flood, stay safe during a flood, and protect your health when you return home after a flood.

student wearing a mask in a hallway
Week of August 23, 2021

In addition to universal indoor masking, CDC recommends schools maintain at least 3 feet of physical distance between students within classrooms to reduce transmission risk. When it is not possible to maintain a physical distance of at least 3 feet, such as when schools cannot fully re-open while maintaining these distances, it is especially important to layer multiple other prevention strategies, such as screening testing.

pregnant woman holding belly
Week of August 16, 2021

Pregnant and recently pregnant people are at an increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19—including illness that requires hospitalization, intensive care, or a ventilator or special equipment to breathe, or results in death—compared with nonpregnant people. Additionally, pregnant people with COVID-19 are at increased risk for preterm birth and might be at increased risk for other poor pregnancy outcomes.

healthcare provider holding vial
Week of August 9, 2021

Some data suggest the Delta variant might cause more severe illness than previous strains in unvaccinated persons. In two different studies from Canada and Scotland, patients infected with the Delta variant were more likely to be hospitalized than patients infected with Alpha or the original virus strains.

wildfire
Week of August 2, 2021

When wildfires create smoky conditions it’s important for everyone to reduce their exposure to smoke. Wildfire smoke irritates your eyes, nose, throat, and lungs. It can make it hard to breathe and make you cough or wheeze.

doctor putting a band-aid on a patient after a shot
Week of July 26, 2021

Information about the characteristics of COVID-19 variants is rapidly emerging. Scientists are working to learn more about how easily they spread, whether they could cause more severe illness, and whether currently authorized vaccines will protect people against them. Learn more about COVID-19 variants at our page.

city baking under the hot sun
Week of July 19, 2021

High temperatures kill hundreds of people every year. Heat-related deaths and illness are preventable, yet more than 700 people die from extreme heat every year in the United States.

we can do stickers
Week of June 14, 2021

COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective. After you’ve been fully vaccinated, you can resume activities that you did prior to the pandemic. Learn more about COVID-19 vaccines at our page.

office desk with mask on it
Week of June 7, 2021

Stagger vaccination appointments so that you are not vaccinating all workers at the same time in a single department, service, or unit where continued operations are required. Find this and more considerations to minimize the effect of post-vaccination signs and symptoms on employees and the workplace at our page.

hurricane
Week of May 31, 2021

Be ready for hurricane season. If you need to evacuate, prepare a “go kit” with personal items you cannot do without during an emergency. Include items that can help protect you and others from COVID-19, such as hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol, bar or liquid soap, disinfectant wipes (if available) and two masks for each person.

World TB Day
Week of March 22, 2021

Each year, we recognize World Tuberculosis (TB) Day on March 24 to educate the public about the impact of TB around the world. Learn more about what we and our partners are doing to eliminate this devastating disease.

Kidney Disease risk factors
Week of March 15, 2021

More than one in seven American adults are estimated to have chronic kidney disease (CKD). CKD is a condition in which the kidneys are damaged and cannot filter blood as well as they should. If left untreated, CKD can progress to kidney failure and early cardiovascular disease. Learn about the risk factors for CKD.

toddler nutrition banner
Week of March 8, 2021

Good nutrition during the first 2 years of life is vital for healthy growth and development. Starting good nutrition practices early can help children develop healthy dietary patterns. Explore our Infant and Toddler Nutrition page to find nutrition information to help give your child a healthy start in life.

Man and woman embracing
Week of March 1, 2021

Of cancers that affect both men and women, colorectal cancer is the second leading cancer killer in the United States, but it doesn’t have to be. Colorectal cancer screening saves lives. If you are 50 years old or older, get screened now.

Heart Disease at any age
Week of February 22, 2021

Heart disease doesn’t happen just to older adults. It is happening to younger adults more and more often. High rates of obesity and high blood pressure among younger people are putting them at risk for heart disease earlier in life. Learn more about your risk for heart disease and the steps you need to take now to help your heart.

man preparing vegetable salad
Week of February 15, 2021

Your body needs a small amount of sodium to work properly, but too much sodium is bad for your health. Excess sodium can increase your blood pressure and your risk for heart disease and stroke. Learn what you can do to reduce sodium consumption.

Couple with the sun behind them
Week of February 8, 2021

February is American Heart Month and our Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention is shining a light on high blood pressure, a leading risk factor for heart disease and stroke. Learn more about how to help manage high blood pressure in your community.

American Heart Month Feb 2021
Week of February 1, 2021

Despite increases in awareness over the past decades, only about half (56%) of women recognize that heart disease is their number 1 killer. Learn more facts about women and heart disease.

man practicing yoga
Week of January 4, 2021

Learn how to overcome barriers to physical activity so you can get the health benefits you need.

Happy New Year
Week of December 28, 2020

The safest way to celebrate the new year is to celebrate at home with the people who live with you or virtually with friends and family. Learn more about how to protect yourself and others from getting or spreading COVID-19 or the flu this holiday season.

tree with lights
Week of December 14, 2020

The safest way to celebrate winter holidays this year is to celebrate at home with the people who live with you. Learn more about how to protect yourself and others from getting or spreading COVID-19 or the flu this holiday season.

Roll your sleeve up to fight flu.
Week of December 7, 2020

National Influenza Vaccination Week (NIVW), December 6 -12, highlights the importance of influenza vaccination. Join our social media #SleeveUp campaign by featuring photos of yourself and others in your community while getting a flu vaccine or showing off a bandage after getting a flu vaccine.

World Aids Day
Week of November 30, 2020

Observe World AIDS Day on December 1, 2020: unite in the fight against HIV, show your support for people living with HIV, and remember those who have died.

Thanksgiving Fall Pies
Week of November 23, 2020

Traditional Thanksgiving gatherings with family and friends are fun but can increase the chances of getting or spreading COVID-19. Follow these tips to make your Thanksgiving holiday safer.

Milestones Tracker App
Week of November 16, 2020

From birth to 5 years, your child should reach milestones in how he plays, learns, speaks, acts and moves. Track your child’s development using our FREE Milestone Tracker App and act early if you have a concern.

Woman coughing
Week of November 9, 2020

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) makes breathing difficult for the 16 million Americans who have been diagnosed with COPD. Millions more suffer from COPD, but have not been diagnosed and are not being treated. Learn if you are at risk for having COPD.

Mother and daughter preparing vegetables for lunch
Week of November 2, 2020

A healthy and balanced diet is a key part of diabetes management. Meal prepping, or preparing your meals ahead of time, can help you better manage your diabetes. Read more for tips on how to get started.

Girl being bullied by other girls.
Week of October 26, 2020

October is National Bullying Prevention Awareness Month. Learn more about how you can prevent youth violence and #StopBullying in your community.

shoulder with bandage
Week of October 19, 2020

Roll up your sleeve for your annual flu vaccine. A flu vaccine this season can help reduce the burden of flu illnesses, hospitalizations and deaths on the health care system and conserve scarce medical resources for the care of people with COVID-19. Learn more.

Hurricane Evacuation Sign
Week of August 24, 2020

During and after a hurricane, you may need supplies to keep your family safe and healthy. Remember that a hurricane could cut off your power and water supply. You also may not be able to drive because of damage to your car. Roads may be flooded or blocked. That’s why it’s best to be prepared—stock up on everything you might need now. Learn more here.

image of an african american woman
Week of August 17, 2020

700 women die every year in the United States from pregnancy-related complications. Learn more about the urgent maternal warning signs and how you can help save her life with our new Hear Her Campaign..

woman breastfeeding
Week of August 10, 2020

August is National Breastfeeding Month! Breastfeeding is the best source of nutrition for most infants. It can also reduce the risk for certain health conditions for both infants and mothers. Learn more about breastfeeding and what CDC is doing.

Image of a neighborhood
Week of July 13, 2020

Individuals, businesses, health departments, and community settings (such as schools) can help slow the spread of COVID-19. Learn more about our Community Mitigation Framework and take action.

Mom sitting with kids on beach
Week of July 6, 2020

Nearly 5 million people are treated for skin cancer each year in the United States. Skin cancer can be serious, expensive, and sometimes even deadly. Protect your family and yourself from skin cancer with these sun safety tips for families.

woman coughing into elbow
Week of June 29, 2020

Do you know the symptoms? People with COVID-19 have had a wide range of symptoms reported – ranging from mild symptoms to severe illness. Symptoms may include Fever or chills, cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, and more. These symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure to the virus.

social distancing
Week of June 15, 2020

Limit close contact with others outside your household in indoor and outdoor spaces. Since people can spread the virus before they know they are sick, it is important to stay away from others when possible, even if you—or they—have no symptoms. Social distancing is especially important for people who are at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19. Learn more about social distancing.

adult taking young girls temperature
Week of June 1, 2020

Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C) is a condition where different body parts can become inflamed, including the heart, lungs, kidneys, brain, skin, eyes, or gastrointestinal organs. We do not yet know what causes MIS-C. Learn more about MIS-C and what to do if you think your child is sick with MIS-C.

Concept of healthy lifestyle with dog and man hiking outdoor
Week of May 25, 2020

Traveling long distances to visit a park may contribute to the spread of COVID-19. Visit parks that are close to your home and follow guidelines to reduce the risk of transmission. Read more at our page on visiting parks and recreational facilities.

patient and doctor covid
Week of May 18, 2020

Wondering if you should seek testing for COVID-19? CDC has guidance for who should be tested, but decisions about testing are made by state and local health departments or healthcare providers. Learn more about testing and updated guidance here.

sunscreen safety
Week of May 11, 2020

May is Skin Cancer Detection and Prevention Month. You can reduce your risk of skin damage and skin cancer by seeking shade under an umbrella, tree, or other shelter before you need relief from the sun. Your best bet to protect your skin is to use sunscreen or wear protective clothing when you’re outside—even when you’re in the shade. Learn more.

Man with mask
Week of May 4, 2020

CDC recommends wearing cloth face coverings in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain (e.g., grocery stores and pharmacies), especially in areas of significant community-based transmission. Learn more about specific guidelines for cloth face covering use and how to make your own at home by visiting our web page.

Man with fever taking temperature
Week of April 6, 2020

Watch for symptoms of coronavirus. Reported illnesses have ranged from mild symptoms to severe illness and death for confirmed coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases. Learn more about symptoms of coronavirus and what to do if you think you may be infected.

Man coughing
Week of March 23, 2020

Based on what has been seen previously as the incubation period of MERS-CoV viruses, the following symptoms of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) may appear 2-14 days after exposure: Fever, cough, shortness of breath. If you think you have been exposed to COVID-19 and develop a fever and symptoms, such as cough or difficulty breathing, call your healthcare provider for medical advice.

Image of different foods
Week of March 9, 2020

Most Americans consume about 3,400 milligrams (mg) of sodium each day, which is much more than the recommended amount of 2,300 mg per day (about one teaspoon of salt). Sodium increases blood pressure, which raises the risk for heart disease and stroke. For tips on how to avoid excess sodium in your diet, visit our National Nutrition Month page.

Doctor with man and son
Week of February 17, 2020

The #HowIRecommend video series features short, informative videos from clinicians like you. These videos explain the importance of vaccination, how to effectively address questions from parents about vaccine safety and effectiveness, and how clinicians routinely recommend same day vaccination to their patients.

Fact of the Week: Winterstorm
Week of December 2, 2019

Are you prepared for a winter storm? Winter storms can bring cold temperatures, power failures, loss of communication services, and icy roads. To keep yourself and your loved ones safe, you should know how to prepare your home and your car before a winter storm hits.

Holiday Turkey
Week of November 25, 2019

Never thaw your turkey by leaving it out on the counter. A thawing turkey must defrost at a safe temperature. When the turkey is left out at room temperature for more than 2 hours, its temperature becomes unsafe. Bacteria can grow rapidly in the “danger zone” between 40°F and 140°F. Visit our food safety page for more Thanksgiving safety tips.

Fact of the week antibiotic resistance
Week of November 11, 2019

USAAW is an annual observance that raises awareness of the threat of antibiotic resistance and the importance of appropriate antibiotic use. Use our partner toolkit to help raise awareness of the importance of appropriate antibiotic use.

Woman blowing her nose.
Week of November 4, 2019

Like everyone, people with diabetes get the flu and get sick sometimes, even when you try your best to prevent it. Being prepared and knowing what to do when you get sick is important. There are several things you can do now to prepare for sick days. Visit our page to learn more.

Don't let an eye infection be the scariest part of your Halloween
Week of October 28, 2019

Don’t let an eye infection be the scariest part of your Halloween. Using decorative lenses without a valid prescription can cause serious harm to your eyes—haunting you long after October 31st. Learn more about contact lense safety at our page

A pregnant woman speaking to a nurse about her pregnancy
Week of October 21, 2019

Are you pregnant? Getting a flu shot this month is a very important item to check off your list. Ask your healthcare professional about getting a flu shot to protect you and your baby.

family inside house watching television
Week of September 30, 2019

If you need to stay home during a hurricane, stay inside. Even if it looks calm, don’t go outside. Wait until you hear or see an official message that the hurricane is over. Sometimes, weather gets calm in the middle of a storm but then gets worse again quickly.

two people sneezing into hankerchief
Week of September 23, 2019

CDC recommends a yearly flu vaccine as the first and most important step in protecting against influenza and its potentially serious complications. Learn more at our flu prevention web page.

Flu season begins in late September. Use our Ready Wrigley preparedness books for kids to help children understand how to prepare for flu season and the importance of getting a flu shot.
Week of September 16, 2019

Flu season begins in late September. Use our Ready Wrigley preparedness books for kids to help children understand how to prepare for flu season and the importance of getting a flu shot.

Parents with children
Week of September 9, 2019

During and after a disaster, it is natural to experience different and strong emotions. Coping with these feelings and getting help when you need it will help you, your family, and your community recover from a disaster. Connect with family, friends, and others in your community. Take care of yourself and each other, and know when and how to seek help.

hurricane
Week of September 2, 2019

Hurricanes don’t only affect people living along the coast. They can still cause damage even if you live hundreds of miles from the shore. If you’re in an area where hurricanes are a risk, you need a plan.

Doctor talking to a patient.
Week of August 26, 2019

The #HowIRecommend video series features short, informative videos from clinicians like you. These videos explain the importance of vaccination, how to effectively address questions from parents about vaccine safety and effectiveness, and how clinicians routinely recommend same day vaccination to their patients.

close up of woman puting contact lens in eye
Week of August 19, 2019

Enjoy the comfort and benefits of contact lenses while lowering your chance of complications. Failure to wear, clean, and store your lenses as directed by your eye doctor raises the risk of developing serious infections.

pregnant woman speaking with health care professional
Week of August 12, 2019

Vaccines help protect you and your baby against serious diseases. You probably know that when you are pregnant, you share everything with your baby. That means when you get vaccines, you aren’t just protecting yourself—you are giving your baby some early protection too. CDC recommends you get a whooping cough and flu vaccine during each pregnancy to help protect yourself and your baby.

woman holding a baby
Week of August 5, 2019

Breastfeeding is an Investment in Health. Breastfeeding can help lower a mother’s risk of high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, ovarian cancer, and breast cancer.

blue human torso with red liver
Week of July 29, 2019

Hepatitis means inflammation of the liver, and is often caused by a virus. The most common types of viral hepatitis are hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C. Learn more about the ABCs of hepatitis.

Lightning storm
Week of July 22, 2019

Although the odds of being struck by lightning in a given year are less than 1 in 1,000,000, some factors can put you at greater risk. Learn more about lightning safety.

kids running and smiling
Week of July 15, 2019

To help ensure the health and safety of young athletes, CDC developed the HEADS UP Concussion in Youth Sports initiative to offer information about concussions to coaches, parents, and athletes involved in youth sports. The HEADS UP initiative provides important information on preventing, recognizing, and responding to a concussion.

Two workers are walking near construction site
Week of July 8, 2019

Working outside on a hot day? Use the NIOSH Heat Safety App to plan outdoor work activities based on how hot it feels throughout the day. Featuring real-time heat index and hourly forecasts, specific to your location, as well as occupational safety and health recommendations from OSHA and NIOSH.

The sun's ultraviolet (UV) rays can damage your skin in as little as 15 minutes. You can reduce your risk of skin damage and skin cancer by seeking shade under an umbrella, tree, or other shelter before you need relief from the sun. Your best bet to protect your skin is to use sunscreen or wear protective clothing when you're outside—even when you're in the shade. Learn more about sun safety.
Week of July 1, 2019

The sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays can damage your skin in as little as 15 minutes. You can reduce your risk of skin damage and skin cancer by seeking shade under an umbrella, tree, or other shelter before you need relief from the sun. Your best bet to protect your skin is to use sunscreen or wear protective clothing when you’re outside—even when you’re in the shade. Learn more about sun safety.

toy plane on top of passport on world map
Week of June 24, 2019

Infants 6-11 months old should get one dose of the MMR vaccine before international travel. All children 12 months and older should get two doses of MMR vaccine, at least 28 days apart.

Ebola virus was first discovered in 1976 near the Ebola River in what is now the Democratic Republic of Congo. Since then, the virus has been infecting people from time to time, leading to outbreaks in several African countries. Learn more about Ebola virus here
Week of June 17, 2019

Ebola virus was first discovered in 1976 near the Ebola River in what is now the Democratic Republic of Congo. Since then, the virus has been infecting people from time to time, leading to outbreaks in several African countries. Learn more about Ebola virus here.

lgbt students
Week of June 10, 2019

CDC is committed to protecting and improving the health and quality of life of all youth. Sexual minority youth or lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth are a part of every community, every race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic class, and live in all parts of the United States. Learn more about health risks of LGBT students here.

Stroke kills about 140,000 Americans each year—that's 1 out of every 20 deaths. Most strokes are preventable. Learn more about stroke, the signs and symptoms, and how to prevent stroke here.
Week of June 3, 2019

Stroke kills about 140,000 Americans each year—that’s 1 out of every 20 deaths. Most strokes are preventable. Learn more about stroke, the signs and symptoms, and how to prevent stroke here.

Grilling Safety
Week of May 27, 2019

Food poisoning peaks in the summer months when warmer temperatures cause foodborne germs to flourish. Follow these steps for a safe and enjoyable grilling season.

Swimming and other water-related activities are excellent ways to get the physical activity and health benefits needed for a healthy life. However, they are not risk-free. Learn more at CDC's Healthy Swimming website.
Week of May 20, 2019

Swimming and other water-related activities are excellent ways to get the physical activity and health benefits needed for a healthy life. However, they are not risk-free. Learn more at CDC’s Healthy Swimming website.

a family with dog sitting in front of a lake
Week of May 13, 2019

Studies have shown that the bond between people and their pets can increase fitness, lower stress, and bring happiness to their owners. Learn more about the health benefits of pet ownership at our “Healthy Pets, Healthy People” feature.

woman smiling and talking to friends
Week of May 6, 2019

More than 50% of Americans will be diagnosed with a mental illness or disorder at some point in their lifetime. See our page for more information and resources about mental health.

Vaccination is a highly effective, easy way to keep your family healthy. Print our easy vaccine guide and bring it to your next appointment, along with any questions you'd like to discuss.
Week of April 22, 2019

Vaccination is a highly effective, easy way to keep your family healthy. Print our easy vaccine guide and bring it to your next appointment, along with any questions you’d like to discuss.

April 18th is National Transgender HIV/AIDS Awareness Day. Click here to learn more about the specific HIV/AIDS prevention challenges for transgender people and what CDC is doing to help.
Week of April 15, 2019

April 18th is National Transgender HIV/AIDS Awareness Day. Click here to learn more about the specific HIV/AIDS prevention challenges for transgender people and what CDC is doing to help.

road blocked by flooding
Week of April 8, 2019

Floods, big or small, can have devastating effects on your home and your family. Take steps to reduce the harm caused by flooding.

baby in stroller smiling at mom
Week of April 1, 2019

By the age of 2 months, a baby should begin to smile at people. Learn more about important developmental milestones for children at our Learn the Signs. Act Early. website.

man coughing
Week of March 25, 2019

Symptoms of tuberculosis (TB) can include a bad cough that lasts three weeks or longer, or pain in the chest. Learn more about TB here.

Girl at airport on cell phone
Week of March 11, 2019

Blood clots, also called deep vein thrombosis (DVT), can be a serious risk for some long-distance travelers. The longer you are immobile, the greater your risk of developing a blood clot.

Pregnant woman with her hands on her belly
Week of March 4, 2019

Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) is one of many causes of birth defects that CDC is working to better understand. CMV can cause long-term problems, such as hearing loss, developmental and motor delays, vision loss, an abnormally small head, and seizures. Find out more about CMV.

In 2018, more than 1 in 4 high school students and about 1 in 14 middle school students used tobacco product in the past 30 days. Read our latest Vital Signs, "Tobacco Use By Youth is Rising."
Week of February 25, 2019

In 2018, more than 1 in 4 high school students and about 1 in 14 middle school students used tobacco product in the past 30 days. Read our latest Vital Signs, “Tobacco Use By Youth is Rising.”

1 in 4 new prescriptions for blood pressure medications are never filled. Health care professionals can help patients take blood pressure medicines as directed with our Blood Pressure Communications Kit.
Week of February 11, 2019

1 in 4 new prescriptions for blood pressure medications are never filled. Health care professionals can help patients take blood pressure medicines as directed with our Blood Pressure Communications Kit.

About 3 million Americans have glaucoma. Half of people with glaucoma don't know they have it. Learn more glaucoma facts here, and know your risks.
Week of January 28, 2019

About 3 million Americans have glaucoma. Half of people with glaucoma don’t know they have it. Learn more glaucoma facts here, and know your risks.

If stranded while driving in winter weather, tie a brightly colored cloth to the car antenna as a signal to rescuers. In adults, drowsiness is a sign of hypothermia. Learn more facts about winter safety on our Winter Weather Frequently Asked Questions page.
Week of January 22, 2019

If stranded while driving in winter weather, you should tie a brightly colored cloth to the car antenna as a signal to rescuers. In adults, drowsiness is a sign of hypothermia. Learn more facts about winter safety on our Winter Weather Frequently Asked Questions page.

woman working with petridish sample
Week of January 11, 2019

CDC is a leader in the fight against antibiotic resistance. Antibiotic resistance has the potential to impact all Americans at every stage of life. Find out what we are doing to help combat and slow this global threat.

CDC urges all women of reproductive age to take 400 micrograms (mcg) of folic acid each day. Visit our page for free resources and learn more about the importance of folic acid.
Week of January 7, 2019

CDC urges all women of reproductive age to take 400 micrograms (mcg) of folic acid each day. Visit our page for free resources and learn more about the importance of folic acid.

 

12 ways to health
Week of December 24, 2018

Learn how to stay safe and healthy with this festive song, sung to the tune of The Twelve Days of Christmas!

 

hand on alarm clock
Week of December 14, 2018

Most adults need at least 7 hours of sleep each night. However, more than one in three American adults say they don’t get the recommended amount of sleep. Not getting enough sleep over time can lead to serious health problems—and make certain health problems worse. Find out what you can do to get better sleep.

 

woman analyzing vegetables in box
Week of December 07, 2018

Subscription meal kits, mail-order food, and home-delivered groceries offer convenience. Make sure food safety is part of the package, too. Follow these tips to stay safe and healthy while enjoying meals prepared at home from these services.

 

Baby in carseat
Week of November 30, 2018

In the United States, motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of death for people aged 1‒54, and about 40,000 people were killed in crashes in 2017. However, many of these deaths can be prevented. Buckle up, drive sober, and stay safe on the roads this holiday season.

 

Puppy with emergency kit
Week of November 26, 2018

Pets are family. Do you have a plan for your pet in an emergency? Including pets in emergency plans helps your family’s ability to respond to an emergency. Be prepared: make a plan and prepare a disaster kit for your pet.

 

 

Antibiotic Awareness Week logo
Week of November 12, 2018

U.S. Antibiotic Awareness Week (USAAW) is an annual observance that raises awareness of the threat of antibiotic resistance and the importance of antibiotic use. Get involved! Join CDC and partners official USAAW events or host your own.

 

Woman taking a walk
Week of November 5, 2018

Venous thromboembolism (VTE), also known as blood clots is a serious, but preventable medical condition. CDC and the National Blood Clot Alliance’s campaign, Stop the Clot, Spread the Word builds public health awareness about VTE to prevent and reduce the occurrence of life-threatening blood clots. Learn more.

 

scary mask and custom contact lenses
Week of October 29, 2018

Don’t let an eye infection be the scariest part of your Halloween. Using decorative lenses without a valid prescription can cause serious harm to your eyes—haunting you long after October 31st.

 

Returning to your flooded home
Week of October 22, 2018

When returning to a home that’s been flooded after natural disasters such as hurricanes, tornadoes, and floods, be aware that your house may be contaminated with mold or sewage, which can cause health risks for your family. Read more on staying safe following a flood.

 

National Latinx AIDS Awareness Day
Week of October 15, 2018

Hispanics/Latinos represent nearly 18% of the total population of the United States, but accounted for 26% of the 40,324 new HIV diagnoses in 2016 in the United States and 6 dependent areas. Let’s Stop HIV Together. Find out how you can do your part to promote HIV prevention and treatment and help fight stigma.

 

Children's Mental Health
Week of October 8, 2018

Mental disorders among children are described as serious changes in the way children typically learn, behave, or handle their emotions, which cause distress and problems getting through the day. Talk to your child’s healthcare professional if you have concerns about the way they behave at home, in school, or with friends.

 

Fungal Disease Awareness Week Oct. 1-5, 2018
Week of October 1, 2018

Did you know some fungal infections can look like other illnesses? A key clue to when a sick person may have a fungal infection is that he or she is being treated with medications for another type of infection but does not get better. #ThinkFungus when symptoms of infection do not get better with treatment.

 

Get Ahead of Sepsis
Week of September 24, 2018

Sepsis is the body’s extreme response to an infection. At least 1.7 million people get sepsis each year in the United States and nearly 270,000 Americans die from sepsis each year. Get ahead of sepsis. Know the risks. Spot the Signs. Act Fast.

 

A pair of hands filling a pill case
Week of September 17, 2018

Nearly half of Americans take at least one prescription drug, and one in four Americans take three or more medications. A large-scale natural disaster, such as a hurricane, could make it difficult to get prescription and over-the-counter medicines. Be Prepared. Create an emergency supply.

 

two people holding hands
Week of September 9, 2018

Suicide Prevention Week. Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the US. It was responsible for nearly 45,000 deaths in 2016, with approximately one death every 12 minutes. #BeThere. If you or someone you know needs help, call 1-800-273-TALK (8255).

 

September is Healthy Aging Month
Week of September 3, 2018

September is Healthy Aging Month. The CDC’s Healthy Aging Program serves as the focal point at CDC for efforts to promote the health and quality of life of older Americans. Learn more about healthy aging and access to general health information for older adults.

 

STDs can be prevented
Week of August 27, 2018

CDC estimates 20 million new sexually transmitted disease (STD) infections occur every year in the United States. Youth ages 15-24 account for half of those new STD infections. STDs can be prevented. Get the facts and take control.

 

Contact Lens Health Week
Week of August 20, 2018

August 20-24 is Contact Lens Health Week. Failure to wear, clean, and store your lenses as directed by your eye doctor raises the risk of developing serious eye infections. Practice healthy habits now, for healthy eyes later.

 

foodborne illness
Week of August 13, 2018

Each year, 1 in 6 Americans get sick from eating contaminated food. Learn how CDC tracks foodborne illnesses and collaborates with state and local health departments and other federal agencies to investigate foodborne outbreaks.

 

Disability Inclusion
Week of August 6, 2018

Nearly 1 in 5 people in the U.S. has a disability. Often, there are multiple barriers that can make it difficult or even impossible for people with disabilities to function. Learn more about practices and policies designed to identify and remove barriers for people with disabilities.

 

 

Preganant woman and her doctor
Week of July 23, 2018

1 in 4 women in the United States carry Group B Strep (GBS), a common type of bacteria. This type of bacteria can be very dangerous to babies if passed on to them during childbirth. Learn more. Protect your baby from GBS.

 

young women playing soccer
Week of July 16, 2018

It’s National Youth Sports Week! To help ensure the health and safety of young athletes, CDC developed the HEADS UP Concussion in Youth Sports initiative. Learn more about preventing, recognizing, and responding to a concussion.

 

extreme heat
Week of July 9, 2018

Extreme heat causes more than 600 deaths each year. Heat-related deaths and illness are preventable. Take measures to stay cool, remain hydrated, and keep informed.

 

CDC estimates Salmonella causes about 1.2 million illnesses, 23,000 hospitalizations, and 450 deaths in the United States every year. Learn more about Salmonella and how to protect you and your family.
Week of July 2, 2018

CDC estimates Salmonella causes about 1.2 million illnesses, 23,000 hospitalizations, and 450 deaths in the United States every year. Learn more about Salmonella and how to protect you and your family.

 

Older man playing with child
Week of June 25, 2018

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common cause of dementia among older adults. 5.7 million Americans are estimated to be living with Alzheimer’s disease in 2018. Learn more about Alzheimer’s to recognize the differences between normal aging and changes due to this condition. Learn more.

 

Boy wearing life jacket near a body of water
Week of June 18, 2018

Drownings are a leading cause of injury death for young children ages 1 to 14. Read these key prevention tips to keep children from drowning. Learn more.

 

Baby with bright blue eyes
Week of June 11, 2018

Congenital cytomegalovirus (pronounced sy-toe-MEG-a-low-vy-rus) or congenital CMV for short can cause birth defects. About one out of every 200 babies is born with congenital CMV. Learn more.

 

rethink your drink
Week of June 4, 2018

Limiting the amount of sugar-sweetened beverage intake can help individuals maintain a healthy weight and have a healthy diet. Rethink your drink! Learn ways to reduce the number of calories you drink. Learn more.

 

Adult woman helping an older woman
Week of May 23, 2018

Osteoporosis is a medical condition where bones become weak and are more likely to break. If one of your parents has had a broken bone, especially a broken hip, early screening is important. Learn more.

Parents with young son
Week of May 15, 2018

Every 40 seconds, someone in the US has a stroke. Read these survivor stories to learn more about stroke, including how you may be at risk, how to recognize stroke, and what to do if stroke happens. Learn more.

 

The Wharf construction site in Washington, DC.
Week of May 7, 2018

Falls are the number one cause of construction-worker fatalities, accounting for one-third of on-the-job deaths in the industry. Set aside time to talk about falls in construction and how to prevent them. Learn more

air quality awareness
Week of April 30, 2018

Particle pollution has been linked to heart attacks and strokes, and even death in people with heart disease. Get the Air Quality Index to know when to expect high levels of air pollution and how to protect yourself. Learn more

phone in car
Week of April 23, 2018

Each day in the US, approximately 9 people are killed and more than 1,000 injured in crashes reported to involve a distracted driver. Focusing on the road can save lives. Learn more.

Man and woman reading a pamplet
Week of April 16, 2018

April is STD Awareness Month. There’s no avoiding the statistics: the number of reported sexually transmitted disease (STD) cases are at an all-time high, and if you are sexually active, you are at risk of infection. So what can you do? Arm yourself with information

Two people in hazmat suits
Week of April 9, 2018

Ever wonder how CDC scientists merge old-fashioned detective work with high-tech science to crack the cases of mystery diseases? Visit the David J. Sencer CDC Museum at CDC Headquarters.

Scientist researching with egg
Week of April 2, 2018

CDC′s Work Saves Lives Everywhere, Every Day.

CDC’s mission, simply put, is to keep Americans safe and healthy where they work, live and play. Scientists and disease detectives work around the world to track diseases, research outbreaks, respond to emergencies of all kinds.

Doctor
Week of March 27, 2018

TB is preventable and curable, yet it remains the world’s leading infectious disease killer. Learn what CDC is doing in the United States and around the world to eliminate this devastating disease.

Boy with a soccer ball with his dad
Week of March 19, 2018

Traumatic brain injuries, also known as TBIs, affect the lives of Americans nationwide. Anyone can experience a TBI, but data show that children and older adults (ages 65 and older) are at greater risk.

Mother and son cooking with vegetables and fruits
Week of March 12, 2018

March is National Nutrition Month and this year’s theme, “Go Further with Food,” encourages healthy eating habits and reducing food waste. Learn how to help your family eat better and “Go Further with Food.”

Group of adults of various ages
Week of March 5, 2018

Your need for immunization doesn’t end when you become an adult. Get vaccinated to protect yourself and your loved ones from serious diseases.

a family posing for a selfie on a beach
Week of February 26, 2018

Wherever your travels take you this spring break, stay healthy and safe with these tips.

Woman wearing red
Week of February 19, 2018

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for women in the United States. Take these steps to lower your risk.

Sleepy female student
Week of February 12, 2018

Children and adolescents who do not get enough sleep have a higher risk for many health and behavior problems. Learn how much sleep students need and how many are not getting it.

Fireman
Week of February 5, 2018

Is an adventure off the beaten path on your to-do list this year? Learn about your risks and prepare for a fun and safe trip with CDC Travelers’ Health.

Physician with an older adult
Week of January 29, 2018

Physical activity and exercise ease arthritis pain and improve the quality of life of adults living with arthritis. More than 54 million US adults have arthritis. Learn more.

New Year Celebration
Week of January 15, 2018

Let this New Year be your time to quit smoking. 

Do you have a cold or the flu? Compare the symptoms and learn more about flu complications.
Week of January 8, 2018

Do you have a cold or the flu? Compare the symptoms and learn more about flu complications.

CDC Fact of the Week
A family posing beside a snowman
Week of December 11, 2017

Brighten the holidays by making your health and safety a priority. Take steps to keep you and your loved ones safe and healthy—and ready to enjoy the holidays.

Strategic National Stockpile
Week of December 4, 2017

When the Department of Health and Human Services calls the Strategic National Stockpile answers. Learn how Federal Medical Stations help people during a public health emergency.

Pregnant woman holding broken cigarette
Week of November 27, 2017

Smoking during pregnancy can cause babies to be born too small or too early (preterm birth), certain birth defects, and stillbirth. Quitting smoking can be hard, but it is one of the best ways a woman can protect herself and her developing baby.

Snowy highway
Week of November 20, 2017

In the United States, motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of death for people aged 1‒54. Learn to keep yourself and others safe on the road over the holidays.

a teen girl using her inhaler
Week of November 13, 2017

Each year in the United States, about 50,000 people die from pneumonia. Learn how to lower your risk.

a pill bottle
Week of November 6, 2017

More than 183,000 people have died in the United States from overdoses related to prescription opioids from 1999–2015.

Girl child drinking from water fountain
Week of October 30, 2017

Children are more vulnerable to environmental exposures from before they are born through early childhood. Learn how to protect your child from exposure to health hazards in the environment.

infographic regarding preparations for wildfires
Week of October 23, 2017

More and more people make their homes in areas that are prone to wildfires. You can take steps to be ready for a wildfire and prepare your home and landscaping to reduce your risk.

Doctor and patient looking at clipboard
Week of October 16, 2017

Having an up-to-date vaccination record is important. This record tells you and your doctor if you’re protected against vaccine-preventable diseases. Use these tools to keep track of your immunizations.

I Am CDC
Week of October 10, 2017

Overweight and obesity are associated with at least 13 different types of cancer. These cancers make up 40 percent of all cancers diagnosed. Learn more.

I Am CDC
Week of October 2, 2017

The “I Am CDC” videos feature CDC staff who work 24/7 to defend America from health threats. Learn more.

CDC Keeping You Safe 24/7
Week of September 25, 2017

In uncertain times, safeguarding America’s health and security is more important than ever. Whether the threat is a disease outbreak, chronic condition, environmental hazard, natural disaster or deliberate attack, CDC works 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to keep Americans safe – in the US and around the world. Learn more.

Get Ahead of Sepsis
Week of September 19, 2017

Infections can put you and your family at risk for a life-threatening condition called sepsis. Learn more.

flooded street
Week of September 11, 2017

Get tips to keep you and family safe after a hurricane.

flooded street
Week of September 4, 2017

Take these important steps to protect yourself, your family and your home during a flood.

Did you know that Zika can be spread through sex? Take steps to protect yourself and your partner.
Week of August 28, 2017

Did you know that Zika can be spread through sex? Take steps to protect yourself and your partner.

A mother and toddler on their lawn
Week of August 14, 2017

EPA-registered insect repellents are proven safe and effective for everyone, including children over 2 months old and pregnant and breastfeeding women. Make sure to follow the directions on the label when applying.

5 middle aged people
Week of July 31, 2017

Almost 1 out of 3 people in the United States will develop shingles during their lifetime. Your risk of shingles increases as you get older. Learn more.

Harmful algal bloom in a lake
Week of July 24, 2017

Harmful algal blooms can produce toxins that are dangerous to people, animals, and the environment. Learn what harmful algal blooms are, how you and your pets can avoid them, and what CDC is doing to protect the public’s health.

Control Mosquitoes
Week of July 17, 2017

Everyone can do their part to help control mosquitoes. Learn how you can help.

Mother and son enjoying swimming pool
Week of July 10, 2017

Stay healthy and avoid recreational water illnesses (RWIs) when you swim in pools, water playgrounds, or other treated water venues, or use the hot tub/spa, by following a few simple steps.

A town in the foreground and lightning striking in the distance
Week of July 3, 2017

Is that thunder you hear? Was that a lightning flash? Learn how to protect yourself and your loved ones during a thunderstorm.

Jars with prpared food items.
Week of June 26, 2017

Home canning is an excellent way to preserve garden produce and share it with family and friends. But it can be risky—or even deadly—if not done correctly and safely.

Family of three on a beach
Week of June 19, 2017

Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States. Most cases of melanoma, the deadliest kind of skin cancer, are caused by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays. To lower your skin cancer risk, protect your skin from the sun and avoid indoor tanning.

Older couple
Week of June 12, 2017

Cancer survivors often face physical, mental, or financial problems. Learn how you can  help

Mother , father and son
Week of June 5, 2017

CDC reminds you to make sure you are up to date on all recommended vaccinations before traveling abroad

Woman clutching headphones and wincing
Week of May 29, 2017

May is “Better Hearing and Speech Month,” a time to raise awareness about what you need to do to protect your hearing. Loud noises can cause permanent hearing loss. And once it’s gone, you can’t get it back. Learn more.

CDC Fact of the Week
Mosquito
Week of May 22, 2017

Ever wonder how CDC scientists merge old-fashioned detective work with high-tech science to crack the cases of mystery diseases? Get the Story! Visit the David J. Sencer CDC Museum at CDC Headquarters. The museum is free and open to the public so we would like to see you soon.

City covered in smog
Week of May 1, 2017

Find out how air quality affects your health and use the Air Quality Index to help plan your day.

Two women
Week of April 24, 2017

About 1 out of 10 people may have a seizure in his or her lifetime. That means seizures are common, and one day you might need to help someone during or after a seizure. Learn more from CDC.

group of children
Week of April 19, 2017

During National Child Abuse Prevention Month, learn about CDC’s work to better understand the problem of child abuse and neglect and to prevent it before it begins.

Tornado
Week of April 10, 2017

Spring weather can be unpredictable. Reduce injury risk and plan ahead.  

Chickens
Week of April 3, 2017

Spring brings baby chicks. CDC reminds you that live poultry, such as chickens, ducks, geese, and turkeys, often carry germs such as Salmonella. After you touch a bird, or anything in the area where birds live and roam, wash your hands so you don’t get sick!

conjunctivitis
Week of March 27, 2017

Pink eye—or conjunctivitis—is common and spreads easily. It sometimes needs medical treatment, depending on the cause. CDC helps you to know the symptoms, when to seek treatment, and how to help prevent it.

Stop the clot. Spread the word.
Week of March 13, 2017

Read about CDC’s Stop the Clot campaign and learn how to protect yourself from blood clots.

Dairy products
Week of March 6, 2017

Raw milk can contain harmful germs, such as bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can make you very sick or possibly kill you. If you’re thinking about drinking raw milk because you believe it has health benefits, consider other options.

a girl getting a dental exam
Week of February 27, 2017

February is Children’s Dental Health Month. Learn how most cavities in children can be prevented, and how CDC brings this program to children at highest risk for decay.

Group walking in the park
Week of February 21, 2017

This February celebrate African American History Month. Learn about how heart disease, cancer, and stroke impact African Americans and how to improve your health.

a girl getting a dental exam
Week of February 13, 2017

February is Children’s Dental Health Month. Learn how most cavities in children can be prevented, and how CDC brings this program to children at highest risk for decay.

Woman leaning on exercise ball
Week of February 6, 2017

February is American Heart Month. Learn about heart disease and women and what you can do to keep a healthy heart.

Students studying together
Week of January 30, 2017

CDC’s Office of Minority Health and Health Equity (OMHHE) supports internship opportunities for qualified undergraduate and graduate students to gain meaningful experiences in public health settings. Learn about programs that provide valuable exposure to a wide range of public health opportunities.

CDC Fact of the Week
Zika and pregnancy
Week of January 23, 2017

CDC marks one year of the Zika response. Learn more about CDC’s work.

Three people
Week of January 17, 2017

CDC reminds you that adults need vaccines too. There are many important reasons to get vaccinated Learn more.

House and yard covered in snow
Week of January 9, 2017

CDC has tips to prepare you, your home and your car for winter emergencies. Read more.

Page last reviewed: June 21, 2022