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Pregnant Women

How to protect yourself

Until we know more, CDC recommends special precautions for pregnant women.

Do not travel to an area with Zika

What to do if you live in or travel to an area with Zika

If you live in an area with Zika, or if you or your sexual partner travel to an area with Zika, follow the steps below to protect your pregnancy.

Right now, Zika is spreading rapidly in Puerto Rico and pregnant women are at risk for becoming infected with Zika. If current trends continue, at least 1 in 4 people, including women who become pregnant, may become infected with Zika. Since Zika causes microcephaly and other birth defects, it is more important than ever to consider if now is the right time for you to get pregnant. If you decide that now isn’t the right time for you to have a baby, there are contraceptive methods that are safe and effective. If you decide to get pregnant, there are important steps you should take to try to protect yourself from getting Zika.

If you… When to talk with a doctor When to be tested
Traveled to an area with Zika Talk to a doctor or other healthcare provider about your travel even if you don’t feel sick.   If you have symptoms of Zika within 2 weeks of traveling, you should be tested for Zika.
If you do not develop symptoms of Zika within 2 weeks of traveling, you should be tested for Zika.
Live in an area with Zika Talk to a doctor or other healthcare provider throughout your pregnancy.  

You may be at risk of getting Zika throughout your pregnancy. For this reason, doctors or other healthcare providers can offer testing

  • At the first prenatal visit and
  • A second test in the second trimester.  

If you have symptoms of Zika at any time during your pregnancy, you should be tested for Zika.  

Items to discuss with your doctor or other healthcare provider

See your doctor or other healthcare provider if you have the symptoms described above and have visited or live in an area with Zika.

Doctors visit checklist: For pregnant women who traveled to an area with Zika fact sheet thumbnail

Doctor’s Visit Checklist: For Pregnant Women Who Traveled to an Area with Zika

Doctors visit checklist: For pregnant women living in an area with Zika factsheet thumbnail

Doctor’s Visit Checklist: For Pregnant Women Living in an Area with Zika

Zika virus testing for pregnant women living in an area with Zika factsheet thumbnail.

Zika virus testing for pregnant women living in an area with Zika

Zika Virus Testing for Any Pregnant Woman Not Living in an Area With Zika

If you test positive for Zika

A positive test result might cause concerns, but it doesn’t mean your baby will have birth defects.

For Parents: A Positive Zika Virus Test: What does it mean for my child?

For Pregnant Women: A Positive Zika Virus Test: What does it mean for me?

If you test positive for Zika and live in the U.S.

To understand more about Zika virus infection, CDC established the US Zika Pregnancy Registry and is collaborating with state, tribal, local, and territorial health departments to collect information about pregnancy and infant outcomes following laboratory evidence of Zika virus.

US Zika Pregnancy Registry Healthcare Providers: How to Register Patients infographic thumbnail

Fact Sheet for Pregnant Women

Factsheets & posters

Learn more about Zika with our fact sheets and posters.

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