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Faith-Based FAQs

Why is CDC focusing on this faith-based initiative?

Faith based organizations (FBOs) have long played an important role in addressing social challenges and protecting people at risk. The Tips ads have been airing nationally, and concerned smokers may be going to their place of worship to seek advice or assistance on quitting. Tobacco use is the leading preventable cause of disease and death in the United States. The faith community can be a powerful force in reducing the toll tobacco use has taken on health.

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Which faith-based organizations are supporting the Tips From Former Smokers campaign?
  • American Baptist Convention
  • Islamic Society of North America
  • National Episcopal Health Ministries
  • Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism
  • Seventh Day Adventists
  • Southern Baptist Convention
  • United Church of Christ
  • United Methodists Church

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As a faith leader, I have several competing social issues to present to my members. Why is reducing tobacco use important?

Tobacco use is still the number-one preventable cause of death and disease in the United States. It is a risk factor for heart disease, stroke, diabetes, cancer, and other common chronic diseases. The good news is that the majority of tobacco users say they want to quit, and more than half try to quit each year. However, only 4% to 7% of smokers are successful in quitting each year. You can make a difference!

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I don’t have a medical background. What can I do to help my members quit smoking?

Talking with your members about tobacco use has never been easier. Resources to support your work with members include:

AmandaAmanda tried several times to quit smoking. She says prayer helped her finally succeed.
"I learned different ways to handle stress." "I started exercising..." "I prayed a lot."


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5 Steps to Prepare to Quit Smoking, an overview to help guide quitters
  • 1-800-QUIT-NOW (1-800-784-8669), a free quitline
  • 1-855-DÉJELO-YA (1-855-335-3569), a free quitline for Spanish speakers.
  • CDC.gov/tips and CDC.gov/consejos (Spanish). CDC's Tips campaign Web site features the real people in the Tips ads and a quitting guide.
Amanda

Amanda tried several times to quit smoking. She says prayer played a large role in helping her finally succeed.

"I learned different ways to handle stress. I started exercising and I definitely prayed a lot."


 

I'm ready to quit! Free resources provided by Smokefree.gov
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