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Badges and Buttons

Social media allows you an opportunity to raise awareness about health issues important to women. Add a button or badge to your site or page. Each badge or button focuses on staying healthy and the prevention of disease, illness, and disability.

Arthritis

Move to improve your Arthritis. Learn More. Image of three women walking.

Physical activity can reduce pain and improve function, mood, and quality of life for adults with arthritis. Physical activity can also help manage other chronic conditions that are common among adults with arthritis, such as diabetes, heart disease, and obesity.

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Binge Drinking for Females

Nearly 14 million US women binge drink, averaging 6 drinks per binge.

New estimates show that binge drinking* is a bigger problem than previously thought. More than 38 million US adults binge drink, about 4 times a month, and the largest number of drinks per binge is on average 8. This behavior greatly increases the chances of getting hurt or hurting others due to car crashes, violence, and suicide.

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Breast and Gynecological Cancers

Cervical, Ovarian, Uterine, Vaginal, Vulvar. Get the facts about gynecologic cancer.    Do you know the symptoms of gynecologic cancer? Get the facts.

The Inside Knowledge: Get the Facts About Gynecologic Cancer campaign raises awareness of the five main types of gynecologic cancer: cervical, ovarian, uterine, vaginal, and vulvar. It encourages women to pay attention to their bodies and know what is normal for them, so they can recognize the warning signs of gynecologic cancers and seek medical care. When gynecologic cancers are found early, treatment is most effective.

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Find free and low-cost breast and cervical cancer screenings in your area – National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program

CDC's National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) provides access to breast and cervical cancer screening services to underserved women in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, 5 U.S. territories, and 12 tribes.

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Black women are 40% more likely to die of breast cancer than white women. Learn Why.

Black women are 40% more likely to die of breast cancer than white women. Learn why.

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Breastfeeding

1 in 3 mothers stop breastfeeding without hospital support. CDC Vital Signs™: www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns

In the US, most babies start breastfeeding, but within the first week, half have already been given formula, and by 9 months, only 31% of babies are breastfeeding at all. The Baby- Friendly Hospital Initiative describes Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding that have been shown to increase breastfeeding rates by providing support to mothers.

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Colorectal Cancer

Are you the picture of health? Get screened for colorectal cancer.

CDC's multiyear, multimedia Screen for Life: National Colorectal Cancer Action Campaign informs men and women aged 50 years and older about the importance of having regular colorectal cancer screening tests. Screening tests help find precancerous polyps so they can be removed before they have a chance to turn into cancer, thus preventing the disease. Screening also can find this cancer at an early stage, when treatment is most effective.

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Flu

The FLU Ends with U. Moms make a difference. Learn more: www.flu.gov   The FLU Ends with U. Moms make a difference. Learn more: www.flu.gov

Influenza (the flu) is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses. It can cause mild to severe illness, and at times can lead to death. Some people, such as older people, young children, and people with certain health conditions, are at high risk for serious flu complications. The best way to prevent the flu is by getting vaccinated each year.

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Folic Acid

Before and during pregnancy I take 400mcg of folic acid every day. cdc.gov/folicacid

If a woman has enough folic acid in her body before and during pregnancy, it can help prevent major birth defects of the baby’s brain and spine. Women need 400 micrograms (mcg) of folic acid every day.

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Hand Washing

Hand hygiene saves lives

In the United States, hospital patients get nearly 2 million infections each year. That’s about 1 infection for every 20 patients. Infections that patients get in the hospital can be life-threatening and hard to treat. Hand hygiene is one of the most important ways to prevent the spread of infections.

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Heart Disease and Stroke

Save your heart, take the Million Hearts pledge, and celebrate American Heart Month

Heart disease and stroke are an epidemic in the United States today. Many of the people who are at high risk for heart attack or stroke don't know it. Talking to your doctor about your heart health and getting your blood pressure and cholesterol checked are important first steps to reduce your risk. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in females. Stroke is the third leading cause of death in females.

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HIV/AIDS

Take Charge. Take The Test

Take Charge. Take the Test.™ focuses on African American women. Young African American women can take charge of their health by knowing their HIV status — and by taking steps to protect themselves from HIV. This campaign, which was first piloted in Cleveland and Philadelphia, reached thousands of African American women with this important and empowering health message. http://www.hivtest.org/takecharge/

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Original_file

The real deal on STDs and testing is simple. If you have sex, use protection. Condoms are the only method that can help prevent STD infection so learn more about how to use them.
And if you decide to have sex, GYT — Get Yourself Tested. A lot of STDs don’t have any symptoms so getting tested is the only way to know for sure.

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Pregnancy and New Moms

text4baby

Get free text messages with tips for a healthy pregnancy and baby. Text4baby is a free service that provides pregnant women and new moms with free text messages each week on pregnancy and baby care. These messages are timed to a woman's due date or the baby's date of birth.

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Seat Belt Safety

CDC Vital Signs™ – Learn vital information on seat belt use. Read Vital Signs™…

Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for people age 5 – 34. Adult seat belt use is the single most effective way to save lives and reduce injuries in crashes. The percentage of adults who always wear seat belts increased from 80% to 85% between 2002 and 2008. Even so, 1 in 7 adults do not wear a seat belt on every trip.

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Sickle Cell

I got tested!  More than 2 million people have sickle cell trait.  Do you? www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/sicklecell

Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a group of inherited red blood cell disorders. In SCD, the red blood cells become hard and sticky and look like a C-shaped farm tool called a "sickle." People with SCD can live full lives and enjoy most of the activities that other people do. If you have SCD, it’s important to learn how to stay as healthy as possible.

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Skin Cancer

Get the truth about tanning. Your natural skin color is great the way it is!

Your natural skin color is great the way it is! Indoor tanning before you're 35 increases your risk of melanoma by 75%. Young women are getting skin cancer more often. The risk is real! Melanoma—the deadliest kind—is the third most common cancer in people from 15 to 39. You can get melanoma in your eyes.

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Smoking

From those of us at Smokefree Women: Congratulations! You are taking the first step to quitting cigarette smoking. We wrote this guide with the help of ex-smokers and experts. It can help you prepare to quit and support you in the days and weeks after you quit.

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Let Your Kids Inspire You. Quit Now

Celebrate Moms for Being Smoke Free!

This Mother's Day, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) encourages you to congratulate and give the gift of thanks to those mothers who have quit smoking and to offer support to those who are trying to quit.

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Teen Pregnancy

1 in 10 new mothers is a teen. CDC Vital Signs™: www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns

More than 400,000 teen girls, aged 15-19 years, give birth each year in the US. Having a child during the teen years carries high costs—emotional, physical, and financial—to the mother, father, child, and community. Parents, educators, public health and medical professionals, and community organizations all have a role to play in reducing teen pregnancy.

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Contact Us:
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    1600 Clifton Rd
    Atlanta, GA
    30329-4027 USA
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    TTY: (888) 232-6348
  • Contact CDC–INFO
USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDepartment of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention   1600 Clifton Road Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, USA
800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636) TTY: (888) 232-6348 - Contact CDC–INFO
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