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Notice and Correction of 2004 NYTS Data Errors

Dataset

An error was made in the computation of the analytic weights for the original 2004 NYTS dataset. Subsequently, analysis using these data will lead to miscalculation of both estimates and standard errors.

The 2004 NYTS dataset has since been corrected. Data users who downloaded the NYTS dataset from the Office on Smoking and Health’s Web site prior to November 26, 2005, should destroy any copies kept on file. Any analysis conducted using the improperly weighted original dataset should be re-run using the corrected dataset.

MMWR—Tobacco Use, Access, and Exposure to Tobacco in Media Among Middle and High School Students—United States, 2004

April 1, 2005 / Vol. 54 / No. 12

Calculations for the MMWR article “Tobacco Use, Access, and Exposure to Tobacco in Media Among Middle and High School Students—United States, 2004” were conducted using the original, improperly weighted NYTS dataset. Subsequently, both estimates and standard errors were affected. Analysis has been re-run and shows the following:

Among Asian middle school students, use of any tobacco (5.1%), bidis (1.1%), and kreteks (1.5%) did not significantly decrease from 2002–2004 as previously reported (Text and Table 1) in the original article. Among Hispanic high school students, use of bidis (4.8%) significantly increased from 2002–2004 in addition to the increase in cigar use previously reported (Table 2) in the original article. Lastly, among female and black non-Hispanic high school students, those who reported they were not refused the purchase of cigarettes (70.8% and 70.9%, respectively) did not significantly change from 2002–2004 as previously reported (Text and Table 3) in the original article.

These corrected data yield the same key finding as was previously reported: the lack of significant decreases in the use of almost all tobacco products among U.S. middle and high school students from 2002 to 2004 underscores the need to fully implement evidence-based strategies that are effective in preventing youth tobacco use. Please see below for further information.

Corrected Text and Data Tables: MMWR—Tobacco Use, Access, and Exposure to Tobacco in Media Among Middle and High School Students—United States, 2004

  • Text–Corrected [PDF–31KB]
  • TABLE 1—Corrected. Percentage of students in middle school (grades 6–8) who were current users of any tobacco product, by product type, sex, and race/ethnicity—National Youth Tobacco Survey, United States, 2002 and 2004
  • TABLE 2—Corrected. Percentage of students in high school (grades 9–12) who were current users of any tobacco product, by product type, sex, and race/ethnicity—National Youth Tobacco Survey, United States, 2002 and 2004
  • TABLE 3—Corrected. Percentage of students in middle school (grades 6–8) and high school (grades 9–12) who reported being exposed to tobacco-related media and advertising, and current cigarette smokers aged < 18 years who tried to buy cigarettes in a store, by sex and race/ethnicity—National Youth Tobacco Survey, United States, 2004
 
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