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Vision Health Initiative (VHI) Report

Prevalence of Visual Impairment (VI) among American Adults w/without Diabetes


The overall prevalence of presenting VI among the participants with diabetes was
11.0% (9.7% moderate and 1.4% severe); among those without diabetes, the prevalence was 5.9% (5.1% and 0.9%, respectively) (Figure). After optical correction (objective autorefraction test), the prevalence of uncorrectable VI was 3.8% among the adults with diabetes (2.9% moderate and 1.0% severe) and 1.4% among those without diabetes (1.2% and 0.3%, respectively). Overall, the prevalence of correctable VI among the respondents with diabetes was 7.2% (95% CI, 5.5% to 9.4%) and 4.5% (95% CI, 4.2% to 4.9%) among those without diabetes.

 

The overall prevalence of VI among participants with diabetes was 11.0% (9.7% moderate and 1.4% severe); those without diabetes prevalence was 5.9% (5.1% and 0.9%, respectively). After optical correction, the prevalence of uncorrectable VI was 3.8% among adults with diabetes (2.9% moderate and 1.0% severe) and 1.4% among those without diabetes (1.2% and 0.3%, respectively). Overall, the prevalence of correctable VI among the respondents with diabetes was 7.2% (95% CI, 5.5% to 9.4%) and 4.5% (95% CI, 4.2% to 4.9%) among those without diabetes.

Data Source: 1999–2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES)

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Zhang X, Gregg EW, Cheng YJ, et al. Diabetes mellitus and visual impairment: national health and nutrition examination survey, 1999-2004. Arch Ophthalmol 2008;126(10):1421–1427.

Note: Presenting VI was defined as a presenting visual acuity (VA) worse than 20/40 in the better-seeing eye before an objective autorefraction test. Uncorrectable VI was defined as VA worse than 20/40 in the better-seeing eye after an objective autorefraction test. Correctable VI was defined as VA worse than 20/40 in the better-seeing eye before an objective autorefraction test that could be improved to normal (VA≥20/40) after an objective autorefraction test. Estimated prevalence of correctable severe impairment among people with diabetes has a relative standard error higher than 30% and is considered to be statistically unreliable. No Diabetes Mellitus (NDM) indicates no diabetes mellitus; S, severe; M, moderate. Error bars represent 95% confidence intervals.
 


 

 
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