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CDC Tobacco Free Social Media Toolkit

Within this guide you will find information and suggested messages from our CDC Tips From Former Smokers campaign (Tips). For more Tips images and CDC Tobacco Free content you can visit our Media Campaign Resource Center (MCRC). In addition to our Tips ads we have social media images related to holidays, seasonal content, and general quitting messages. All social media content found on the MCRC is in the public domain and free to use by anyone for any purpose without restriction under copyright law. Please remember to use the #CDCTips hashtag when tweeting out any Tips related content.

CDC Tobacco Free Social Media Channels

Tips Participants

Below is a list of our CDC Tips From Former Smokers participants by disease. You can find more information about each of our participants by visiting our Real Stories page.

Cessation
  • Beatrice
  • James
  • Tiffany
  • Wilma
Asthma/Secondhand Smoke
  • Ellie
  • Jamason
  • Jessica
  • Nathan
Gum Disease
  • Brett
  • Felicity
Buerger’s Disease
  • Brandon
  • Marie
Cancer
  • Annette (lung)
  • Christine (oral)
  • Rose(lung)
  • Shane (throat)
  • Sharon (throat)
  • Shawn (throat)
  • Terrie (oral/throat)
Preterm Birth
  • Amanda
COPD
  • Michael
Diabetes
  • Bill
Heart Disease/Stroke
  • Mariano
  • Roosevelt
  • Suzy
HIV and Smoking/Stroke
  • Brian

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Women’s Health Content

Tip’s Participants:
NAME (YEAR) BIO VIDEOS
Amanda (2014) Amanda smoked while pregnant. She gave birth to her baby girl two months early. Amanda’s Ad (TV Ad)
Amanda’s Story
Rose (2014) Rose was diagnosed with lung cancer which later spread to her brain. Rose’s Ad (TV Ad)
Rose’s Story
Felicita (2014) Felicita developed gum disease and lost all her teeth by age 50. Felicita’s Story
Terrie (2014-2011) Terrie was diagnosed with oral and throat cancers and had her larynx removed. Terrie courageously fought cancer until her death at age 53 in the fall of 2013. Terrie’s Ad June 2014(TV Ad)
Terrie’s Ad March 2012(TV Ad)
Terrie’s Ad March 2013 (TV Ad)
Terrie’s Ad January 2014(TV Ad)
Terrie’s Ad January 2014(TV Ad)
“Terrie, What Are You Doing?”
Beatrice (2013) Beatrice quit smoking for her two sons. Beatrice’s Story
“I Told Everyone I Stopped Smoking”
Ellie (2013) Ellie never smoked, but began having asthma attacks triggered by secondhand smoke at work. “It was Terrifying to Get an Asthma Attack”
Smoke and the LGBT Scene
Tiffany (2013) Tiffany quit smoking for her daughter. Tiffany’s Ad (TV Ad)
You Don’t Quit Just for Yourself
Surprising Things About Quitting
Annette (2012) Annette was diagnosed with lung cancer and had a lung removed. No video – see her page for images
Annette’s Story
Christine (2012) Christine was diagnosed with stage IV oral cancer and had part of her jaw removed. No video – see her page for images
Christine’s Story
Jessica/Aden (2012) Jessica realized her son Aden was suffering from asthma caused by secondhand smoke. Jessica’s Asthma Ad (TV Ad)
Jessica’s Story
Marie (2012) Marie has Buerger’s disease caused by smoking. Buerger’s Disease
Marie’s Story
Sharon (2012) Sharon was diagnosed with stage IV throat cancer at the age of 37. Sharon’s Story
Suzy (2012) Suzy suffered a stroke and now her son has to help care for her. Suzy’s Ad
Wilma (2012) Wilma tried many times to quit smoking and finally succeeded in quitting for good in 2007. Cessation Tips Ad

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Sample Messages:

Below are suggested messages based on our newest Tips participants and some of our most engaging participants from previous campaigns. You are always welcome to promote participants not listed below by using information and resources available on our website (www.cdc.gov/tips), the Media Campaign Resource Center, or the CDC Streaming Health YouTube channel. All of our female Tips participants are listed in the chart above along with a short bio and links to their TV ad or vignette (longer video telling more of their story than what is seen in the TV ads).

Amanda

Tips From A Former Smoker. Some of the reasons to quit smoking are very small. If you're pregnant or thinking about having a baby and you smoke, please CALL 1-800-QUIT-NOW.

FB: Amanda smoked during her pregnancy. Her baby was born two months early and spent weeks in an incubator. "I couldn't hold her much in the first few weeks.” Now she is sharing her story to encourage women to quit smoking.

Tweet: Amanda smoked during pregnancy. Her baby was born 2 months early. "I couldn't hold her much in the first weeks.” #CDCTips

Rose

A Tip From A Former Smoker. Be preapred. Your lung cancer can spread to your brain. Like many people, Rose never thought this would happen to her. For free help to quit, CALL 1-800-QUIT-NOW.

FB: Rose started smoking at age 13. She never thought cancer would happen to her. At 58, she was diagnosed with lung cancer, which later spread to her brain. "I regret picking up smoking in the first place.”

Tweet: Rose started smoking at age 13, but never thought cancer would happen to her. At 58, she was diagnosed with lung cancer. #CDCTips

Jessica/Aden

A Tip About Secondhand Smoke. Don't be shy about telling people not to smoke around your kids. For free help to quit smoking, CALL 1-800-QUIT-NOW.

FB: Aden has asthma triggered by tobacco smoke. His mom Jessica encourages you to protect your kids from secondhand smoke exposure by asking people not to smoke around them. Speak up and help keep them healthy!

Tweet: Speak up! Protect your kids from secondhand smoke by asking people not to smoke around them. #CDCTips

Tiffany

A Tip From A Former Smoker. I quit so I could be around for my daughter. For free help to quit smoking, CALL 1-800-QUIT-NOW.

FB: “What would you miss more, your children or cigarettes?” When she was 16, Tiffany’s mother died of lung cancer from smoking. Tiffany quit smoking to be around for her own daughter.

Tweet: “What would you miss more, your children or cigarettes?” RT Tiffany‘s #CDCTips ad & find your reason to quit.

Suzy

A Tip From A Former Smoker. If you smoke, enjoy your independence while you can. For free help to quit smoking, CALL 1-800-QUIT-NOW.

FB: “Apparently, some people don’t know that smoking can cause a stroke. It can.” At age 57, Suzy suffered a stroke caused by smoking. It cost Suzy her independence.

Tweet: “Some people don’t know that smoking can cause a stroke.” Suzy lost her independence after a stroke caused by smoking. #CDCTips

Terrie

A Tip From A Former Smoker. Please quit so you don't go through what I went through. For free help to quit smoking, CALL 1-800-QUIT-NOW.

FB: Terrie shared her story because she didn’t want anyone to go through what she had to go through. In this emotional new ad she encourages others, “Don’t start smoking and if you do smoke, quit.” Terrie’s Ad: Don’t Smoke

Tweet: Terrie encourages others in powerful new #CDCTips ad, “Don’t start smoking and if you do smoke, quit.”

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Surgeon General’s Report:

The Health Consequences of Smoking-50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General, 2014

  • The disease risks from smoking by women have risen sharply over the last 50 years and are now equal to those for men for lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and cardiovascular diseases
  • Cigarette smoking is a primary cause of COPD among women, and the risk increases with the amount and duration of smoking.
  • Approximately 90 percent of deaths from COPD among women in the United States can be attributed to cigarette smoking.
  • The number of women dying from COPD now exceeds the number of men.
  • Women who smoke are 40 times more likely than non-smoking women to have COPD
  • Women who smoke while pregnant put their babies at risk for certain birth defects, such as cleft lip or cleft palate
  • More than 100,000 babies have died in the last 50 years from Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, complications from prematurity, complications from low birth weight, and other pregnancy problems resulting from parental smoking
  • Smoking can lead to ectopic (tubal) pregnancy and impaired fertility, cleft lip and cleft palates in babies of women who smoke during early pregnancy

Additional Resources:

Channel’s to follow:

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